Forum: Ruby Ruby jargon and slang

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C1bcb559f87f356698cfad9f6d630235?d=identicon&s=25 Hal Fulton (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 03:03
(Received via mailing list)
I'm assembling a list of Ruby community "usages" and I want to make
sure I haven't missed anything important.

I have such things as: duck typing, threequal, spaceship operator,
singleton method, singleton class, splat or unary unarray,
multiple or parallel assignment, and (ehh) eigenclass.

Not all usages are considered official or will necessarily be
treated equally.

Terms that are extremely common outside our community and are used
identically can probably be omitted from the list.

Anyone?


Hal
5c7bdd14d6885c8275eaf78be41d120a?d=identicon&s=25 Eero Saynatkari (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 04:12
(Received via mailing list)
On 2006.02.06 10:58, Hal Fulton wrote:
> I'm assembling a list of Ruby community "usages" and I want to make
> sure I haven't missed anything important.
>
> I have such things as: duck typing, threequal, spaceship operator,
> singleton method, singleton class, splat or unary unarray,
> multiple or parallel assignment, and (ehh) eigenclass.

'threequal' == ===? I call it the sort-of-matches-operator but
I assume that is just me.

> Not all usages are considered official or will necessarily be
> treated equally.
>
> Terms that are extremely common outside our community and are used
> identically can probably be omitted from the list.
>
> Anyone?
>
>
> Hal


E
F0223b1193ecc3a935ce41a1edd72e42?d=identicon&s=25 zdennis (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 10:38
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Hal Fulton wrote:
> Terms that are extremely common outside our community and are used
> identically can probably be omitted from the list.
>
> Anyone?
>
>

um... the push operator <<

some folks call it the less-than-less-than thing, but that seems soo
long.

Zach
5befe95e6648daec3dd5728cd36602d0?d=identicon&s=25 Robert Klemme (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 11:38
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zdennis wrote:
>>
>> Terms that are extremely common outside our community and are used
>> identically can probably be omitted from the list.
>>
>> Anyone?
>>
>>
>
> um... the push operator <<

Isn't that the bit shift operator? :-)

> some folks call it the less-than-less-than thing, but that seems soo
> long.

    robert
C1bcb559f87f356698cfad9f6d630235?d=identicon&s=25 Hal Fulton (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 12:51
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zdennis wrote:
>
> um... the push operator <<
>
> some folks call it the less-than-less-than thing, but that seems soo long.

Noted. I usually call it the append operator.

Hal
149379873fe2cb70e550c6bff8fedd0c?d=identicon&s=25 Jeffrey Schwab (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 14:58
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Hal Fulton wrote:
> zdennis wrote:
>
>>
>> um... the push operator <<
>>
>> some folks call it the less-than-less-than thing, but that seems soo
>> long.
>
>
> Noted. I usually call it the append operator.

In C++, it's often called the insertion operator.  I have been thinking
of it as such in Ruby.
912c61d9da47754de7039f4271334a9f?d=identicon&s=25 unknown (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 18:02
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Quoting Hal Fulton <hal9000@hypermetrics.com>:

> I'm assembling a list of Ruby community "usages" and I want to
> make sure I haven't missed anything important.
>
> I have such things as: duck typing, threequal, spaceship
> operator, singleton method, singleton class, splat or unary
> unarray, multiple or parallel assignment, and (ehh) eigenclass.

You've neglected chunky bacon.

-mental
70c8da82d09d3866222976ab8978133c?d=identicon&s=25 Daniel Nugent (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 22:53
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Chunky Bacon isn't jargon, it's a battle cry.
A16652fd5d83c0473bd1e39d9a2117a6?d=identicon&s=25 Dirk Meijer (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 22:56
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2006/2/6, Daniel Nugent <nugend@gmail.com>:
>
> Chunky Bacon isn't jargon, it's a battle cry.


should be in there anyway ;-)
Bc6d88907ce09158581fbb9b469a35a3?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2006-02-06 23:08
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Dirk Meijer wrote:
> 2006/2/6, Daniel Nugent <nugend@gmail.com>:
>
>>Chunky Bacon isn't jargon, it's a battle cry.
>
>
>
> should be in there anyway ;-)
>

What is it?

I mean, besides a shibboleth.
31af45939fec7e3c4ed8a798c0bd9b1a?d=identicon&s=25 Matthew Smillie (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 01:24
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On Feb 6, 2006, at 13:58, Jeffrey Schwab wrote:

> Hal Fulton wrote:
>> zdennis wrote:
>>> um... the push operator <<
>>>
>>> some folks call it the less-than-less-than thing, but that seems
>>> soo long.
>> Noted. I usually call it the append operator.
>
> In C++, it's often called the insertion operator.  I have been
> thinking of it as such in Ruby.

