Forum: Ruby Any TextMate Editor equivelent for Windows ?

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F29c276b470890a36bcf54faed15c9d7?d=identicon&s=25 Jules (Guest)
on 2005-12-18 19:59
(Received via mailing list)
Hello

I am looking for a decent Ruby and RAILs editor.  (JEdit is not really
working out for me on Windows)

I notice that on the Ruby on Rails Demos (Weblog and Flicker)  the guys
are using TextMate ( on MAC OS ?)  It seems pretty effective.

Any views or ideas of an equivelent to TextMate that runs on Windows !
( No I guess not !)

Cheers

Jules
7223c62b7310e164eb79c740188abbda?d=identicon&s=25 Xavier Noria (Guest)
on 2005-12-18 20:11
(Received via mailing list)
On Dec 18, 2005, at 19:57, Jules wrote:

> ( No I guess not !)
Eclipse + RadRails is a good environment and is portable, check out
this demo:

     http://download.radrails.org/video/RadRails_Import.mov

In my opinion the plugin needs yet some iteration, but works great
already.

-- fxn
Bc6d88907ce09158581fbb9b469a35a3?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2005-12-18 20:35
(Received via mailing list)
Jules wrote:
> Hello
>
> I am looking for a decent Ruby and RAILs editor.  (JEdit is not really
> working out for me on Windows)
>
> I notice that on the Ruby on Rails Demos (Weblog and Flicker)  the guys
> are using TextMate ( on MAC OS ?)  It seems pretty effective.
>
> Any views or ideas of an equivelent to TextMate that runs on Windows !
> ( No I guess not !)

Not very  optimistic, are you?


What features of TextMate are you looking for?

(I'm quite happy using vim, Windows file manager, and a handful of
custom Ruby shell scripts and Unix command ports for finding and
manipulating stuff from the command line. If there's something else find
  I need to do at the command line, I can write a Ruby tool for it.  If
I want to extend vim, I can use Ruby to do it.  Works out well.)

James


--

http://www.ruby-doc.org       - Ruby Help & Documentation
http://www.artima.com/rubycs/ - Ruby Code & Style: Writers wanted
http://www.rubystuff.com      - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff
http://www.jamesbritt.com     - Playing with Better Toys
http://www.30secondrule.com   - Building Better Tools
9dfe8c734b0f9b37a4e218425c0a2138?d=identicon&s=25 Gene Tani (Guest)
on 2005-12-18 23:20
(Received via mailing list)
James Britt wrote:
> > ( No I guess not !)
> I want to extend vim, I can use Ruby to do it.  Works out well.)
> http://www.30secondrule.com   - Building Better Tools
There's been lots of positive discussions about lots of editors in
c.l.r: vim, emacs, komodo, eric, eclipse, arachno, scite, kate,
kdevelop, leo...
Cee0292fffa691f1fb320d5400200e99?d=identicon&s=25 Marcel Molina Jr. (Guest)
on 2005-12-18 23:20
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 03:57:46AM +0900, Jules wrote:
> I am looking for a decent Ruby and RAILs editor.  (JEdit is not really
> working out for me on Windows)
>
> I notice that on the Ruby on Rails Demos (Weblog and Flicker)  the guys
> are using TextMate ( on MAC OS ?)  It seems pretty effective.
>
> Any views or ideas of an equivelent to TextMate that runs on Windows !
> ( No I guess not !)

Although probably a more "heavyweight", the RadRails IDE (build on top
of
Eclipse) seems to be getting some traction.

http://www.radrails.org/

marcel
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-19 01:26
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 04:32:37AM +0900, James Britt wrote:
>
> (I'm quite happy using vim, Windows file manager, and a handful of
> custom Ruby shell scripts and Unix command ports for finding and
> manipulating stuff from the command line. If there's something else find

Care to share any details?

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
F29c276b470890a36bcf54faed15c9d7?d=identicon&s=25 Jules (Guest)
on 2005-12-19 17:32
(Received via mailing list)
Hello

Thanks for all the posts.  Lots of useful tips on various tools, shells
and multiple cmd line tools/scripts, rather than one big IDE/Tool. So
many different ideas and tools, but they tend to be orientated around
unix type midntset.

The problem is that I am not very smart or clever, so I have relied
upon C# and Visual Studio, which I find to be very robust. My ideal
would be Visual Studio for Ruby, even if it is a dynamic language
outside of the Managed code environment. Robust code completion and
generation tools.

