Forum: Ruby contest season (or something)

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Bb6ecee0238ef2461bef3416722b35c5?d=identicon&s=25 pat eyler (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 18:41
(Received via mailing list)
It looks like there's a cool programming contest scheduled for New
Year's Eve:
http://opc.kurukshetra.org.in/opc/

 a $1,000 first prize, a $500 second prize, and 5 x $100 third prizes.

I'm not sure which timezone this is actually happening in, as it's
based in India,
but it looks pretty cool nonetheless.
Bb6ecee0238ef2461bef3416722b35c5?d=identicon&s=25 pat eyler (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 18:45
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/29/06, pat eyler <pat.eyler@gmail.com> wrote:
> It looks like there's a cool programming contest scheduled for New Year's Eve:
> http://opc.kurukshetra.org.in/opc/
>
>  a $1,000 first prize, a $500 second prize, and 5 x $100 third prizes.
>
> I'm not sure which timezone this is actually happening in, as it's
> based in India, but it looks pretty cool nonetheless.

And the original article *does* give the time zone.  I just glossed over
it.
Ff9e18f0699bf079f1fc91c8d4506438?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 18:55
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pat eyler wrote:
> It looks like there's a cool programming contest scheduled for New
> Year's Eve:
> http://opc.kurukshetra.org.in/opc/
>
> a $1,000 first prize, a $500 second prize, and 5 x $100 third prizes.
>
> I'm not sure which timezone this is actually happening in, as it's
> based in India,
> but it looks pretty cool nonetheless.

"Participants can submit solutions in the following languages -- "


No functional languages?  No Lisp? No Haskell?

Bah.


It's not a *real* programming contest.

:)

--
James Britt

"The use of anthropomorphic terminology when dealing with
computing systems is a symptom of professional immaturity."
  - Edsger W. Dijkstra
Bb6ecee0238ef2461bef3416722b35c5?d=identicon&s=25 pat eyler (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 19:01
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/29/06, James Britt <james.britt@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> "Participants can submit solutions in the following languages -- "
>
>
> No functional languages?  No Lisp? No Haskell?

Yeah, but then all the winners would be FP geeks.  This way everyone
else get's a shot.

>
> Bah.
>
>
> It's not a *real* programming contest.
>

Sure, it's just like AA or AAA league.

> :)

;^)
3bb23e7770680ea44a2d79e6d10daaed?d=identicon&s=25 unknown (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 21:55
(Received via mailing list)
Quoting pat eyler <pat.eyler@gmail.com>:

> It looks like there's a cool programming contest scheduled for New Year's
> Eve:
> http://opc.kurukshetra.org.in/opc/
>
>  a $1,000 first prize, a $500 second prize, and 5 x $100 third prizes.
>
> I'm not sure which timezone this is actually happening in, as it's
> based in India,
> but it looks pretty cool nonetheless.

Anyone taking side bets as to which language the winners will be using?

If I were at all competent in C, I'd sure take a shot at it, but the
only
language on that list I'd be able to speed-code in at this point is
Perl, and I
rather doubt that I could take on a C programmer in something like that.

In any event, my side bet is that the winner will be using either C or
C++. :)
Ff9e18f0699bf079f1fc91c8d4506438?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 22:41
(Received via mailing list)
pat eyler wrote:
>> > but it looks pretty cool nonetheless.
>>
>> "Participants can submit solutions in the following languages -- "
>>
>>
>> No functional languages?  No Lisp? No Haskell?
>
> Yeah, but then all the winners would be FP geeks.  This way everyone
> else get's a shot.

Quite true.


--
James Britt

http://www.ruby-doc.org    - Ruby Help & Documentation
http://beginningruby.com   - Beginning Ruby: The Online Book
http://www.rubystuff.com   - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff
http://www.jamesbritt.com  - Playing with Better Toys
2ee1a7960cc761a6e92efb5000c0f2c9?d=identicon&s=25 William James (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 23:16
(Received via mailing list)
pat eyler wrote:
> It looks like there's a cool programming contest scheduled for New Year's Eve:
> http://opc.kurukshetra.org.in/opc/
>
>  a $1,000 first prize, a $500 second prize, and 5 x $100 third prizes.
>
> I'm not sure which timezone this is actually happening in, as it's
> based in India,
> but it looks pretty cool nonetheless.

>From the site:
"You are given N integer numbers. Choose thee of them which give
maximum product."

I don't get it.  Isn't this the same as finding the 3 largest numbers?
4fea1ef11180adaaa299d503ca6010d0?d=identicon&s=25 John W. Kennedy (Guest)
on 2006-12-29 23:46
(Received via mailing list)
William James wrote:
>>From the site:
> "You are given N integer numbers. Choose thee of them which give
> maximum product."
>
> I don't get it.  Isn't this the same as finding the 3 largest numbers?

Integers are not necessarily positive; the complications introduced
thereby are -- interesting.