So, if it operates like a duck...
149379873fe2cb70e550c6bff8fedd0c?d=identicon&s=25 Jeffrey Schwab (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 02:44
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Matthew Smillie wrote:
>>>
>>> Noted. I usually call it the append operator.
>>
>>
>> In C++, it's often called the insertion operator.  I have been
>> thinking of it as such in Ruby.
>
>
> So, if it operates like a duck...

Exactly.

I never understand why people think of duck typing as being unique to
dynamic languages.  C++ has great support for static, generic
programming, and a lot of what Ruby does at run-time, C++ can do at
compile-time.

Of course, Ruby has plenty of advantages of its own. :)
C1bcb559f87f356698cfad9f6d630235?d=identicon&s=25 Hal Fulton (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 05:30
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James Britt wrote:
>>
>
> What is it?
>
> I mean, besides a shibboleth.
>

Nothing more, I'd guess.

"Shibboleth" is also a shibboleth, I guess. Rather
self-referential.


Hal
Bc6d88907ce09158581fbb9b469a35a3?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 05:46
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Hal Fulton wrote:
> self-referential.
Good catch!


--
James Britt

"Blanket statements are over-rated"
2cf6d8e639314abd751f83a72e9a2ac5?d=identicon&s=25 Martin DeMello (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 11:00
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Hal Fulton <hal9000@hypermetrics.com> wrote:
>
> "Shibboleth" is also a shibboleth, I guess. Rather
> self-referential.

More etymology than self-reference - "a shibboleth" is simply a word
that fulfils the same role "shibboleth" did in its original context.

martin
E34b5cae57e0dd170114dba444e37852?d=identicon&s=25 Logan Capaldo (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 19:41
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On Feb 7, 2006, at 4:58 AM, Martin DeMello wrote:

> Hal Fulton <hal9000@hypermetrics.com> wrote:
>>
>> "Shibboleth" is also a shibboleth, I guess. Rather
>> self-referential.
>
> More etymology than self-reference - "a shibboleth" is simply a word
> that fulfils the same role "shibboleth" did in its original context.
>
> martin
>

Everytime I see "shibboleth" all I can think of is HP Lovecraft.

ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn
9358cc96c46055cd68d4a76a9aefe026?d=identicon&s=25 Daniel Harple (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 21:13
(Received via mailing list)
On Feb 6, 2006, at 2:58 AM, Hal Fulton wrote:

> I'm assembling a list of Ruby community "usages" and I want to make
> sure I haven't missed anything important.

Bang methods, like Array#reject!.

-- Daniel
430ea1cba106cc65b7687d66e9df4f06?d=identicon&s=25 David Vallner (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 21:26
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DÅ?a Utorok 07 Február 2006 01:22 Matthew Smillie napísal:
> So, if it operates like a duck...

So, from duck typing, we've come to duck surgery? *shudder*

VOTE ME for worst pun ever.

David Vallner
31af45939fec7e3c4ed8a798c0bd9b1a?d=identicon&s=25 Matthew Smillie (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 21:32
(Received via mailing list)
On Feb 7, 2006, at 20:10, Daniel Harple wrote:

> On Feb 6, 2006, at 2:58 AM, Hal Fulton wrote:
>
>> I'm assembling a list of Ruby community "usages" and I want to make
>> sure I haven't missed anything important.
>
> Bang methods, like Array#reject!.

Which reminds me, the #-notation for methods would make a good
inclusion if it's not already there.
F3b7b8756d0c7f71cc7460cc33aefaee?d=identicon&s=25 Daniel Berger (Guest)
on 2006-02-07 21:35
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David Vallner wrote:
> DÅ?a Utorok 07 Február 2006 01:22 Matthew Smillie napísal:
>
>>So, if it operates like a duck...
>
>
> So, from duck typing, we've come to duck surgery? *shudder*

They don't call those doctors "quacks" for nothing.

Dan
C1bcb559f87f356698cfad9f6d630235?d=identicon&s=25 Hal Fulton (Guest)
on 2006-02-08 02:14
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Logan Capaldo wrote:
>> More etymology than self-reference - "a shibboleth" is simply a word
>> that fulfils the same role "shibboleth" did in its original context.
>>
>> martin
>>
>
> Everytime I see "shibboleth" all I can think of is HP Lovecraft.

Haha! No doubt HPL was influenced by real languages and words.

> ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn

If I may cut and paste... I saw a T-shirt recently like this:

                       WHICH PART OF
      ph'nglui mglw'nafh Cthulhu R'lyeh wgah'nagl fhtagn
                   DON'T YOU UNDERSTAND?


