Forum: Ruby I am looking for a free Ruby ide

Bfcff54193f2a15d50b92345fcde3bf1?d=identicon&s=25 hoboy Hoboy (hoboy)
on 2012-03-03 09:51
I will like to learn ruby
and need some ide suggestions
F5a540b04b1f6430efe51d9f3361ef17?d=identicon&s=25 Jan E. (jacques1)
on 2012-03-03 18:05
Hi,

Personally, I use NetBeans. It does no longer support Ruby officially,
but there is a Ruby plugin maintained by the community.

Jacques
Eb6513063ed2380cb6f561d295d925e9?d=identicon&s=25 b1_ __ (b1_)
on 2012-03-04 05:20
I use SciTE. Pretty simple text editor with colouring of code and F5
hotkey for running your code. I didn't need to be learning a complicated
IDE on top of learning Ruby.

If I recall correctly SciTE is bundled with Ruby.

There's a list of IDE's on the Ruby site here:
http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/documentation/

Quoted from that link:
"Here is a list of popular tools used by Rubyists:

    Linux and cross-platform tools:
        Aptana Studio
        Emacs with Ruby mode and Rsense
        Geany
        gedit
        Vim with vim-ruby plugin and Rsense
        RubyMine
        SciTe
    On Windows:
        Notepad++
        E-TextEditor
        Ruby In Steel
    On Mac OS X:
        TextMate
        TextWrangler"
05f0f26ff3dd71101b8a90845214ba77?d=identicon&s=25 huan z. (huan_z)
on 2012-03-04 05:57
Aptana Studio is good.
0d130f179f85401f248e6ebc2ef8292f?d=identicon&s=25 Eric C. (eric_c)
on 2012-03-06 06:15
I just released an IDE today.  It uses GTK to create GUIs for Ruby.  You
can watch a video of it here:

visualruby.net

It has the added advantage that you can build and publish gems too.

Best wishes,
Eric
Ef9964ca3deee9f1c2b1c961306e3af8?d=identicon&s=25 Fred L. (ffred)
on 2012-03-06 08:16
Hello,
visualruby.net looks nice. thanks Eric...

I'm working on Windows with Editra and a few plugins (code browser,
launcher, file browser,..) and it's great to work with Ruby. (there's
also Mac and Linux versions).
E1e4692b0c0b2fcc1844f11cb43191da?d=identicon&s=25 Martin C. (martin_c)
on 2013-03-04 12:30
Netbeans used to be great for editing Ruby before Oracle bought out Sun
and cut the official support for Ruby in Netbeans.

I have started a petition which I hope we can hand to Oracle to ask them
to reinstate official Ruby support in Netbeans. Please consider adding
your name.

Here is the URL:
http://www.ipetitions.com/petition/re-include-ruby...
090c0080146e51b47076a1ce34a41f51?d=identicon&s=25 Rick Carrick (regnadkcin)
on 2013-08-20 19:50
Is there a way to see how much memory is free for a Windows system
inside a Ruby Script?  Sorry if this is a noob question.
14b5582046b4e7b24ab69b7886a35868?d=identicon&s=25 Joel Pearson (virtuoso)
on 2013-08-20 21:26
Rick Carrick wrote in post #1119196:
> Is there a way to see how much memory is free for a Windows system
> inside a Ruby Script?  Sorry if this is a noob question.

http://zhenghaoju700.blog.163.com/blog/static/1358...

require 'ruby-wmi'
mem = WMI::Win32_PerfRawData_PerfOS_Memory.find(:first)
puts "Available Memory: " + mem.AvailableMBytes + "M"
249c7fd851c5c5ac5a1abdb756472ae1?d=identicon&s=25 Arup Rakshit (my-ruby)
on 2013-08-20 22:52
Joel Pearson wrote in post #1119200:
> Rick Carrick wrote in post #1119196:
>> Is there a way to see how much memory is free for a Windows system
>> inside a Ruby Script?  Sorry if this is a noob question.
>
> http://zhenghaoju700.blog.163.com/blog/static/1358...
>
> require 'ruby-wmi'
> mem = WMI::Win32_PerfRawData_PerfOS_Memory.find(:first)
> puts "Available Memory: " + mem.AvailableMBytes + "M"


