Forum: Ruby After Completing Ruby

Be955f2578b8971802ceab589fe24ad3?d=identicon&s=25 Suresh Ilankovan (sureshhey)
on 2016-12-17 06:13
Now i got this tools for my ruby on rails:
agile web development with rails 5
RUBY ON RAILS TUTORIAL (RAILS 5) by Michael Hartl


Is there all for rails to start making your websites? i know you must
keep on practicing to be perfect. 2 books enough to start making
websites or would you guys recommend me more? I tried finding learn
rails the hard way. but could not find
0fa73332c8e4a3b06ea439fd3f034322?d=identicon&s=25 Ronald Fischer (rovf)
on 2016-12-19 13:18
From the Ruby point of view, I found the tutorial by Hartl sufficient.
Of course you will need knowledge in HTML, CSS and maybe SCSS, but this
is a different issue.
Be955f2578b8971802ceab589fe24ad3?d=identicon&s=25 Suresh Ilankovan (sureshhey)
on 2016-12-20 07:34
Ronald Fischer wrote in post #1185366:
> From the Ruby point of view, I found the tutorial by Hartl sufficient.
> Of course you will need knowledge in HTML, CSS and maybe SCSS, but this
> is a different issue.

From ruby point of view:
I have read the book by peter cooper
completed codeacademy
in the process of doing learnrubythehardway.

Is that enough for ruby?  What about rails?
0fa73332c8e4a3b06ea439fd3f034322?d=identicon&s=25 Ronald Fischer (rovf)
on 2016-12-20 09:53
I meant "Rails, from the Ruby point of view". For this, Hartl is great.
Of course when you are writing ERB templates, you need other knowledge
too (maybe even Javascript), but how much this is necessary, depends on
how fancy your website is going to be.
Be955f2578b8971802ceab589fe24ad3?d=identicon&s=25 Suresh Ilankovan (sureshhey)
on 2016-12-20 13:30
Ronald Fischer wrote in post #1185368:
> I meant "Rails, from the Ruby point of view". For this, Hartl is great.
> Of course when you are writing ERB templates, you need other knowledge
> too (maybe even Javascript), but how much this is necessary, depends on
> how fancy your website is going to be.

Ok Thx for your opinion. But i would like to ask just for rails
agile web development with rails 5
RUBY ON RAILS TUTORIAL (RAILS 5) by Michael Hartl

is it more than enough just for this 2 books?
I don't want to read so many books just for rails. What i prefer is just
a few books then i would practice more. What's your opinion
0fa73332c8e4a3b06ea439fd3f034322?d=identicon&s=25 Ronald Fischer (rovf)
on 2016-12-20 15:07
My opinion is that you should start your rails project. You don't get
experience by reading books, but by doing practical work.
Be955f2578b8971802ceab589fe24ad3?d=identicon&s=25 Suresh Ilankovan (sureshhey)
on 2016-12-20 15:42
Ronald Fischer wrote in post #1185372:
> My opinion is that you should start your rails project. You don't get
> experience by reading books, but by doing practical work.

Ya like what i said practice more should be fine to me though. But my
plan is that i want to fully understand ruby than i head to rails to
learn and build websites. :) My end goal is to make websites. haha
4828d528e2e46f7c8160c336eb332836?d=identicon&s=25 Robert Heiler (shevegen)
on 2016-12-22 14:53
> But my plan is that i want to fully understand ruby than i
> head to rails to learn and build websites. :) My end goal
> is to make websites.

I don't think you need to "fully" understand ruby, just get
to a point where you can be sufficiently productive. The
best way is to write something on your own, ideally something
that is of medium size; something you can finish in a week
or at maximum, two weeks, even for a newcomer. Like tic tac
toe on the commandline or even something simpler.

Rails requires more knowledge in general; you sorta need to
understand ruby at the least to the point of where you can
debug what is going on in your app. Javascript, SQL (even
though it is hidden behind abstraction, you should know how
a SQL database works and how ruby/rails interfaces with it).

I found the ruby books in general ok, the rails books fairly
boring. But the rails tutorials are sort of ok-ish. I remember
that I did that one tutorial where you built some simple
forum or something like that; or at the least something where
you could write/post/edit content. Have a look at these
tutorials, they may be easier. The rails books aren't that
great IMO, I found them all very boring so I never finished
any of them before I eventually gave up. :(

(I do however had collect information locally and store that
in some way that is easy for me to digest/understand.)
Be955f2578b8971802ceab589fe24ad3?d=identicon&s=25 Suresh Ilankovan (sureshhey)
on 2016-12-26 17:16
Robert Heiler wrote in post #1185381:
>> But my plan is that i want to fully understand ruby than i
>> head to rails to learn and build websites. :) My end goal
>> is to make websites.
>
> I don't think you need to "fully" understand ruby, just get
> to a point where you can be sufficiently productive. The
> best way is to write something on your own, ideally something
> that is of medium size; something you can finish in a week
> or at maximum, two weeks, even for a newcomer. Like tic tac
> toe on the commandline or even something simpler.
>
> Rails requires more knowledge in general; you sorta need to
> understand ruby at the least to the point of where you can
> debug what is going on in your app. Javascript, SQL (even
> though it is hidden behind abstraction, you should know how
> a SQL database works and how ruby/rails interfaces with it).
>
> I found the ruby books in general ok, the rails books fairly
> boring. But the rails tutorials are sort of ok-ish. I remember
> that I did that one tutorial where you built some simple
> forum or something like that; or at the least something where
> you could write/post/edit content. Have a look at these
> tutorials, they may be easier. The rails books aren't that
> great IMO, I found them all very boring so I never finished
> any of them before I eventually gave up. :(
>
> (I do however had collect information locally and store that
> in some way that is easy for me to digest/understand.)


Honestly asking. I have read on google that they are saying rails is
easy to learn and build websites very fast is it really true? i
understand ruby syntax is easy to understand.
0fa73332c8e4a3b06ea439fd3f034322?d=identicon&s=25 Ronald Fischer (rovf)
on 2016-12-31 08:18
"Easy" is always a relative term. It depends on what you compare it to.

I found that Rails makes it easy to "produce a website".

Making a decent, sufficiently non-trivial, website is not easy with
*any* tool.

Ronald
Be955f2578b8971802ceab589fe24ad3?d=identicon&s=25 Suresh Ilankovan (sureshhey)
on 2016-12-31 11:59
Ronald Fischer wrote in post #1185410:
> "Easy" is always a relative term. It depends on what you compare it to.
>
> I found that Rails makes it easy to "produce a website".
>
> Making a decent, sufficiently non-trivial, website is not easy with
> *any* tool.
>
> Ronald

Thx for your info. :)
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