And a similar one with Schroedinger's Equations...


Hal
C1bcb559f87f356698cfad9f6d630235?d=identicon&s=25 Hal Fulton (Guest)
on 2006-02-08 02:17
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Daniel Harple wrote:
> On Feb 6, 2006, at 2:58 AM, Hal Fulton wrote:
>
>> I'm assembling a list of Ruby community "usages" and I want to make
>> sure I haven't missed anything important.
>
>
> Bang methods, like Array#reject!.

True. But I'm tired of adding stuff, so this one will probably
have to slip through the cracks.

As long as people know what bang means, it's obvious.


Hal
C6eb5252ee440a2bde0339f2caf614ca?d=identicon&s=25 Mark Szpakowski (Guest)
on 2006-02-08 05:20
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Can someone point me to the page in the Pickaxe book where #-notation
is defined? I can't find it through the index.
430ea1cba106cc65b7687d66e9df4f06?d=identicon&s=25 David Vallner (Guest)
on 2006-02-08 22:42
(Received via mailing list)
DÅ?a Streda 08 Február 2006 05:18 Mark Szpakowski napísal:
> Can someone point me to the page in the Pickaxe book where #-notation
> is defined? I can't find it through the index.

That notation is defined in Pickaxe? Now this I want to see.

David Vallner
52a177e9dbd3e614825aabc4e45f8cd6?d=identicon&s=25 Mark Volkmann (Guest)
on 2006-02-08 22:54
(Received via mailing list)
On 2/8/06, David Vallner <david@vallner.net> wrote:
> Dòa Streda 08 Február 2006 05:18 Mark Szpakowski napísal:
> > Can someone point me to the page in the Pickaxe book where #-notation
> > is defined? I can't find it through the index.
>
> That notation is defined in Pickaxe? Now this I want to see.

See the "Notation Conventions" section in the Preface. In my copy of
Pickaxe 2 it's on page xxix.
430ea1cba106cc65b7687d66e9df4f06?d=identicon&s=25 David Vallner (Guest)
on 2006-02-09 01:59
(Received via mailing list)
Dòa Streda 08 Február 2006 22:53 Mark Volkmann napísal:
> --
> R. Mark Volkmann
> Partner, Object Computing, Inc.

See? Found it :P

I was a bit confused by you using the word "defined", I'd probably say
"described", since Pickaxe isn't the reference document for conventions
like
this. Then again, it just might be, I can't recall how the notation (or
its
use in Ruby) originated and whether it was somehow canonized.

David Vallner
E34b5cae57e0dd170114dba444e37852?d=identicon&s=25 Logan Capaldo (Guest)
on 2006-02-09 02:08
(Received via mailing list)
On Feb 8, 2006, at 7:59 PM, David Vallner wrote:

>> Pickaxe 2 it's on page xxix.
> this. Then again, it just might be, I can't recall how the notation
> (or its
> use in Ruby) originated and whether it was somehow canonized.
>
> David Vallner
>

Does ri count as canonical? It comes with ruby correct? And it uses
the '#' notation.
430ea1cba106cc65b7687d66e9df4f06?d=identicon&s=25 David Vallner (Guest)
on 2006-02-09 02:34
(Received via mailing list)
DÅ?a Å tvrtok 09 Február 2006 02:07 Logan Capaldo napísal:
> >> See the "Notation Conventions" section in the Preface. In my copy of
> > conventions like
> > this. Then again, it just might be, I can't recall how the notation
> > (or its
> > use in Ruby) originated and whether it was somehow canonized.
> >
> > David Vallner
>
> Does ri count as canonical? It comes with ruby correct? And it uses
> the '#' notation.

Well, ri might just be following a convention that's been in use before
the
tool existed. Not like I'd know. I was just wondering whether the
notation is
just some extremely widespread bandwagon that sort of emerged and became
universally accepted, or if there was some "official" wossname that
defined
the notation in the stricter meaning of "defined", Or c) It doesn't
really
matter and I'm nitpicking because I should really go to sleep for a
change.

Ah well. I'm not actually trying to (surprise!) make a point or
anything...
However, if someone -does- know the history of the notation, it'd be
interesting trivia to know.

David Vallner
4feed660d3728526797edeb4f0467384?d=identicon&s=25 Bill Kelly (Guest)
on 2006-02-09 03:11
(Received via mailing list)
From: "David Vallner" david@vallner.net
>
> Then again, it just might be, I can't recall how the notation (or its
> use in Ruby) originated and whether it was somehow canonized.

I first encountered the Class#instance_method notation in Smalltalk,
which I'd been learning for a few months prior to encountering Ruby.

I figured it came from Smalltalk but I don't really know . . .



Regards,

Bill
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