Forum: Rails I18n Translation in translationvariable

309043119cd9890511b47c3bb51bce69?d=identicon&s=25 Philip K. (Guest)
on 2010-11-26 13:04
(Received via mailing list)
Hello,

i need some help I want to use a translation variable in neu
translation.
something like this code:

de:
  namespace: "Kunde"
  new:
    headline: "Kunden anlegen"
    submit: "t(namespace) anlegen"


please help me :D
402602a60e500e85f2f5dc1ff3648ecb?d=identicon&s=25 Sven Fuchs (Guest)
on 2010-11-26 16:31
(Received via mailing list)
Hey Philip,

tl;dr: you probably don't wanna do it.

DRY is a principle that applies to code but not translations. When we
abstract our code then we are the ones who are in control of applying
general rules to it. But when it comes to translations we must leave
your translators in control and therefor don't want to abstract
translations.

The reason for that is that

1. there aren't that many general rules that apply to language, all of
the time, spoken languages have tons of exceptions for probably any rule
you'd name
2. even if there are such rules we as developers don't know them -
that's why there are translators

Therefor one should allow translators to translate every single string
the way they want - even if there's tons of duplication then.

One practical example where what you're trying to do could potentially
crash on the floor is when your :namespace translation needs to be
inflected when it's interpolated (inserted) into this particular
translation for :submit in *this particular* context on your page.

That said, there are some situations where even Rails does something
similar.

You can do it like this:

de:
  new:
    submit: "%{namespace} anlegen"

and then

I18n.t(:'new.submit', :namespace => I18n.t(:namespace))
309043119cd9890511b47c3bb51bce69?d=identicon&s=25 Philip Kleimeyer (Guest)
on 2010-11-26 18:04
(Received via mailing list)
Hey Sven,

thanks a lot :D

I had just another problem.
How to act with partials in translations?

especially with the submit button:


here my problem:


# _form.html.erb

<%= form_for(@customer) do |f| %>
   #some code
   <%= f.submit t("new.submit")  %>
<% end %>


#locales/views/customers/de.yml

de:
  new:
    headline: "Kunden anlegen"
    submit: "Kunden anlegen"

  edit:
    headline: "Kunden bearbeiten"
    submit: "Kunden speichern"

How to set the buttons text depents on edit an new

<%= f.submit t("submit")  %>

thanks to you!

Philip

2010/11/26 Sven Fuchs <svenfuchs@artweb-design.de>
402602a60e500e85f2f5dc1ff3648ecb?d=identicon&s=25 Sven Fuchs (Guest)
on 2010-11-26 18:57
(Received via mailing list)
Just like Krzysztof I'd recommend checking out the Rails guide on
Internationalization. IIRC it answers both of the questions you've
asked.

You might want to check out the Rails "lazy" translation helper:

t('.submit')

Notice the dot at the beginning of the key. This dot is expanded to the
current view path, e.g. on "customers/_form" this key becomes
:'customers.form.submit'
390e714e320bd505fb5e9f762870ba5e?d=identicon&s=25 Krzysztof Knapik (Guest)
on 2010-11-27 08:00
(Received via mailing list)
Have you read i18n guide http://guides.rubyonrails.org/i18n.html  ?:)

2010/11/26 Philip K. <philip.kleimeyer@googlemail.com>:
>    submit: "t(namespace) anlegen"
>
>
> please help me :D
>
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D6158ccae0462937e532b880e181d8ee?d=identicon&s=25 Translate Humans (translatebyhumans)
on 2012-03-26 14:41
While we intangible our code then we are the ones who are in organize of
be relevant universal rules to it. But when it comes to translations we
must go away your translators in control and therefore don't want to
abstract
Translations.

Reason for that is that

1. There isn’t that a lot of all-purpose rules that pertain to verbal
communication, all of the time, spoken languages have plenty of
exceptions for almost certainly any rule you'd name
2. Even if there is such policy we as developers don't know them -
That’s why there are translators

Therefore one should agree to translators to translate every single cord
The way they want - even if there's heaps of repetition then.

http://www.translatebyhumans.com/
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