If Ruby/Rails is to take off in a big way we need simple/ robust
development environment for us simple folk.  Just my view.

Jules
7223c62b7310e164eb79c740188abbda?d=identicon&s=25 Xavier Noria (Guest)
on 2005-12-19 17:39
(Received via mailing list)
On Dec 19, 2005, at 17:32, Jules wrote:

> Thanks for all the posts.  Lots of useful tips on various tools,
> shells
> and multiple cmd line tools/scripts, rather than one big IDE/Tool.

Well, someone mentioned Eclipse + RadRails, if Eclipse is something
that's big :-). If you are an IDE guy that combo is good.

-- fxn
4299e35bacef054df40583da2d51edea?d=identicon&s=25 James Gray (bbazzarrakk)
on 2005-12-19 18:12
(Received via mailing list)
On Dec 19, 2005, at 10:32 AM, Jules wrote:

> So many different ideas and tools, but they tend to be orientated
> around
> unix type midntset.

Well, Ruby grew up on Unix.  That an it's just a good mindset.  ;)

> The problem is that I am not very smart or clever, so I have relied
> upon C# and Visual Studio, which I find to be very robust.

Sure you are.  You're a programmer.  ;)

You've also located a nice support group for the hard parts...

> My ideal would be Visual Studio for Ruby, even if it is a dynamic
> language
> outside of the Managed code environment. Robust code completion and
> generation tools.
>
> If Ruby/Rails is to take off in a big way we need simple/ robust
> development environment for us simple folk.  Just my view.

Sadly, building these kinds of environments for Ruby are much harder
than they are for C#, because Ruby is so dynamic it's hard to make
safe assumptions about the code.  This is the most likely reason you
don't see Visual Studio equivalent tools for Ruby.

I know we do have some IDEs and I hope they will continue to improve
for those that prefer that method of coding.

James Edward Gray II
5fae52bb6ef81a988b84e4cf2b4258e1?d=identicon&s=25 Gary Allum (Guest)
on 2005-12-19 18:24
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, 19 Dec 2005 09:10:04 -0800, James Edward Gray II
<james@grayproductions.net> wrote:

>
> I know we do have some IDEs and I hope they will continue to improve for
> those that prefer that method of coding.
>
> James Edward Gray II
>
>

I know that for myself I have somewhat dedicated the last few days,
along
with a friend of mine, to trying out the IDE's that are out there; and
have unfortuantely been mostly disappointed, at least from a linux
standpoint.
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-19 21:22
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Dec 20, 2005 at 02:21:59AM +0900, Gary Allum wrote:
>
> I know that for myself I have somewhat dedicated the last few days, along
> with a friend of mine, to trying out the IDE's that are out there; and
> have unfortuantely been mostly disappointed, at least from a linux
> standpoint.

I always just kinda figured that Linux *is* my IDE.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
54079122b67de9677c1f93933ce8b63a?d=identicon&s=25 Mitchell Hashimoto (mitchellh)
on 2005-12-19 23:52
Jules wrote:
> The problem is that I am not very smart or clever, so I have relied
> upon C# and Visual Studio, which I find to be very robust. My ideal
> would be Visual Studio for Ruby, even if it is a dynamic language
> outside of the Managed code environment. Robust code completion and
> generation tools.
>
> If Ruby/Rails is to take off in a big way we need simple/ robust
> development environment for us simple folk.  Just my view.

Why do you need a big IDE? I just use editpad lite (for the tabbed file
viewing) without syntax highlighting or any of that fancy mumbo jumbo. I
also always have a command window open at the same time :) So I can run
my tests, start my server, etc.
25e11a00a89683f7e01e425a1a6e305c?d=identicon&s=25 Wilson Bilkovich (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 01:29
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/18/05, Jules <Roseanna80@hotmail.com> wrote:
>
I've used UltraEdit for a long time, and it's a great editor. It has
some nice 'project' features built in, but at its heart it's just a
lightweight text editor.  Unfortunately, its syntax highlighting
system just isn't powerful enough to handle Ruby, and definitely isn't
up to handling ERb / RHTML files.
Here's an example of what a text editor has to deal with:
var = 'example'
 print %Q- A fairly hard #{var}
 -#{This is a comment, not a variable}

