A Must Read!

I have found an excellent resource on Object Oriented Programming.

http://technical-talk.com/SoftDev/OOP/OOPBASICS.asp

Hi,

Am Mittwoch, 03. Okt 2007, 18:30:03 +0900 schrieb
[email protected]:

I have found an excellent resource on Object Oriented Programming.

http://technical-talk.com/SoftDev/OOP/OOPBASICS.asp
^^^
An authority on smart software design.

Bertram

On Oct 3, 2007, at 7:53 , Michael T. Richter wrote:

(I have similar questions about people acting as if functional
programming – '50s – were the New Deal.)

Huh. I haven’t seen many people claiming Roosevelt had much influence
on computer science.

Michael G.
grzm seespotcode net

programming – '50s – were the New Deal.)

Huh. I haven’t seen many people claiming Roosevelt had much influence
on computer science.

“Since 1933, politicians and pundits have often called for a “new deal”
regarding an object. That is, they demand a completely new, large-scale
approach to a project.”

From: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/New_Deal#Legacies

Clear as mud?

On Oct 3, 2007, at 10:08 AM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

calculations for that, however, were done by rooms full of men and
women operating mechanical desk calculators, under the direction of
John Von Neumann and others. These men and women were known as
“computers”, and in many cases had college degrees in mathematics.

The genius of Von Neumann was that he saw that such calculations
could be done faster, more accurately and with lower cost
electronically. But it didn’t happen until after the Manhattan
Project was over and FDR was in his grave.

Slide Rule

John J. wrote:

grzm seespotcode net
FDR was in his grave.

Slide Rule

Uh … try integrating PDEs with a room full of people running slide
rules some time. :slight_smile:

The electronic equivalent of the slide rule, the analog computer, was
limited to a precision of at best five decimal digits, and could
integrate ordinary differential equations easily. But partial
differential equations are a whole 'nutha ball game. :slight_smile:

Michael G. wrote:

grzm seespotcode net

Well … he did fund the Manhattan Project, after all. Most of the
calculations for that, however, were done by rooms full of men and women
operating mechanical desk calculators, under the direction of John Von
Neumann and others. These men and women were known as “computers”, and
in many cases had college degrees in mathematics.

The genius of Von Neumann was that he saw that such calculations could
be done faster, more accurately and with lower cost electronically. But
it didn’t happen until after the Manhattan Project was over and FDR
was in his grave.

On Oct 3, 2007, at 11:37 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

Project was over and FDR was in his grave.

Slide Rule
Uh … try integrating PDEs with a room full of people running
slide rules some time. :slight_smile:

The electronic equivalent of the slide rule, the analog computer,
was limited to a precision of at best five decimal digits, and
could integrate ordinary differential equations easily. But
partial differential equations are a whole 'nutha ball game. :slight_smile:

Put a lot of stuff in space though!
And pioneered through the RF and amplifier circuits. (think vacuum
tubes/ valves, now that’s some hardcore engineering!)

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