Forum: Ruby what to do, what to do..

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A16652fd5d83c0473bd1e39d9a2117a6?d=identicon&s=25 hawkman.gelooft (Guest)
on 2005-11-28 23:10
(Received via mailing list)
hi everyone!
here's my problem..
Ruby's great (not really a problem) and i've learnt quite a bit,
produced
four fairly small programs and now i want to move on, i want to grow
beyond
console windows, into the real application world..
but i don't know which way to go..
i've considered rails, but i don't really like web development, so i
figured
i might want to learn a gui, but i don't know which to chose, i failed
with
tk, and i'm wondering what you would recommend...
greetings, Dirk.
0276239ca57aee241d4b41379587fa20?d=identicon&s=25 lyle.johnson (Guest)
on 2005-11-28 23:18
(Received via mailing list)
On 11/28/05, Dirk Meijer <hawkman.gelooft@gmail.com> wrote:

> i might want to learn a gui, but i don't know which to chose, i failed with
> tk, and i'm wondering what you would recommend...

In what sense did you "fail with Tk"? It's arguably one of the easiest
GUI toolkits for Ruby to get started with, and I'm not sure that you'd
find the others any easier...
38a8230ed3d5c685558b4f0aad3fc74b?d=identicon&s=25 joevandyk (Guest)
on 2005-11-28 23:18
(Received via mailing list)
On 11/28/05, Dirk Meijer <hawkman.gelooft@gmail.com> wrote:
> hi everyone!
> here's my problem..
> Ruby's great (not really a problem) and i've learnt quite a bit, produced
> four fairly small programs and now i want to move on, i want to grow beyond
> console windows, into the real application world..
> but i don't know which way to go..
> i've considered rails, but i don't really like web development, so i figured
> i might want to learn a gui, but i don't know which to chose, i failed with
> tk, and i'm wondering what you would recommend...
> greetings, Dirk.

text-only programs aren't in in the 'real application world'?
37a3c73ffbf864e4b28f7f2384ee12ce?d=identicon&s=25 Timothy Hunter (tim-hunter)
on 2005-11-28 23:35
(Received via mailing list)
Dirk Meijer wrote:
>
What's wrong with console apps? I've made a good living programming for
22 years and never wrote a web app or a GUI app. Think engineering and
math apps. Think reporting applications. Servers. Programs that convert
data in format A to format B.

Find an itch and write a program to scratch it. 4+ years ago I wanted to
write a web-based photo gallery application as a way to learn Ruby. The
only problem was there was no image manipulation library for Ruby, so I
sat down and started writing RMagick to be an interface between Ruby and
ImageMagick.

Never did write the photo gallery.
0c00d644de3b8bb2f655908c79af25a5?d=identicon&s=25 matt (Guest)
on 2005-11-28 23:47
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, 29 Nov 2005, Dirk Meijer wrote:

> hi everyone!
> here's my problem..
> Ruby's great (not really a problem) and i've learnt quite a bit, produced
> four fairly small programs and now i want to move on, i want to grow beyond
> console windows, into the real application world..
> but i don't know which way to go..
> i've considered rails, but i don't really like web development, so i figured
> i might want to learn a gui, but i don't know which to chose, i failed with
> tk, and i'm wondering what you would recommend...

The Pragmatic Programmers have published a short book on QtRuby.  It's
well worth reading.

-- Matt
Nothing great was ever accomplished without _passion_
Cb48ca5059faf7409a5ab3745a964696?d=identicon&s=25 ara.t.howard (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 01:03
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, 29 Nov 2005, Dirk Meijer wrote:

> hi everyone!
> here's my problem..
> Ruby's great (not really a problem) and i've learnt quite a bit, produced
> four fairly small programs and now i want to move on, i want to grow beyond
> console windows, into the real application world..
> but i don't know which way to go..
> i've considered rails, but i don't really like web development, so i figured
> i might want to learn a gui, but i don't know which to chose, i failed with
> tk, and i'm wondering what you would recommend...
> greetings, Dirk.

remember graphical application don't mean 'real' ;-)

i'm working on a 24x7 satellite ingest/processing/delivery system.  over
the
last year i've built a configurable file system event-driven processing
framework and an instant linux clustering toolset.  in otherwords, solve
a
problem and the tools will either fallout in the process or you'll need
to
write them yourself.  either way you're set.

cheers.