So, in recent days, I've switched over to Vim, in the form of:
http://cream.sourceforge.net
I'm still getting used to it, and getting over the lack of tabs for my
open files, but so far the "Ruby compatibility" is much higher.  It
handles the highlighting for the above snippet of Ruby without any
difficulty.
D83785463666ae9bb98a0753eebc8950?d=identicon&s=25 Wayne Vucenic (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 03:26
(Received via mailing list)
Hi Jules,

> My ideal would be Visual Studio for Ruby

I'm a big fan of Visual Studio.  The closest thing I've been able to
find
for Ruby is ArachnoRuby:   www.ruby-ide.com

Sometimes I spend the day switching between Visual Studio (for C++
or C#) and ArachnoRuby, and it goes pretty smoothly.  I even find
myself wishing that Visual Studio had some of the features that
ArachnoRuby does (like triple-click to select a line.)

Wayne

---
Wayne Vucenic
No Bugs Software
"Ruby and C++ Agile Contract Programming in Silicon Valley"
083c7b239d0919f395a4bbfa5a339f6f?d=identicon&s=25 Alexander Jakopin (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 08:29
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, 2005-12-20 at 09:26 +0900, Wilson Bilkovich wrote:
> > ( No I guess not !)
>  -#{This is a comment, not a variable}
>
> So, in recent days, I've switched over to Vim, in the form of:
> http://cream.sourceforge.net
> I'm still getting used to it, and getting over the lack of tabs for my
> open files, but so far the "Ruby compatibility" is much higher.  It
> handles the highlighting for the above snippet of Ruby without any
> difficulty.
>

I'm also a Vim user, but without cream. But Vim isn't my only editor. I
also have used Jed and Emacs (yes, i have used Vim AND Emacs :p) in the
past.

I've found an interesting gui editor with the name "edit". Looks alot
like Textmate(I haven't used Textmate, just to clarify):
http://www.jessies.org/~enh/software/edit/
E34b5cae57e0dd170114dba444e37852?d=identicon&s=25 Logan Capaldo (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 10:41
(Received via mailing list)
On Dec 20, 2005, at 2:27 AM, Alexander Jakopin wrote:

> I've found an interesting gui editor with the name "edit". Looks alot
> like Textmate(I haven't used Textmate, just to clarify):
> http://www.jessies.org/~enh/software/edit/

Looks quite cool, sadly when I try to download the salma-hayek.tgz I
get a 403 Forbidden error.
083c7b239d0919f395a4bbfa5a339f6f?d=identicon&s=25 Alexander Jakopin (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 14:00
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, 2005-12-20 at 18:41 +0900, Logan Capaldo wrote:
> On Dec 20, 2005, at 2:27 AM, Alexander Jakopin wrote:
>
> > I've found an interesting gui editor with the name "edit". Looks alot
> > like Textmate(I haven't used Textmate, just to clarify):
> > http://www.jessies.org/~enh/software/edit/
>
> Looks quite cool, sadly when I try to download the salma-hayek.tgz I
> get a 403 Forbidden error.
I've just mirrored the files:
http://powerhuhn.net/mirror/various/salma-hayek.tgz
http://powerhuhn.net/mirror/various/edit.tgz
E34b5cae57e0dd170114dba444e37852?d=identicon&s=25 Logan Capaldo (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 16:30
(Received via mailing list)
On Dec 20, 2005, at 7:58 AM, Alexander Jakopin wrote:

> I've just mirrored the files:
> http://powerhuhn.net/mirror/various/salma-hayek.tgz
> http://powerhuhn.net/mirror/various/edit.tgz
>

hey, thanks!
25e11a00a89683f7e01e425a1a6e305c?d=identicon&s=25 Wilson Bilkovich (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 18:55
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/20/05, Alexander Jakopin <setrodox@users.sourceforge.net> wrote:
> I've found an interesting gui editor with the name "edit". Looks alot
> like Textmate(I haven't used Textmate, just to clarify):
> http://www.jessies.org/~enh/software/edit/
>
This looks really interesting, but the install process is truly
insane. Has anyone managed to make this work on Win32?  Just checking
to make sure I'm not reinventing the wheel, before I go through the
5-hour process.

--Wilson.
3cb4fdcf13aad6a7dcae83876b0e784e?d=identicon&s=25 Josef 'Jupp' SCHUGT (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 20:05
(Received via mailing list)
Hi!

