Forum: Ruby Bitwise question

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6371a1d563ecab62a4c2210aeccb6684?d=identicon&s=25 Andrew Barringer (Guest)
on 2009-01-28 22:23
(Received via mailing list)
I'm working on a project that has a bitmap of permissions and I need to
find out if a user has access.



Given permissions bit mask of 0001C0200F02000000000 where each bit
represents a specific permission



And a request for permissions check on bits [37, 12, 48]



What's the best way to find out if user has access to all requested
permissions?
9e2504e0b74e5384af09ce8a660afac4?d=identicon&s=25 Pascal J. Bourguignon (Guest)
on 2009-01-28 22:35
(Received via mailing list)
Andrew Barringer <abarringer@bsecure.com> writes:

> And a request for permissions check on bits [37, 12, 48]
>
>
>
> What's the best way to find out if user has access to all requested
> permissions?


(def check(permissions,bits)
  (bits . inject(true) { | r , b |
                    (r and (0 != (permissions & (1 << b))))
                 })
end)
                                                                                              nil
(check 0xf0,[1,4,5,6]) -> false
(check 0xf0,[4,5,6])   -> true
Ef3aa7f7e577ea8cd620462724ddf73b?d=identicon&s=25 Rob Biedenharn (Guest)
on 2009-01-28 23:10
(Received via mailing list)
On Jan 28, 2009, at 4:32 PM, Pascal J. Bourguignon wrote:

>>
> (def check(permissions,bits)
>  (bits . inject(true) { | r , b |
>                    (r and (0 != (permissions & (1 << b))))
>                 })
> end)
> 
nil
> (check 0xf0,[1,4,5,6]) -> false
> (check 0xf0,[4,5,6])   -> true
>
> --
> __Pascal Bourguignon__

Or a simpler version:

class Integer
   def as_bits
     ary = []
     (self.size*8).times {|i| ary.unshift(i) if self[i].nonzero?}
     ary
   end

   def check_permissions(*bits)
     bits.all? {|bit| self[bit].nonzero? }
   end
end

irb> 0x0001C0200F02000000000.as_bits
=> [68, 67, 66, 57, 47, 46, 45, 44, 37]
irb> 0x0001C0200F02000000000.check_permissions 37, 12, 48
=> false
irb> 0x0001C0200F02000000000.check_permissions 37, 47, 57
=> true

And written in normal Ruby rather than LispRuby ;-)

-Rob

Rob Biedenharn    http://agileconsultingllc.com
Rob@AgileConsultingLLC.com
F53b05cdbdf561cfe141f69b421244f3?d=identicon&s=25 David A. Black (Guest)
on 2009-01-28 23:13
(Received via mailing list)
Hi --

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009, Pascal J. Bourguignon wrote:

>>
>  (bits . inject(true) { | r , b |
>                    (r and (0 != (permissions & (1 << b))))
>                 })
> end)
> 
nil
> (check 0xf0,[1,4,5,6]) -> false
> (check 0xf0,[4,5,6])   -> true

Possibly more efficient since it short-circuits on the first failed
bit:

   def check(permissions,bits)
     bits.all? {|bit| (permissions & 1 << bit).nonzero? }
   end


David

--
David A. Black / Ruby Power and Light, LLC
Ruby/Rails consulting & training: http://www.rubypal.com
Coming in 2009: The Well-Grounded Rubyist (http://manning.com/black2)

http://www.wishsight.com => Independent, social wishlist management!
699c00ad35f2755810b4aa5f423d73e2?d=identicon&s=25 Albert Schlef (alby)
on 2009-01-29 00:37
Pascal J. Bourguignon wrote:
> (def check(permissions,bits)
>   (bits . inject(true) { | r , b |
>                     (r and (0 != (permissions & (1 << b))))
>                  })
> end)


That what happens when one spends his time typing parenthesis instead of
programming, my dear Pascal. I managed to count at least two bugs there.
One, you need to do (1 << (b-1)). Two, if you pass [] as the bits, the
result will be 'true'.
Cf7cd97cdc8ed7d4ae92965b24f0dfad?d=identicon&s=25 Stefan Rusterholz (apeiros)
on 2009-01-29 01:05
Andrew Barringer wrote:
> I'm working on a project that has a bitmap of permissions and I need to
> find out if a user has access.
>
>
>
> Given permissions bit mask of 0001C0200F02000000000 where each bit
> represents a specific permission
>
>
>
> And a request for permissions check on bits [37, 12, 48]
>
>
>
> What's the best way to find out if user has access to all requested
> permissions?