-a
Cb48ca5059faf7409a5ab3745a964696?d=identicon&s=25 ara.t.howard (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 01:16
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, 29 Nov 2005, Timothy Hunter wrote:

>> tk, and i'm wondering what you would recommend...
>> greetings, Dirk.
>>
>
> What's wrong with console apps? I've made a good living programming for 22
> years and never wrote a web app or a GUI app. Think engineering and math
> apps. Think reporting applications. Servers. Programs that convert data in
> format A to format B.

this from the man who wrote rmagick.  i love it ;-)

-a
A16652fd5d83c0473bd1e39d9a2117a6?d=identicon&s=25 hawkman.gelooft (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 08:15
(Received via mailing list)
i'd like people to use the programs i create, the average windows user
will
not like using a console...
anyway, i really like programming, but i'm still in highschool, and i
never
now what to program next.
i just think that gui's would give me more options..
anyway, it looks to me like tk is still the best gui to learn, any
really
good tutorials out there?
(i once found one written especially Ruby, but it asumed you already had
tk
knowledge, so that didn't work...)

greetings, Dirk


2005/11/29, ara.t.howard@noaa.gov <ara.t.howard@noaa.gov>:
6e32b16ec35070a346dd4e08799589e5?d=identicon&s=25 eule (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 09:20
(Received via mailing list)
(In response to news:dwLif.5216$q93.1585027@twister.southeast.rr.com by
Timothy Hunter)

> Never did write the photo gallery.
>

Though others did ;) So all is well that ends well.

k
Cfdeff3ac35010e4de8f85d954f24f4a?d=identicon&s=25 damphyr (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 14:16
(Received via mailing list)
Dirk Meijer wrote:
> i'd like people to use the programs i create, the average windows
> user will not like using a console...
Well the average windows user will not use Ruby nor as a matter of fact
stray very far from Word, Excel, iTunes and MediaPlayer.
And take note that most people on this list are not windows users, at
least not just windows users.
> anyway, i really like programming, but i'm still in highschool, and i
> never now what to program next.
Don't worry, I finished highschool (and university) a long time ago and
I still don't know what to program next. And I make my living as a
programmer, imagine that.
The only way you're going to program something for fun is when you have
that 'itch' that Timothy said about.
Find something you want to do for yourself (most really popular programs
started as pet projects that somebody *else* discovered and liked).
Scenario: organize your CDs, figure how to do CDDB requests, scan your
MP3s and figure how to change ID3 tags, put it all together, add images
and build a GUI for it. Then make it web based. You'll be the nth
(n-->infinite) programmer who has build a media library but it will be
yours :).
Post it on Rubyforge and let the hounds of critical assesment pound it.
Notice that what I described above does not require that you start with
a GUI. The GUI (the actual presentation of the application, your view)
is a significant part, but not the most significant, nor the first you
have to consider (usability experts will curse me now). Learn how to
build clean interfaces and nicely decoupled components and you'll be
able to change GUIs according to what you fancy most - and you can use
the nice, old, simple command line to test everything without much fuss.
> i just think that gui's would give me more options.. anyway, it looks
> to me like tk is still the best gui to learn, any really good
> tutorials out there? (i once found one written especially Ruby, but
> it asumed you already had tk knowledge, so that didn't work...)
You could also try Fox, which I find very agreeable personally (I don't
like Tk's looks - at all :) ).
Cheers,
V.-
--
http://www.braveworld.net/riva
Cb48ca5059faf7409a5ab3745a964696?d=identicon&s=25 ara.t.howard (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 14:56
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, 29 Nov 2005, Dirk Meijer wrote:

> i'd like people to use the programs i create, the average windows user will
> not like using a console...  anyway, i really like programming, but i'm
> still in highschool, and i never now what to program next.  i just think
> that gui's would give me more options..  anyway, it looks to me like tk is
> still the best gui to learn, any really good tutorials out there?  (i once
> found one written especially Ruby, but it asumed you already had tk
> knowledge, so that didn't work...)
>
> greetings, Dirk

tk is indeed the most easily learned gui for ruby.  if really are intent
on
coding gui apps try something simple and post your questions here - i
would
imagine you'll be up and running after stumbling over a few hurdles.

kind regards.