At Tue, 20 Dec 2005 05:20:40 +0900, Chad Perrin wrote:
> I always just kinda figured that Linux *is* my IDE.

To quote Sting's famous song "Russians": I don's subscribe to this
point of view.

Please recall that IDE means 'integrated development environment'.
Many attributes apply to Unix as an environment but 'integrated'
definitely is not among them.

Let me illustrate this with an example that sometimes make me hack my
keyboard instead of hacking *on* it:

For searching forward for some string you may need to use Ctrl-F,
Ctrl-S or '/' depending on which program you are currently using
(shell, editor, debugger). Integration on the other hand would require
that the same operation is always bound to the same keystroke.

The Emacs operating system and the vim editor are much closer to an
IDE than Unix.

To give an example: In Emacs in order to open a file in the editor you
use 'find-file' and provide a file name. In order to open a directory
in dired-mode you use the same 'find-file' command.

Some vim users may be surprised but vim actually has a similar
feature. If you enter "vim ." vim will list all files in the current
directory, will allow to change to subdirectories, and opens a file if
you select one - a true vi does not have this feature.

I used to do almost anything with vim but now I uses escape, meta,
alt, Ctrl, Shift (Emacs for short) most of the time. To put it this
way: Emacs is a mega swiss army knife. It is not very handy but it is
one single tool that can be used for anything - it even can cook
coffee(*).

Josef 'Jupp' Schugt

(*) Well, sort of. I personally use a manually operated coffee mill, a
    water cooker and a Brazilian style coffee machine to cook my
    coffee - this method is not yet supported by Emacs. It requires an
    RFC-compliant coffee machine (such an RFC exists indeed ;-).
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 20:26
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, Dec 21, 2005 at 04:03:13AM +0900, Josef 'Jupp' SCHUGT wrote:
> definitely is not among them.
>
> Let me illustrate this with an example that sometimes make me hack my
> keyboard instead of hacking *on* it:
>
> For searching forward for some string you may need to use Ctrl-F,
> Ctrl-S or '/' depending on which program you are currently using
> (shell, editor, debugger). Integration on the other hand would require
> that the same operation is always bound to the same keystroke.

Since I'm pretty well dedicated to vim as my primary editor, the same
operation *is* always bound to the same keystroke.  Choosing the
specific tools you use in the Linux IDE is roughly equivalent to
personalizing the settings for a highly configurable IDE product like
Eclipse or Visual Studio.  Well -- maybe not equivalent, but analogous,
at any rate.


>
> The Emacs operating system and the vim editor are much closer to an
> IDE than Unix.

Combine directory browsing and shell access from within the editor,
and/or additional terminal emulator windows open for more direct shell
access, and you've got all the IDE you need.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
31e038e4e9330f6c75ccfd1fca8010ee?d=identicon&s=25 Gregory Brown (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 20:32
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/20/05, Chad Perrin <perrin@apotheon.com> wrote:

> Since I'm pretty well dedicated to vim as my primary editor, the same
> operation *is* always bound to the same keystroke.  Choosing the
> specific tools you use in the Linux IDE is roughly equivalent to
> personalizing the settings for a highly configurable IDE product like
> Eclipse or Visual Studio.  Well -- maybe not equivalent, but analogous,
> at any rate.

Am i the only one that thinks Linux and IDE should not be in the same
sentance?
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 20:59
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, Dec 21, 2005 at 04:31:33AM +0900, Gregory Brown wrote:
> On 12/20/05, Chad Perrin <perrin@apotheon.com> wrote:
>
> > Since I'm pretty well dedicated to vim as my primary editor, the same
> > operation *is* always bound to the same keystroke.  Choosing the
> > specific tools you use in the Linux IDE is roughly equivalent to
> > personalizing the settings for a highly configurable IDE product like
> > Eclipse or Visual Studio.  Well -- maybe not equivalent, but analogous,
> > at any rate.
>
> Am i the only one that thinks Linux and IDE should not be in the same sentance?

I guess that depends on how you mean that.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
083c7b239d0919f395a4bbfa5a339f6f?d=identicon&s=25 Alexander Jakopin (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, 2005-12-21 at 02:53 +0900, Wilson Bilkovich wrote:
> > > >
>
I don't have windows. But on linux it was done in 1 minute.
cd salma-hayek
make
cd ../edit
make

Do you have ruby and java installed? You need both for edit AFAIK.
31e038e4e9330f6c75ccfd1fca8010ee?d=identicon&s=25 Gregory Brown (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 22:15
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/20/05, Chad Perrin <perrin@apotheon.com> wrote:

> > Am i the only one that thinks Linux and IDE should not be in the same sentance?
>
> I guess that depends on how you mean that.

