Forum: Ruby on Rails Which Linux flavor for a Rails server?

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0fcceb8cbefc2b99369fe7ba676d4384?d=identicon&s=25 Eric Beland (Guest)
on 2006-05-13 15:38
(Received via mailing list)
Hi folks,

I'm a linux noob, and I'm trying to pick a distro for my rails server.
I
don't want to start a flame-war about linux distros!  I'm interested in
the
best distribution for these criteria:

1 - Simplicity of getting ruby and rails set-up (gem updates)
2 - Stability (it is a server, after all)
3 - Support resources (community, and as a fall-back, paid support
available)
4 - Ability to work with Capistrano

I have been considering Debian because of it's stability.  However, I'm
wondering what difficulties I will have getting the latest and greatest
rails and ruby onto it... Any help is appreciated!!!  Thanks,

Eric
B780ee0ee1480454a85df58536702f63?d=identicon&s=25 Alder Green (Guest)
on 2006-05-13 16:00
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/13/06, Eric Beland <ebeland@gmail.com> wrote:
> 4 - Ability to work with Capistrano
>
> I have been considering Debian because of it's stability.  However, I'm
> wondering what difficulties I will have getting the latest and greatest
> rails and ruby onto it... Any help is appreciated!!!  Thanks,
>
> Eric

I'm using Debian stable ("Sarge") and I like it.  You don't have to
worry about "getting the latest and greatest rails" since Rails itself
is installed by gems, which is an autonomous packaging system
unrelated to apt-get and the whole stable/unstable issue.

I did however need to build Ruby 1.8.4 myself since it wasn't
available for Sarge and I wanted that. I also built PostrgesSQL 8.1.3
for the same reason. Looking back on it, I should have used
http://backports.org/. Though I guess it would be a hassle anyway,
particularly considering this is the production box and everything
absolutely must work without glitches.

So, the need to compile Ruby 1.8.4 and PostgresSQL were a con. I wish
there was a simpler way: it took several hours, and after viewing all
those build outputs whiz by, I came out of there with a strong sense
of "what the hell happened there?!".

But besides that, Debian treated me good.
A4a8fefcbd2cd6d2370609a5e2a3a389?d=identicon&s=25 Rob Merrell (Guest)
on 2006-05-13 17:41
(Received via mailing list)
One thing to consider when running a production server is that "latest
and
greatest" isn't usually the best idea.  I have found that when a new
version
of something is marked stable, it usually isn't for the first few weeks
or
month.  Rails 1.1 is a good example, after it was released as stable a
few
bugs were found and in the following weeks it saw its way up to 1.1.2.

Back to the subject though I would agree that Debian or one of its
variants
would be the best idea.  Ubuntu would be a good choice because they have
Ruby 1.8.4, ruby-mysql, rmagick and imagemagick in their package repos.
The
company I work for hosts everything on Red Hat ESL.  I would strongly
recommend staying away from this one.  I had to compile everything by
hand
because they only keep really old software in their repos (Ruby 1.6).

My $0.02

Rob
30269682335f1fb247d71969fa715b5e?d=identicon&s=25 Roberto Saccon (rsaccon)
on 2006-05-13 17:47
(Received via mailing list)
My experience with  Debian sarge was similar. I believe it is the most
simple distro to set up and to maintain.  I first installed Xen and have
my
stuff runing on a virtual machine. Like this, if you need a second
server to
test out something, just start up another virtual machine and if it
makes
sense for you, you can even seperate DB and app server into different
virtual machines. The biggest issue I had, was to set up Lighty
1.4.11configured as reverse proxy for dynamic content and with
caching. (and
mod_compress still  doesn't work in my setup for virtual domains).

But there are backports, there is Google, and if everything fails, you
can
compile form source ..

Roberto
C1e5a9e9344b6d31b9df7303e6dc378a?d=identicon&s=25 Craig White (Guest)
on 2006-05-13 18:48
(Received via mailing list)
Just an FYI - http://dev.centos.org has updated rpm's for ruby (1.8.4)
and can be installed easily on RHEL.

Craig
D566a291d8ee7c013649e47b3769d981?d=identicon&s=25 Carl Lerche (Guest)
on 2006-05-13 21:44
(Received via mailing list)
Unless you have a reason to use linux, you might also want to
consider FreeBSD. I've never really been a system administrator, but
have been successfully (by my criteria) managing my servers. I find
that it's really easy to get software installed using the ports
system and the freebsd site has great documentation. Not to mention
that FreeBSD is known to be stable. As for support, I've always found
all my answers somewhere in the community and never looked into paid
support, however good paid support is always available somewhere.

-carl
8acba6d057b3f0c2c16cca95ad36881b?d=identicon&s=25 Bakki Kudva (bakki)
on 2006-05-14 18:03
(Received via mailing list)
Just a note on building Ruby-1.8.4 on Sarge. The good folks on
Debian-Ruby list helped me with this and it worked like a charm for
me.

The steps are:

- Add an unstable deb-src line to sources.list.
- Update and get the source pkg (apt-get source ruby1.8).
- Install the build-depends of ruby1.8 (apt-get build-dep ruby1.8).
- Install devscripts.
- cd ruby1.8; debuild -us -uc (don't do this as root since bebuild
will complain)
- You get the following debs.

irb1.8_1.8.4-2_all.deb                libtcltk-ruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb
libdbm-ruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb       rdoc1.8_1.8.4-2_all.deb
libgdbm-ruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb      ri1.8_1.8.4-2_all.deb
libopenssl-ruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb   ruby1.8-dev_1.8.4-2_i386.deb
libreadline-ruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb  ruby1.8-elisp_1.8.4-2_all.deb
libruby1.8-dbg_1.8.4-2_i386.deb       ruby1.8-examples_1.8.4-2_all.deb
libruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb           ruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb

- Install the debs  (following the instructions in Debian Reference on
installing local debs)

-bakki



On 5/13/06, Alder Green <alder.green@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 5/13/06, Eric Beland <ebeland@gmail.com> wrote:
...
B780ee0ee1480454a85df58536702f63?d=identicon&s=25 Alder Green (Guest)
on 2006-05-14 20:11
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/14/06, Bakki Kudva <bakki.kudva@gmail.com> wrote:
> - cd ruby1.8; debuild -us -uc (don't do this as root since bebuild
>
> > So, the need to compile Ruby 1.8.4 and PostgresSQL were a con. I wish
> > there was a simpler way: it took several hours, and after viewing all
> > those build outputs whiz by, I came out of there with a strong sense
> > of "what the hell happened there?!".

Great. I'll have a look at this the next time I need to build Ruby on
Debian Stable (i.e. towards the end of this month [RoR is
flourishing!] ;).

Also, the OP - and anyone else deploying on Debian - should take a
look at The Perfect Rails Stack kindly provided by Ezra Zygmuntowicz:
http://brainspl.at/rails_stack.html
30ee518e6fdc5b07e060775b5a542bdb?d=identicon&s=25 Jón Borgþórsson (jongretar)
on 2006-05-14 20:33
(Received via mailing list)
I have been using Centos for all my servers. Stable and good.

On 5/14/06, Alder Green <alder.green@gmail.com> wrote:
> > - Install devscripts.
> > libruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb           ruby1.8_1.8.4-2_i386.deb
> > ...
> look at The Perfect Rails Stack kindly provided by Ezra Zygmuntowicz:
> http://brainspl.at/rails_stack.html
>
> --
> -Alder
> _______________________________________________
> Rails mailing list
> Rails@lists.rubyonrails.org
> http://lists.rubyonrails.org/mailman/listinfo/rails
>


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