Nice link.. Thanks Joel.
Fc7cbe8be8a66084b7d6c28586f8274f?d=identicon&s=25 srinivasreddy.v s. (srinivasreddyv_s)
on 2013-08-29 10:12
Attachment: Untitled.jpg (100 KB)
Attachment: Untitled1.jpg (100 KB)
Hi,

am installed ruby on my system, but while logging time am getting NO
SUCH FILE OR DIRECTORY(LOAD ERROR),please help me to resolve this issue.
E4e17e45f2e8cc967a8695131910f365?d=identicon&s=25 THUFIR H. (thufir_h)
on 2013-08-29 10:21
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 10:12:44 +0200, srinivasreddy.v s. wrote:

> Hi,
>
> am installed ruby on my system, but while logging time am getting NO
> SUCH FILE OR DIRECTORY(LOAD ERROR),please help me to resolve this issue.
>
> Attachments:
> http://www.ruby-forum.com/attachment/8695/Untitled.jpg
> http://www.ruby-forum.com/attachment/8696/Untitled1.jpg

In windows (which I don't use) you do something like:

C:\  dir

this will list directory contents.  is your hello_ruby.rb file there?


also:

C:\ type hello_ruby.rb

this will "print", or type, the contents of your ruby script to the
console.


next, you highlight all the interesting bits.  when it's hightlighted,
it's automagically copied to the clipboard.  Paste that into an e-mail
or
something.  Please don't use screenshots.


Thufir
E4e17e45f2e8cc967a8695131910f365?d=identicon&s=25 THUFIR H. (thufir_h)
on 2013-08-29 10:40
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 08:20:48 +0000, thufir wrote:


> next, you highlight all the interesting bits.  when it's hightlighted,
> it's automagically copied to the clipboard.  Paste that into an e-mail
> or something.  Please don't use screenshots.

Well, that's not quite right.  see:


http://www.computerhope.com/issues/ch000805.htm


anyhow, the point is, please don't use screenshots unless necessary.
Probably the ruby script your after is somewhere else.



good luck,

Thufir
37ee5fa90f5eaeef62553629382497f7?d=identicon&s=25 Leslie Viljoen (leslieviljoen)
on 2013-08-29 12:01
b1_ __ wrote in post #1050011:
>     Linux and cross-platform tools:

I'd like to comment on some of these because most are not fully IDE's.

>         Aptana Studio
Pretty extensive, you could say this is a full IDE. It includes
debugging support.

>         Emacs with Ruby mode and Rsense
Emacs is an ancient and very powerful programmable text editor with
syntax highlighting but not an IDE.

>         Geany
A simple text editor with some perks. It will do syntax highlighting and
has some support for projects.

>         gedit
A simple text editor with syntax highlighting but no more.

>         Vim with vim-ruby plugin and Rsense
Another ancient and very powerful programmable text editor like emacs,
can be made to do just about anything a text editor can do but with
quite a learning curve. Many people swear by Vim because they've learned
to be very efficient at it. You can get VI keybindings in many other
editors so you can do a combination - for example Sublime and RubyMine
can do that.

>         RubyMine
This is a full featured Ruby IDE but it's not free. You can evaluate it
for a month before you have to pay $99. It's got everything you could
want - introspection, highlighting, refactoring support, database
support, efficient navigation. Frequently consumes 1GB of RAM on my
machine :). Very good for Rails work.

>         SciTe
I've not used this much but I think its on the same level as Geany - a
text editor with some project support.

>     On Windows:
>         Notepad++
Pretty good for a text editor, far better than Notepad! Still, not much
more than Geany.

>         E-TextEditor
Never used this.

>         Ruby In Steel
This is a plugin for Visual studio with some intellisense features. I've
not used it much.