The power of GNU/Linux lies in the very fact that it is NOT an IDE.
You are taking it to mean development environment, and it certainly is
a fine one.

But the thing that makes GNU/Linux differ from any sort of IDE is that
it does not enforce a particular toolset over another one.  With some
effort, you can have an effectively standardized platform on linux,
but in general, it's a ton of tools duct taped together in the way the
individual developer enjoys most.

Calling it an IDE is an over abstraction... and is just plain wrong,
both in the sense of the word, and in the philisophical sense.
However, calling it a fine development platform that precludes the
need for an IDE, while controversial and debatable, would be something
I'd agree on.
25e11a00a89683f7e01e425a1a6e305c?d=identicon&s=25 Wilson Bilkovich (Guest)
on 2005-12-20 22:30
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/20/05, Alexander Jakopin <setrodox@users.sourceforge.net> wrote:
> > > > > are using TextMate ( on MAC OS ?)  It seems pretty effective.
> > --Wilson.
> >
> I don't have windows. But on linux it was done in 1 minute.
> cd salma-hayek
> make
> cd ../edit
> make
>
> Do you have ruby and java installed? You need both for edit AFAIK.
>
Yeah, it just has some dependencies on things that don't exist on
Windows.  I'll just use Cygwin, and not go against the grain.  Cool
site, by the way.. I like the look of "Terminator" as well.  Great
name for a terminal program.
E2b3bbf241a5daee3ee7696a7d4b2015?d=identicon&s=25 Vrtwo Lastname (d0t1q)
on 2005-12-21 05:08
(Received via mailing list)
31e038e4e9330f6c75ccfd1fca8010ee?d=identicon&s=25 Gregory Brown (Guest)
on 2005-12-21 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/18/05, Chad Perrin <perrin@apotheon.com> wrote:
> On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 04:32:37AM +0900, James Britt wrote:
> >
> > (I'm quite happy using vim, Windows file manager, and a handful of
> > custom Ruby shell scripts and Unix command ports for finding and
> > manipulating stuff from the command line. If there's something else find
>
> Care to share any details?

When I'm on windows the first thing I do is install MSys/MingGW.
This lets me use cmd.exe and avoid the mess that is cygwin.   MSys
gives you 'most' of the necessary unix commands, meaning you could
then hack together scripts using backticks or even platform
independant scripts with Ruby and that should do the trick.

I too use vim on OS X, FreeBSD, a slew of linux distros and windows.
Nice to be able to have the same editor act (mostly) the same way on
so many systems...
47b1910084592eb77a032bc7d8d1a84e?d=identicon&s=25 Joel VanderWerf (Guest)
on 2005-12-21 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
Gregory Brown wrote:
>
> When I'm on windows the first thing I do is install MSys/MingGW.
> This lets me use cmd.exe and avoid the mess that is cygwin.   MSys
> gives you 'most' of the necessary unix commands, meaning you could
> then hack together scripts using backticks or even platform
> independant scripts with Ruby and that should do the trick.
>
> I too use vim on OS X, FreeBSD, a slew of linux distros and windows.
> Nice to be able to have the same editor act (mostly) the same way on
> so many systems...
>

There are also the gnu-win32 tools, which give you the usual
ls/grep/diff/yadayada as ordinary windows command line programs, and you
don't need the MSYS baggage:

http://gnuwin32.sourceforge.net/

(Though if you want the gcc build chain or you need a BASH-like
environment for other reasons, MSYS/MinGW is the way to go.)
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-21 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 07:22:50AM +0900, Gregory Brown wrote:
> This lets me use cmd.exe and avoid the mess that is cygwin.   MSys
> gives you 'most' of the necessary unix commands, meaning you could
> then hack together scripts using backticks or even platform
> independant scripts with Ruby and that should do the trick.
>

I guess I should have been more precise in my question:

I was wondering what sort of scripts, et cetera, you use to round out
your development kit.  I'm primarily a Linux user that makes heavy use
of vim and shell file browsing commands (ls and its friends) for
development.  I'm looking for ideas for how to fine-tune my patchwork
development environment further.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
Bc6d88907ce09158581fbb9b469a35a3?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2005-12-21 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
Chad Perrin wrote:
> On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 04:32:37AM +0900, James Britt wrote:
>
>>(I'm quite happy using vim, Windows file manager, and a handful of
>>custom Ruby shell scripts and Unix command ports for finding and
>>manipulating stuff from the command line. If there's something else find
>
>
> Care to share any details?

