Forum: Inkscape Make document square; keep contents centered

3295999fe203c50ac2dfd286217163e1?d=identicon&s=25 Ian Pilcher (Guest)
on 2013-11-13 20:06
(Received via mailing list)
I feel like I must be missing something *really* obvious, but I can't
figure out how to do this.  I have a rectangular document that I need to
make square, while keeping the contents centered.  I.e., I need to add
equal amounts to the left and right side of the document.

How can I do this?  I've tried simply entering the desired margin sizes
in the Document Properties dialog, but it has no effect.  Changing the
width of the document to match the height extends the document to the
right, but it leaves the contents in their current position, which is
now shifted to the left.

Thanks!

--
========================================================================
Ian Pilcher                                         arequipeno@gmail.com
           Sent from the cloud -- where it's already tomorrow
========================================================================
C53fc1a55a7e1d09adda245cf20e9ff0?d=identicon&s=25 Terry Brown (Guest)
on 2013-11-13 20:10
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, 13 Nov 2013 13:02:53 -0600
Ian Pilcher <arequipeno@gmail.com> wrote:

> I feel like I must be missing something *really* obvious, but I can't
> figure out how to do this.  I have a rectangular document that I need to
> make square, while keeping the contents centered.  I.e., I need to add
> equal amounts to the left and right side of the document.

Make the page whatever size you want, select all, and center relative
to page?

http://tavmjong.free.fr/INKSCAPE/MANUAL/html/Align.html

Change Relative to: to Page and click 'treat selection as group'.

Cheers -Terry
57caf4231f0a1fb65e5ff67aba784542?d=identicon&s=25 Chris Tooley (Guest)
on 2013-11-13 20:30
(Received via mailing list)
I would group all your items temporarily (to make sure they stay
positioned
relative to each other), then modify the document settings to be square,
then center the grouped items on the square page vertically and
horizontally.
56ec01a5220915dd463db71ba225796a?d=identicon&s=25 Jurgen Gaeremyn (Guest)
on 2013-11-13 23:30
(Received via mailing list)
Actually, I don't really like this suggestion as it only works if all
your content is on one layer.

If you have multiple layers in a project, you get in lots of trouble if
you follow this path.

Grtz,
Jurgen.
57caf4231f0a1fb65e5ff67aba784542?d=identicon&s=25 Chris Tooley (Guest)
on 2013-11-14 00:30
(Received via mailing list)
I don't work with layers so I wouldn't know, I will take your word for
it :)

Offtopic: is there a reason to work with layers? Is there a memory
savings
on that? grouping has always been sufficient for me...
Chris

On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 2:29 PM, Jurgen Gaeremyn
<jurgen.gaeremyn@pandora.be
Aefd46e73e6b7449c5ce1ce0156797d2?d=identicon&s=25 su_v (Guest)
on 2013-11-14 11:12
(Received via mailing list)
On 2013-11-13 20:02 +0100, Ian Pilcher wrote:
> I feel like I must be missing something *really* obvious, but I can't
> figure out how to do this.  I have a rectangular document that I need to
> make square, while keeping the contents centered.  I.e., I need to add
> equal amounts to the left and right side of the document.
>
> How can I do this?  I've tried simply entering the desired margin sizes
> in the Document Properties dialog, but it has no effect.  Changing the
> width of the document to match the height extends the document to the
> right, but it leaves the contents in their current position, which is
> now shifted to the left.

1) Add a temporary new layer on top
2) in the new layer, draw a filled rectangle, snapping its
   corners to the page corners
3) remove any stroke from the rectangle
4) duplicate the rect and rotate the duplicate by 90°
5) select both rects on the temporary layer
6) Document Properties > Resize page to selection
7) delete temporary layer


hth, V
C8c7c0354ccd194fe57e45c8720b78a1?d=identicon&s=25 Mark Crutch (Guest)
on 2013-11-14 12:07
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 7:29 PM, Chris Tooley <euxneks@gmail.com> wrote:

> I would group all your items temporarily (to make sure they stay
> positioned relative to each other), then modify the document settings to be
> square, then center the grouped items on the square page vertically and
> horizontally.
>

The Align and Distribute dialog has a "Treat selection as group"
checkbox
which will keep the objects' relative positions without having to
manually
group them.