>     On Mac OS X:
>         TextMate
>         TextWrangler
I've not used these but I have used Sublime Text which is similar.
Sublime is a powerful text editor that includes a ton of easy to install
plugins (like VIM) - but without the learning curve. It has excellent
navigation features so it's pretty good for Rails work but doesn't
understand Ruby code to the point RubyMine does, so it can't quite
navigate as well.. though it's fuzzy file finder almost makes that a
non-issue.

Sublime is not free but you can manage to keep using it if you ignore
the nag screens. Still, it's also not an IDE since it doesn't have
debugging support or any real understanding of the code.


I know tools can become a fanboy fight, I've tried to be objective and I
hope I can people some time in trying all of these out. Feel free to
correct me or add your 2c. Some of these editors I've not used in some
time so YMMV. My most recent have been Vim, Sublime and RubyMine and I
highly recommend these.
E4e17e45f2e8cc967a8695131910f365?d=identicon&s=25 THUFIR H. (thufir_h)
on 2013-08-29 15:34
(Received via mailing list)
This is what keeps me from really committing energy to Ruby, because
eventually I run into a situation where I want and IDE and there just
isn't one.  Oh well.

I'll take another look at Geany, I recall that it has, or can be made to
work with, the ruby beautifier.


-Thufir
C993c6aaffc6cf7b477a5075099e1d36?d=identicon&s=25 Peter Hickman (Guest)
on 2013-08-29 16:33
(Received via mailing list)
On 29 August 2013 14:33, thufir <hawat.thufir@gmail.com> wrote:

> This is what keeps me from really committing energy to Ruby, because
> eventually I run into a situation where I want and IDE and there just
> isn't one.  Oh well.
>
>
Seems odd to me. One of the great things about Ruby for me was that you
didn't need an IDE. I work just fine with Vi and Textmate. When I was
programming Java an IDE was a must because the language was just so
verbose
(not just the amount of code that was written but also the number of
files
you ended up creating). I wouldn't touch Java without an IDE but I have
never been in a situation where I was stuck in Ruby and thought "if only
I
had a proper IDE".

What sort of situations are causing you problems that you believe that
an
IDE would solve?

As an aside the other programmers here swear by RubyMine :(
E4e17e45f2e8cc967a8695131910f365?d=identicon&s=25 THUFIR H. (thufir_h)
on 2013-08-29 16:57
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 15:32:42 +0100, Peter Hickman wrote:


> What sort of situations are causing you problems that you believe that
> an IDE would solve?


I agree, it's different.  Partly because Java is statically typed.

A few things I like (about netbeans and Java) and wish I could do with
ruby:


API   the Java API is right there, as you type you can see methods and
arguments, etc.  I have a heck of a time looking up things in Ruby, go
to
the web, etc.  Not sure that this could even be possible (?) given the
languages dynamic nature.


rename variable.   very easy in Netbeans (and I'm sure, Eclipse et. al.)
and the changes will cascade correctly.  Versus doing e a c h one by
hand..

beautify   in Netbeans, it's alt-shift-f to format, or beautify, the
code.


Those aren't really "IDE" features per se, unless you count renaming a
class an IDE specific feature.  I'm sure emacs can handle all that in a
jiffy.  A good editor would suffice.

Start the editor wars!  or just suggestions.  I've just downloaded geany
and will get the beautifier gem working with it as a plugin, that's most
of it there.  It's just a bit more awkward, hard to define, than using
Netbeans.  Maybe when they perfect Jruby (never) It'll be exactly what I
want :)


ruby idiot,

Thufir
E4e17e45f2e8cc967a8695131910f365?d=identicon&s=25 THUFIR H. (thufir_h)
on 2013-08-29 17:03
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 15:32:42 +0100, Peter Hickman wrote:

> When I was programming Java an IDE was a must because the language was
> just so verbos


Tell me about it.  Java should die so that it can get replaced, instead
it just limps along.  Using ivy to import packages is insane in
comparison to using gems and require -- that alone makes ruby very
attractive.