I have a few vim macros/mappings that insert text for common situations,
such as creating the 'initialize' method, or inserting the skeletal code
for in-file unit testing.  Plus the things that come with the ruby-vim
menus and macro plugin (auto completion of certain Ruby control-flow
expression, quote, bracket, and paren closing; running the current
buffer by pressing f5; calling up ri for text under the cursor, and so
on).

I have some command-line scripts to do very simple things.  Most handy
is a grep-like thing that will find files based on some given file name
pattern; it searches from the current directory, and emits a numbered
list of matches. Type a number and the corresponding file opens in vim.
  I can also run it with a second parameter to name the application that
should open the selected matching file (handy for finding and playing
mp3s).

There's some port of unix tools I've installed (not cygwin, something
else) so I can run grep, ls, a few others.

I try to keep my files small, tend to embed unit tests in the same file
as each class, and don't have a strong need for an uber-IDE.  Ruby makes
it easy enough to assemble little helper tools if I get tired of
repeating commands.

I often switch from Windows to Linux, and don't always have the option
of running a GUI shell, so sticking to vi makes life simpler (and the
same can be said of emacs and other Unix-based editors).

I keep multiple cmd.exe windows open (here's a tip: use the 'title'
command to name your Windows.); each of my project has a Ruby script
that opens up various cmd shells, each distinctly titled and  colored so
I can more easily tell them apart.  I've Ruby tools for bouncing
servers, launching browsers, updating remote servers, deploying
applications, running tests.  (These should perhaps be Rake tasks, and
some of them have been ported, but that's not a habit I've acquired.)

Overall, I'm more of a fan of lots of little tools that play together
than The One True Tool.


James Britt

--

http://www.ruby-doc.org       - Ruby Help & Documentation
http://www.artima.com/rubycs/ - Ruby Code & Style: Writers wanted
http://www.rubystuff.com      - The Ruby Store for Ruby Stuff
http://www.jamesbritt.com     - Playing with Better Toys
http://www.30secondrule.com   - Building Better Tools
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-21 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 08:48:54AM +0900, James Britt wrote:
>
> Overall, I'm more of a fan of lots of little tools that play together
> than The One True Tool.

As am I.  Thanks for the run-down: that was much the sort of information
I was looking for.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
31e038e4e9330f6c75ccfd1fca8010ee?d=identicon&s=25 Gregory Brown (Guest)
on 2005-12-21 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/18/05, Chad Perrin <perrin@apotheon.com> wrote:
\
> I was wondering what sort of scripts, et cetera, you use to round out
> your development kit.  I'm primarily a Linux user that makes heavy use
> of vim and shell file browsing commands (ls and its friends) for
> development.  I'm looking for ideas for how to fine-tune my patchwork
> development environment further.

How much more do you need?  Maybe you should be asking about featurs
you'd like or issues you've run into  and we can offer our
suggestions.   Vim, standard unix commands, some rakefiles to automate
building gems, generating and uploading documentation, packaging my
code, running tests, etc do most of what I need for Ruby.  For
non-ruby development such as C, I use things like splint and foo(1),
the latter being this weird little thing I wrote (a ruby util) that I
doubt would be super useful to anyone.

I make heavy use of ! in vim and just use the shell directly a lot of
the time no matter what kind of development I am doing.  Most of what
I need is right in vim itself with a little helpful support from
vim-ruby.  Heck, vim even handles generating html versions of your
source for you! :)

(1) Foo [ use at your own risk]
http://www.stonecode.org/blog/?p=30
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-21 21:55
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Dec 19, 2005 at 11:43:57AM +0900, Gregory Brown wrote:
> suggestions.   Vim, standard unix commands, some rakefiles to automate
> building gems, generating and uploading documentation, packaging my
> code, running tests, etc do most of what I need for Ruby.  For
> non-ruby development such as C, I use things like splint and foo(1),
> the latter being this weird little thing I wrote (a ruby util) that I
> doubt would be super useful to anyone.