On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 10:29 PM, Jurgen Gaeremyn <
jurgen.gaeremyn@pandora.be> wrote:

> Actually, I don't really like this suggestion as it only works if all
> your content is on one layer.
>

Edit > Select All in All Layers, plus the use of the checkbox in the
dialog, usually does the trick for me.



 On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 11:29 PM, Chris Tooley <euxneks@gmail.com>
wrote:

>
> Offtopic: is there a reason to work with layers? Is there a memory savings
> on that? grouping has always been sufficient for me...
>

Advantages of layers, for me at least:

1) Easy to show/hide so you can work on part of a complex image without
the
distraction of other parts.

2) Performance. If you've got lots of filtered objects then being able
to
hide some of them speeds things up considerably.

3) Security. Locking a layer means you won't accidentally move its
content
when trying to work with something on top of it.

4) Enforced z-index. Put something in the top layer and it always
remains
on top of the work you do in other layers. And the equivalent for the
bottom layer. No need to shuffle things up and down that should always
be
at the top of bottom.

5) "Semantic separation". In other words, separating bits of content by
their purpose.


In practical terms my comics have at least: Border, Background, Content,
Text and Frame layers. With reference to the list above...

1) It's useful to hide all the content and text when working on the
background. Equally for hiding the text when working on the content.

2) I make extensive use of filters. Being able to hide a filtered
background speeds up the rendering when I'm working on the content, for
example.

3) When zoomed in to work on a character it's easy to accidentally move
the
background without realising (as the selection box is outside the
window).
Locking the background helps with this.

4) My backgrounds are always behind the characters. The text is always
on
top of them. The frame that gives a clean edge to the comics (and
prevents
me having to be too perfect when drawing) always sits on top. Without
putting them in layers I'd be constantly moving the frame to the top -
and
undoubtedly forgetting on occasion.

5) The people who translate the comics (usually) only have to deal with
content in the Text layer. They can lock or hide the others to prevent
any
accidents while entering their translations.


I mix layers and groups as appropriate. Layers separate semantically
different parts of the comics. Groups are used to hold all the bits for
a
single character or prop together - or to gather together multiple
objects
that all need to be clipped.

Mark

--
Co-creator of *The Greys* and *Monsters, Inked* webcomics

Website      http://www.peppertop.com/
Facebook   http://facebook.com/TheGreysComic
Twitter        https://twitter.com/TheGreysComic
3295999fe203c50ac2dfd286217163e1?d=identicon&s=25 Ian Pilcher (Guest)
on 2013-11-14 16:27
(Received via mailing list)
On 11/14/2013 04:37 AM, Mark Crutch wrote:
> Edit > Select All in All Layers, plus the use of the checkbox in the
> dialog, usually does the trick for me.

Worked for me as well (OP here), so thanks all!

--
========================================================================
Ian Pilcher                                         arequipeno@gmail.com
           Sent from the cloud -- where it's already tomorrow
========================================================================
56ec01a5220915dd463db71ba225796a?d=identicon&s=25 Jurgen Gaeremyn (Guest)
on 2013-11-14 22:31
(Received via mailing list)
On 2013-11-14 11:37, Mark Crutch wrote:
> checkbox which will keep the objects' relative positions without
> having to manually group them.
Hey wow... I actually never noticed this checkbox.
Thanks for pointing out this great nugget, it's a new golden tip for me!

>  On Wed, Nov 13, 2013 at 11:29 PM, Chris Tooley <euxneks@gmail.com
> <mailto:euxneks@gmail.com>> wrote:
>
>
>     Offtopic: is there a reason to work with layers? Is there a memory
>     savings on that? grouping has always been sufficient for me...
>
I typically use it for 2 purposes:
- multilingual documents: 1 (or more) layers with imagery - 1 layer for
all language dependent items (could be text, but also f.e. a flag)
- floor plans: I have evacuation routes, extinguisher locations,
technical data, ... in one plan. Depending on the situation, I can
choose what information to show or hide (f.e. for escape plans, the
exact dimensions of a room aren't very relevant).

The advantage of locking items down, as Mark said, is also a big
advantage for me.

Grtz,
Jurgen.
3259f6c1768a342016964ee766e76902?d=identicon&s=25 Luke Al (luke80)
on 2014-02-20 04:03
I guess my needs are not as intense as some others.
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