Since this is a /programming/ problem, the question arises, too, of what
to do about overflow. (In Ruby, the answer is, "ignore it, because it
won't happen except under system-crashing conditions", but I'm not sure
that's the answer they have in mind.)
3bb23e7770680ea44a2d79e6d10daaed?d=identicon&s=25 M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2006-12-30 00:28
(Received via mailing list)
James Britt wrote:
>>> > based in India,
> Quite true.
>
>
Besides, you can use a functional programming *style* in Ruby fairly
easily if you wish. I don't know Python well, but I suspect it's also
fairly easy in Python. I'd have a hard time doing FP in Perl, although
I'm sure it's *possible*, and of course, *anything* is possible in C++.
:)

--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC(P)
http://borasky-research.blogspot.com/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.
5c2285f675ad99d67216b8d4f547ac8a?d=identicon&s=25 Jamie Macey (Guest)
on 2006-12-30 20:18
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/29/06, pat eyler <pat.eyler@gmail.com> wrote:
> It looks like there's a cool programming contest scheduled for New Year's Eve:
> http://opc.kurukshetra.org.in/opc/
>
>  a $1,000 first prize, a $500 second prize, and 5 x $100 third prizes.
>
> I'm not sure which timezone this is actually happening in, as it's
> based in India,
> but it looks pretty cool nonetheless.

Sadly, I lost the ability to be productive coding between 12:30 and
6:30am about three years ago, otherwise I'd give it a shot.

It did get me thinking about organizing a ruby coding contest for the
community, though.  Limit to Ruby only, similar organization/scoring
to this one (6 problems worth points, bonus points for the
smallest/fastest/least memory on each problem) and do cash prizes.  I
don't have $1500 to put up for prizes, but if a $5 admission was
organized, 30 people could make a $75/$50/$25 prize split.

Would anyone be interested in participating in such a contest?

- Jamie
3bb23e7770680ea44a2d79e6d10daaed?d=identicon&s=25 M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2006-12-30 21:39
(Received via mailing list)
Jamie Macey wrote:
>
> Would anyone be interested in participating in such a contest?
>
> - Jamie
>
>
I personally think "competitive programming" is an abomination.
Programming is all about cooperation and communication, about helping
people learn a difficult art and science, and about producing worthwhile
artifacts. Maybe I thought differently when I was 19, fresh out of
college and programming for a living, but it didn't take long for that
to get beaten out of me. :)

--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC(P)
http://borasky-research.blogspot.com/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.
4299e35bacef054df40583da2d51edea?d=identicon&s=25 James Gray (bbazzarrakk)
on 2006-12-30 21:55
(Received via mailing list)
On Dec 30, 2006, at 2:38 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

> I personally think "competitive programming" is an abomination.
> Programming is all about cooperation and communication, about
> helping people learn a difficult art and science, and about
> producing worthwhile artifacts. Maybe I thought differently when I
> was 19, fresh out of college and programming for a living, but it
> didn't take long for that to get beaten out of me. :)

I'm 30 and I love a good programming contest.  I always learn so much
from everyone you is so much better at it than me and that's all it
takes to win me over.

I'm all for such a contest and will participate if my schedule allows.

James Edward Gray II
2ee1a7960cc761a6e92efb5000c0f2c9?d=identicon&s=25 William James (Guest)
on 2006-12-30 22:01
(Received via mailing list)
Jamie Macey wrote:
> Sadly, I lost the ability to be productive coding between 12:30 and
> 6:30am about three years ago, otherwise I'd give it a shot.
>
> It did get me thinking about organizing a ruby coding contest for the
> community, though.  Limit to Ruby only, similar organization/scoring
> to this one (6 problems worth points, bonus points for the
> smallest/fastest/least memory on each problem) and do cash prizes.  I
> don't have $1500 to put up for prizes, but if a $5 admission was
> organized, 30 people could make a $75/$50/$25 prize split.

No cash prizes are needed.  We'll compete for the laurel wreath.
B09f99b655b96fd4130aafd04531f6f1?d=identicon&s=25 Eric I. (Guest)
on 2007-01-01 17:41
(Received via mailing list)
William James wrote:
> pat eyler wrote:
> >From the site:
> "You are given N integer numbers. Choose thee of them which give
> maximum product."
>
> I don't get it.  Isn't this the same as finding the 3 largest numbers?

Well, consider this list of numbers:

    5, 5, 10, -10, -10

The product of the three largest numbers (those closest to positive
infinity) is 250.  But the highest product is 1000 that you'd get from
10, -10, and -10.  Pairs of negative numbers become significant.

So the simplest algorithm would be along these lines:

    * sort the numbers
    * calculate the product of the three highest numbers
    * calculate the product of the one highest and the two lowest
    * compare those two products and choose the larger

Eric
B09f99b655b96fd4130aafd04531f6f1?d=identicon&s=25 Eric I. (Guest)
on 2007-01-01 17:51
(Received via mailing list)
For those in the western hemisphere who elected not to pariticpate due
to having to code in the wee hours, you missed nothing.  The contest
had to be cancelled because they couldn't keep the server running.
They've suggested they might try again at a later date.

Eric
----
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