-a
E4f967492dbd03c526cc9b397e68021d?d=identicon&s=25 nagai (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 15:49
(Received via mailing list)
From: Damphyr <damphyr@freemail.gr>
Subject: Re: what to do, what to do..
Date: Tue, 29 Nov 2005 22:13:07 +0900
Message-ID: <438C53CD.9060801@freemail.gr>
>  (I don't like Tk's looks - at all :) ).

Many people say so. ;-)

However, Tcl/Tk8.5 accepts integrating the tile themed widget set
(not yet integrated).
The Tile extension is an improbed themeing engine for Tk
(see http://tktable.sourceforge.net/tile/).
WIth Tile, you can get native (much closer) look and feel on your OS,
and can change the theme dynamically.
Ruby/Tk already supports the Tile extension
(see ext/tk/lib/tkextlib/tile.rb & ext/tk/lib/tkextlib/tile/).

# If you try it (of course, Tile has to work on your Tcl/Tk
# libraries), please use the latest version of Ruby/Tk because
# of bugs on wrapper libraries.
49620d9f027b1f200d07be0f079f2093?d=identicon&s=25 walsha2000 (Guest)
on 2005-11-29 19:27
(Received via mailing list)
Dirk Meijer wrote:
> i might want to learn a gui, but i don't know which to chose,

Definitely try Ruby-GTK. It's very nice to my way of thinking.

And once you know GTK you can also use it in Python, C#, C++...,
whatever you can think of, on either Windows or Linux (maybe OS-X soon)
so it's a good skill.
38a8230ed3d5c685558b4f0aad3fc74b?d=identicon&s=25 joevandyk (Guest)
on 2005-12-01 19:20
(Received via mailing list)
On 11/29/05, ara.t.howard@noaa.gov <ara.t.howard@noaa.gov> wrote:
> > greetings, Dirk
>
> tk is indeed the most easily learned gui for ruby.  if really are intent on
> coding gui apps try something simple and post your questions here - i would
> imagine you'll be up and running after stumbling over a few hurdles.

Personally, I had a lot easier time learning ruby-gnome2.  The
documentation is a lot better, and I could use the standard gtk2 docs
as well.  I never quite got the hang of Tk.
F0b26d242cc8af969cb83b045d679348?d=identicon&s=25 pfharlock (Guest)
on 2005-12-03 17:04
(Received via mailing list)
Joe Van Dyk wrote:
>>>found one written especially Ruby, but it asumed you already had tk
> documentation is a lot better, and I could use the standard gtk2 docs
> as well.  I never quite got the hang of Tk.
>
>

when I was learning ruby/tk, I used three sources that worked well for
me.  The first was a book called "Ruby Developer's Guide".  It had a
nice chapter on GUI development and covered TK with a little more depth
than in the PickAxe.  This was enough to get me going.  The next source
I used was a ruby/tk reference which can be found on the Ruby
Application Archive which is a translation of the Japanese Ruby/TK
Reference.  This Reference is far from perfect, but it's enough to allow
you to do most things.  The last place I was able to find good
information was from reading the ruby/tk demos.  These can be a bit
tricky to find as the original maintainer seems to have removed them
from his site.  However the windows one click installer comes with this
example code, as well as some extra example code which was really
useful.  In particular the One click installers demo code comes with an
example of how to construct a TK menubar that allows you to use
ALT-<letter> combinations correctly.

here's a link to the rubytk_en ref on the RAA

http://raa.ruby-lang.org/project/rubytk_en/



I hope this information helps.
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