I don't really have specific needs I want addressed.  To quote myself:
"I'm looking for ideas".  That's all.  A mention of using vim with some
automation scripts sparked my curiosity, as 'twere.  It's the stuff I
haven't yet thought of that I'm hoping to get out of this.

>
> (1) Foo [ use at your own risk]
> http://www.stonecode.org/blog/?p=30

I'll have a look at that.  Thanks for the link.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-22 06:15
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, Dec 21, 2005 at 06:13:13AM +0900, Gregory Brown wrote:
>
> The power of GNU/Linux lies in the very fact that it is NOT an IDE.
> You are taking it to mean development environment, and it certainly is
> a fine one.

That depends on what you mean by "integrated".  I mean "integrated" in
that, once I get it all set up, it works together beautifully.  You seem
to mean "integrated" as in "someone else integrated what they like, and
now I have to live with it".

>
> Calling it an IDE is an over abstraction... and is just plain wrong,
> both in the sense of the word, and in the philisophical sense.
> However, calling it a fine development platform that precludes the
> need for an IDE, while controversial and debatable, would be something
> I'd agree on.

Tomayto, tomahto.  Either way, I rather like it.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
31e038e4e9330f6c75ccfd1fca8010ee?d=identicon&s=25 Gregory Brown (Guest)
on 2005-12-22 08:10
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/22/05, Chad Perrin <perrin@apotheon.com> wrote:

> That depends on what you mean by "integrated".  I mean "integrated" in
> that, once I get it all set up, it works together beautifully.  You seem
> to mean "integrated" as in "someone else integrated what they like, and
> now I have to live with it".

My only point is that it does not make sense in the terms of what the
OP was looking for to suggest GNU/Linux as an option and claim it's an
IDE.  It's not.

I am a loyal *nix user, but it begins to get annoying when people
evangelize the platform for the wrong reasons to the wrong target
audience.

I doubt anyone would describe any operating system, much less one as
fragmented as GNU/Linux, as being an IDE.  The meaning of the word is
rather clear (to most people).

I guess what I'm saying is, rather than making some random comment
about how GNU/ Linux IS your IDE, you might have explained why
GNU/Linux might preclude the need for an IDE in the first place.

That would be more helpful.  I am seeing more and more threads with
people begging us not to flame on about our particular choices for
various things.  I also see a lot of 'community x is very opinionated
about technology or concept y'

To me, that type of logic fits ideally in some places, not so much in
others.  If someone is looking for VisualStudio for Ruby, don't offer
them shell scripts and vim.   And if you do, make a good (and
understandable) case for them.  The goal is to help people here,
right?

Sorry for ranting on... I just think things like this make the
difference when it comes to helping people.   Either answer the
question as best as you can or explain why there is a better question
they can be asking.

KDevelop is an IDE as someone pointed out.   GNU/Linux is not.   Under
your assumption, one could percieve that notepad running on windows,
an FTP server to a *nix box somewhere on the internet, a web browser,
and a toaster with little jet engines on it running via some RPC
somehow constitutes an Integrated Development Environment.

Do I feel like my environment works nicely with everything else on my
Gentoo box?   Absolutely.
But be careful using technical words to describe your own (rather
peculiar) abstract concept regarding a specific software
categorization.

And finally, a little bit of real content in the midst of a rant:

From wikipedia:
"Today, the term "IDE" is a contrast to unrelated command-line tools,
such as vi, emacs, or make. While one could think of Unix as an IDE,
most developers think of an IDE as being (or having the appearance of)
a single program in which all development is done."

(http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Integrated_developmen...)

I get what you're saying, I just think it's a little off the mark and
misleading to people who might not clearly understand the subtle
difference between an integrated environment and a tool oriented
system.

Anyway, that's enough rambling on.   As long as you're coding happily
in whatever environment that works for you, I suppose the name doesn't
matter terribly.   I've just always been one for semantics.

-Greg
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2005-12-22 20:26
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, Dec 22, 2005 at 04:07:24PM +0900, Gregory Brown wrote:
>
> Sorry for ranting on... I just think things like this make the
> difference when it comes to helping people.   Either answer the
> question as best as you can or explain why there is a better question
> they can be asking.