-Thufir
C993c6aaffc6cf7b477a5075099e1d36?d=identicon&s=25 Peter Hickman (Guest)
on 2013-08-29 17:39
(Received via mailing list)
On 29 August 2013 15:56, thufir <hawat.thufir@gmail.com> wrote:

> languages dynamic nature.
>


RubyMine does this. It is not a problem for dynamic languages. Smalltalk
had this feature from the get go. The whole 'only possible with
statically
typed languages' thing is complete BS.


rename variable.   very easy in Netbeans (and I'm sure, Eclipse et. al.)
> and the changes will cascade correctly.  Versus doing e a c h one by
> hand..
>

Variables being scoped to a class or method are easily changed in Vi or
Textmate. Method renaming is a little more of an issue. I use grep but
again RubyMine has got that covered too.



>
> beautify   in Netbeans, it's alt-shift-f to format, or beautify, the code.
>
>

Again RubyMine does that, personally I just run it through a script that
someone posted to this list. Which can be done without leaving either Vi
or
TextMate.
E4e17e45f2e8cc967a8695131910f365?d=identicon&s=25 THUFIR H. (thufir_h)
on 2013-08-29 19:00
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, 29 Aug 2013 16:39:18 +0100, Peter Hickman wrote:

>> API   the Java API is right there, as you type you can see methods and
>> arguments, etc.  I have a heck of a time looking up things in Ruby, go
>> to the web, etc.  Not sure that this could even be possible (?) given
>> the languages dynamic nature.
>>
>>
>>
> RubyMine does this. It is not a problem for dynamic languages. Smalltalk
> had this feature from the get go. The whole 'only possible with
> statically typed languages' thing is complete BS.

Ok, I wasn't sure, thanks for clarifying.

Guess I'm just cheap and used to free tools.  I might take RubyMine for
a
spin.


-Thufir
C086dffaf43203aee49eb76074c79140?d=identicon&s=25 Arthur Lyman (alyman)
on 2013-08-30 00:20
(Received via mailing list)
I use NetBeans and it saves me a lot of time and effort.

Bookmarking, automatic indenting, and running diffs to previous versions
of the code are among the many features, I prefer not to do without.

Arthur Lyman
(914) 693-5113
mailto://alyman@yahoo.com


________________________________
 From: Peter Hickman <peterhickman386@googlemail.com>
To: Ruby users <ruby-talk@ruby-lang.org>
Sent: Thursday, August 29, 2013 10:32 AM
Subject: Re: I am looking for a free Ruby ide



On 29 August 2013 14:33, thufir <hawat.thufir@gmail.com> wrote:

This is what keeps me from really committing energy to Ruby, because
>eventually I run into a situation where I want and IDE and there just
>isn't one. Oh well.
>
>

Seems odd to me. One of the great things about Ruby for me was that you
didn't need an IDE. I work just fine with Vi and Textmate. When I was
programming Java an IDE was a must because the language was just so
verbose (not just the amount of code that was written but also the
number of files you ended up creating). I wouldn't touch Java without an
IDE but I have never been in a situation where I was stuck in Ruby and
thought "if only I had a proper IDE".

What sort of situations are causing you problems that you believe that
an IDE would solve?

As an aside the other programmers here swear by RubyMine :(
F555402e879ef6ad937e41bbaedb465b?d=identicon&s=25 Brandon W. (brandon_w)
on 2013-08-30 00:41
(Received via mailing list)
I swear by vim. If you're a Unix guy that's used to headless servers
it's a
dream.

Now, as far as all this nonsense about having to manually do anything...
If
you actually bothered to learn regex, key bindings, and macros you would
realize just how preposterous that statement was.

Very consistently I've run circles around people dependant on an IDE or
gui
editor. I'll just flat out say it: if you require an IDE for Ruby,
you're
doing it wrong and you're giving yourself a horrible handicap.

As an example, I had to change a file and commit it to a repo. The
change
was renaming a variable across the file. It took me 5 seconds to find,
open, replace, and push to git. Try that with the graphical versions,
and
you'll realize that the mouse is a rather cumbersome device.

