Forum: Ruby double underscore nomenclature in Python

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289cf19aa581c445915c072bf45c5e25?d=identicon&s=25 Todd Benson (Guest)
on 2009-04-14 02:05
(Received via mailing list)
So, I'm stuck re-engineering some dreadful Python library code into
Ruby (and I mean terrible, a mish-mash of different clashing
programming paradigms -- inheritance, delegation, etc. severely
intertwined all over, ugghh), and I came across Python's use of these
double underscore methods (__hook_method__.  I'm a Python virgin; so
sue me.  Never learned Perl, either).

I'm curious as to why Ruby unintentionally keeps these type of things
less obvious.  I've seen many questions on this group concerning #puts
using an object's #to_s to display itself.  Don't get me wrong; it
doesn't bother me at all, but I've run across a few newbies that
struggle with this type of "hidden" guru knowledge (It's surely not
hidden, but not easy to discover either; sort of like a live
Architeuthis).

So, should one ingrain a style into the language (like the BeOS team
very strongly suggested with its C++ coding practice guidelines), or
keep it laid back and just be firm with people about reading the docs?

Todd
134ea397777886d6f0aa992672a50eaa?d=identicon&s=25 Mark Thomas (Guest)
on 2009-04-14 14:30
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 13, 8:04 pm, Todd Benson <caduce...@gmail.com> wrote:
> doesn't bother me at all, but I've run across a few newbies that
> struggle with this type of "hidden" guru knowledge (It's surely not
> hidden, but not easy to discover either; sort of like a live
> Architeuthis).

Python uses __method_name to denote private methods (not enforced,
just a convention). Ruby has keywords 'private' and 'protected'.

Python uses __method_name__ with leading and trailing underscores for
special system functions with pre-defined behavior. Like __init__()
where ruby uses 'initialize'.

Python has certain underscore methods for operator overloading; you
define __add__() to overload '+'. Whereas in Ruby, you simply define
the '+' method.

I'm not sure how this equates to hidden guru knowledge. Ruby makes
more sense to me in these situations.

-- Mark.
E0d864d9677f3c1482a20152b7cac0e2?d=identicon&s=25 Robert Klemme (Guest)
on 2009-04-14 14:43
(Received via mailing list)
2009/4/14 Mark Thomas <mark@thomaszone.com>:
>> using an object's #to_s to display itself.  Don't get me wrong; it
> where ruby uses 'initialize'.
>
> Python has certain underscore methods for operator overloading; you
> define __add__() to overload '+'. Whereas in Ruby, you simply define
> the '+' method.
>
> I'm not sure how this equates to hidden guru knowledge. Ruby makes
> more sense to me in these situations.

+1

Todd had a nice summary statement included in his first posting: "keep
it laid back and just be firm with people about reading the docs". :-)

Kind regards

robert
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