Here's the problem:

I made an off-hand comment.  You told me how I was wrong, at great
length.  I explained, briefly, how what I said was perfectly consistent
from my perspective.  You held forth at greater length about how I'm a
bad boy and, additionally, wrong.

Take a chill pill.  Mountains out of molehills, m'friend.

Oh, and one more time, in case you didn't get my previous point:
Tomayto, tomahto.  To make the point more clear:
Tomato, tomato.

Same thing, different perspectives.

Aside from that, I don't much care if you have any more criticism to
offer me and my clearly Wrong opinions.


> Anyway, that's enough rambling on.   As long as you're coding happily
> in whatever environment that works for you, I suppose the name doesn't
> matter terribly.   I've just always been one for semantics.

So have I.  You looked for a way to prove me "wrong", though, and I just
looked at the words "integrated", "design", and "environment", and saw
that I already had all I needed to satisfy all three requirements.

--
Chad Perrin [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
5730f209b34b8474639e0c2020f54513?d=identicon&s=25 Dan Kohn (Guest)
on 2005-12-22 21:23
(Received via mailing list)
Based on this thread, I downloaded RadRails last night.  After several
hours, I am extremely impressed.  It has good folder and file views.
It has superb CVS and SVN integration (it was trivial to setup cvs over
ssh to my pair.com webhosting account).  Unlike Scite, there's coloring
for .rhtml files.  It even has a SQL viewer, although not nearly as
powerful as MySQL-Front.  It also does a decent job on an interface for
the generators and Webrick.  If you use Windows, I recommend that you
give it a try.
28609df65b804cbbb4b81492e360412f?d=identicon&s=25 Chintan Trivedi (Guest)
on 2005-12-23 07:11
(Received via mailing list)
Well I use jedit on windows and found it very handy. Its slight pain to
install the ruby plugin in it as its dependent on other a few plugins
but
once its done, this thing really rocks.
25e11a00a89683f7e01e425a1a6e305c?d=identicon&s=25 Wilson Bilkovich (Guest)
on 2005-12-23 15:16
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/23/05, Chintan Trivedi <chesschintan@gmail.com> wrote:
> Well I use jedit on windows and found it very handy. Its slight pain to
> install the ruby plugin in it as its dependent on other a few plugins but
> once its done, this thing really rocks.
>

How many of these editors will properly highlight:
%Q!
 blah blah "" #{somevalue}
' /' \s'/
!#{actually a comment}

Vim is the only one I've found that runs on Windows that will do it. I
couldn't make Emacs handle it, and the RDT tools for Eclipse failed
completely.
This is my expectation:
http://supremetyrant.com/ruby/syntax_torture.png

..where the editor:
1. Correctly gives the opening and closing portions of the string (%Q!
and !) the same color.
2. Colors the body of the string with the usual 'String' color scheme.
3. Colors interpolated values (#{somevalue} and \s) differently.
4. Realizes that #{actually a comment} is a comment, not something to
interpolate.

I'm imagining that TextMate handles this, from what I've seen.. does
anything else, other than Vim?

Thanks,
--Wilson.
2c51fec8183a5d21c4e11b430beabb47?d=identicon&s=25 Patrick Hurley (Guest)
on 2005-12-23 17:59
(Received via mailing list)
On 12/23/05, Wilson Bilkovich <wilsonb@gmail.com> wrote:
> !#{actually a comment}
> 2. Colors the body of the string with the usual 'String' color scheme.
>
Arachno handles it correctly
Ef8b68858adef176d6dc71a727867b38?d=identicon&s=25 unknown (Guest)
on 2005-12-27 09:55
(Received via mailing list)
> I am looking for a decent Ruby and RAILs editor. (JEdit
> is not really working out for me on Windows)

The Zeus for Windows IDE has support for Ruby:

   http://www.zeusedit.com/features.html
   Note: Zeus is shareware (45 day trial)

It does code folding, class browsing and syntax highlighting
for the Ruby language.

Jussi Jumppanen
Author: Zeus for Windows
F29c276b470890a36bcf54faed15c9d7?d=identicon&s=25 Jules (Guest)
on 2005-12-28 17:50
(Received via mailing list)
Wayne

Many Thanks, ArachnoRuby looks to be just the sort of IDE I was hoping
for to help me with Ruby development

At $29 seems a good proice to pay, with 24 months free updates, even if
Version 1.0 is still April 2006.

Jules
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