(*how: ag.vim, fugitive.vim, s)
7223c62b7310e164eb79c740188abbda?d=identicon&s=25 Xavier Noria (fxn)
on 2013-08-30 09:37
(Received via mailing list)
For quick editing I use ST3 or nano. For long focused sessions working
on
one application or library I use RubyMine, it has a lot of builtin
knowledge about Rails out of the box.

I used RubyMine for many years just because of the editor, but not as an
integrated environment. That is, edited in RubyMine and used the console
for everything else (rake, server, git, etc.). But lately I am
leveraging
as much of it as I can.

As far as usage patterns is concerned, for many people Vim or Emacs
(emacs
user for many years over here) are IDEs, only they do not call them
IDEs.
If they can jump to a method definition, they do it. If they can install
a
plugin that manages some refactor, they do it. If they can jump to the
test
file with a keystroke, they do it. Git commands without leaving the
editor.
Etc. But I find that to be a variant of Greenspun's tenth rule.

By the way, IDEs != mouse. You can leave RubyMine with a naked frame
only
with code and manage everything with shortcuts, there are plenty (and
user
definable).
37ee5fa90f5eaeef62553629382497f7?d=identicon&s=25 Leslie Viljoen (leslieviljoen)
on 2013-09-03 21:51
THUFIR H. wrote in post #1119966:
> Guess I'm just cheap and used to free tools.  I might take RubyMine for
> a
> spin.

You can expect people to release source code but you can't expect
everything to be free of charge. RubyMine is an extensive IDE. The
lowest price I can see for Visual Studio is $1800 US.

RubyMine is free for open source development, free for use in a
classroom and if you're a student it only costs $29. If you really need
the creature comforts, consider paying for it.
9a45896e48a382fe5c656b8873e0dfcb?d=identicon&s=25 Stu (Guest)
on 2013-09-04 05:15
(Received via mailing list)
I use ed and occasionally compile ruby simply by using a tiny magnet to
switch bits on my hard drive. When I get tired I yell at people on the
interwebs which forced them to come up with uniq semiotic routines to
provide binary translation with conversational tuning. Upon the
realization
of creating a artificial network of iconic proportions I weaved back
into
using a proprietary artistic redirection device to encode my custom
utilitarian ornaments to provide a sleek post modern design of the
primitive predication of engineering a useful more expensive
manufacturing
device. I know it's a racket but hey on occasion we may get the term
open
confused with crowd and begin to notice how a cult following pay minimum
wages to remove the copy(right|left) and authors names.
3df767279ce7d81db0a5bb30f5136863?d=identicon&s=25 Matthew Kerwin (mattyk)
on 2013-09-04 06:11
Stu wrote in post #1120564:
> I use ed and occasionally compile ruby simply by using a tiny magnet to
> switch bits on my hard drive. When I get tired I yell at people on the
> interwebs which forced them to come up with uniq semiotic routines to
> provide binary translation with conversational tuning.

Oh yeah! Good old C-x M-c M-butterfly...
Aa082c8b00a50928e5860dcd70bf2368?d=identicon&s=25 tamouse m. (tamouse_m)
on 2013-09-04 06:25
(Received via mailing list)
On Sep 3, 2013, at 10:14 PM, Stu <stu@rubyprogrammer.net> wrote:

> I use ed and occasionally compile ruby simply by using a tiny magnet to switch
bits on my hard drive. When I get tired I yell at people on the interwebs which
forced them to come up with uniq semiotic routines to provide binary translation
with conversational tuning. Upon the realization of creating a artificial 
network
of iconic proportions I weaved back into using a proprietary artistic 
redirection
device to encode my custom utilitarian ornaments to provide a sleek post modern
design of the primitive predication of engineering a useful more expensive
manufacturing device. I know it's a racket but hey on occasion we may get the 
term
open confused with crowd and begin to notice how a cult following pay minimum
wages to remove the copy(right|left) and authors names.

Brilliant! +1 stu
9b0e9db26c3ba045cb27965880747512?d=identicon&s=25 Stas Ustimenko (clod)
on 2014-04-01 15:22
I suggest to try Codelobster: http://www.codelobster.com
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