Forum: Ruby on Rails Picking apart the rails codebase / transitioning from novice

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Ea5036994d8e3d00fe4c9ede36c2d05a?d=identicon&s=25 Mike (Guest)
on 2006-03-24 03:49
Alright, I've done some tinkering and I've read through the DHH book.

I'd like to humbly solicit some advice from the rails gurus.

I'd like to get a real firm grip, and it seems that navigating the
actual codebase might be the best course of action.

Any advice as to the best route to take for maximum comprehension? What
would be the most sensible way to tackle the different components?

In addition, what does a 'day in the life' of a rails guru look like?
How do you stay current? Do you read the actual commit diffs? The recent
changes? Subscribe to the wiki RSS?

In other words, outside of raw experience, what does the behavioral
transition from 'novice' look like?

Thanks
3dd4b52a0946bd698b1d1635a46ea3a3?d=identicon&s=25 François Beausoleil (fbeausoleil)
on 2006-03-24 03:56
(Received via mailing list)
2006/3/23, Mike <spam@spam.com>:
> In other words, outside of raw experience, what does the behavioral
> transition from 'novice' look like?

Coding applications ?  Finding bugs, entering the Rails source code to
find the source of the bug, producing patches.  That's about it, I
guess.  I never set myself to read the whole code base - there's just
too much code in there.

I stay current by being active on the mailing list, following blogs
around the world, and subscribing to the Rails Trac feeds: changesets
and patches.

Hope that helps !
5301cef77ec4942463fae0ba820b6b57?d=identicon&s=25 Tim Case (Guest)
on 2006-03-24 06:08
(Received via mailing list)
Honestly, the straight dope is that it takes time, the most important
thing
is to view the process as a journey, everybody starts off in the same
place
- not knowing a thing about either Rails or about Ruby, and then goes
from
there to knowing a little bit more each day.  My recommendation is to
give
yourself some time to learn, succeed, and totally $#!$ things up, Rails
definitely makes big things happen dramatically but that's not to say
that
it's easy or doesn't take a lot of effort to learn.  Rails is built on
the
idea of conventions and there is no way you are going to learn these
conventions without spending time on them, additionally Ruby takes a
long
time to completely grok and if you are coming from a static language
environment, it may confound you with it's mysteries that  will seem as
alien as the arches of Atlantis but slowly over time you'll be enchanted
by
it's magic.

Once you get past the initial discomfort you'll find yourself at the
entrance to a road with a thousand paths and each one of them offers
something to learn about Rails, software development, and the practice
of
programming in general, and by this time you are well on your way down
the
road of Ruby riches only at this point you will not care where you end
up,
only that you can continue with no end, and if you should venture so far
that you come to where the Ruby meets the sea...

Why the poignant will post something on Redhanded.com that will make you
say
WTF?

And you'll start all over again...

1) Read AWDWROR
2) Get Pickaxe and learn Ruby independent of Rails
3) Do the tutorial
4) Dream up an app
5) Start building it.
6) Get confused
7) Feel the urge to want to get help
8) Don't
9) Figure out the solution
10) Feel the urge again to want to get help on something else
11) Do
12) Look at the source to learn more about Rails and Ruby
13) Ask yourself what you know about blocks and metaprogramming
14) Look around smell the roses and all of sudden realize that you are a
much different developer than when you first started
15) Profit

Takes about 3 - 12 months...

Welcome to the show.
8e44c65ac5b896da534ef2440121c953?d=identicon&s=25 Ezra Zygmuntowicz (Guest)
on 2006-03-24 06:20
(Received via mailing list)
On Mar 23, 2006, at 9:07 PM, Tim Case wrote:

> Ruby takes a long time to completely grok and if you are coming
> no end, and if you should venture so far that you come to where the
> 4) Dream up an app
> are a much different developer than when you first started
> 15) Profit
>
> Takes about 3 - 12 months...
>
> Welcome to the show.
> _______________________________________________
> Rails mailing list
> Rails@lists.rubyonrails.org
> http://lists.rubyonrails.org/mailman/listinfo/rails

Haha!  ++
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