Whatever 'best' is supposed to mean. Here is one way:

requested_bits.all? { |bit| permissions[bit] == 1 }

Regards
Stefan
9e2504e0b74e5384af09ce8a660afac4?d=identicon&s=25 Pascal J. Bourguignon (Guest)
on 2009-01-29 01:35
(Received via mailing list)
Rob Biedenharn <Rob@AgileConsultingLLC.com> writes:

>>                 })
>
>    def check_permissions(*bits)
>      bits.all? {|bit| self[bit].nonzero? }
>    end
> end

Simplier?  A class, two methods, a lot of operations, a lot of memory!
9e2504e0b74e5384af09ce8a660afac4?d=identicon&s=25 Pascal J. Bourguignon (Guest)
on 2009-01-29 01:45
(Received via mailing list)
Albert Schlef <albertschlef@gmail.com> writes:

> One, you need to do (1 << (b-1)).
Bit 0 is the first bit.  2^0 = 1

> Two, if you pass [] as the bits, the
> result will be 'true'.

Which is of course the correct answer.
All the bits in the empty set are in any bitfield.
There is no bit in the empty set hat are not in a given bitfield.
699c00ad35f2755810b4aa5f423d73e2?d=identicon&s=25 Albert Schlef (alby)
on 2009-01-29 03:14
Pascal J. Bourguignon wrote:
> Albert Schlef <albertschlef@gmail.com> writes:
> > One, you need to do (1 << (b-1)).
> Bit 0 is the first bit.  2^0 = 1

I stand corrected.

> > Two, if you pass [] as the bits, the
> > result will be 'true'.
>
> Which is of course the correct answer.
> All the bits in the empty set are in any bitfield.
> There is no bit in the empty set hat are not in a given bitfield.

All right, all right, you win ;-)  I now see that [].all? too returns
'true'.

(So my attempt at dissuading you from using parenthesis failed
miserably. Say, won't you consider dropping them for humanitarian
reasons?)
F53b05cdbdf561cfe141f69b421244f3?d=identicon&s=25 David A. Black (Guest)
on 2009-01-29 03:19
(Received via mailing list)
Hi --

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009, Rob Biedenharn wrote:

>>> Given permissions bit mask of 0001C0200F02000000000 where each bit
>>
>> --
>
> def check_permissions(*bits)
>   bits.all? {|bit| self[bit].nonzero? }
> end
> end

Thanks for the reminder about Integer#[], one of those cool Ruby
things that come back and re-surprise me with their coolness
occasionally :-)


David

--
David A. Black / Ruby Power and Light, LLC
Ruby/Rails consulting & training: http://www.rubypal.com
Coming in 2009: The Well-Grounded Rubyist (http://manning.com/black2)

http://www.wishsight.com => Independent, social wishlist management!
F53b05cdbdf561cfe141f69b421244f3?d=identicon&s=25 David A. Black (Guest)
on 2009-01-29 03:24
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, 29 Jan 2009, Pascal J. Bourguignon wrote:

>>>  (bits . inject(true) { | r , b |
>>      ary
>>    end
>>
>>    def check_permissions(*bits)
>>      bits.all? {|bit| self[bit].nonzero? }
>>    end
>> end
>
> Simplier?  A class, two methods, a lot of operations, a lot of memory!

as_bits is just there to provide information for the sake of
understanding the examples. check_permissions is Rob's answer to the
original question. It looks about as simple as it could be: very
idiomatic, clear, and concise.

If you don't like adding to Integer you can make it functional-style
by adding a second argument.


David

--
David A. Black / Ruby Power and Light, LLC
Ruby/Rails consulting & training: http://www.rubypal.com
Coming in 2009: The Well-Grounded Rubyist (http://manning.com/black2)

http://www.wishsight.com => Independent, social wishlist management!
F53b05cdbdf561cfe141f69b421244f3?d=identicon&s=25 David A. Black (Guest)
on 2009-01-29 03:27
(Received via mailing list)
Hi --

On Thu, 29 Jan 2009, Albert Schlef wrote:

>> Which is of course the correct answer.
>> All the bits in the empty set are in any bitfield.
>> There is no bit in the empty set hat are not in a given bitfield.
>
> All right, all right, you win ;-)  I now see that [].all? too returns
> 'true'.

I could imagine wanting to handle the [] case conservatively. If the
idea is to screen for permissions, and you want the default to be
rejecting the person, then you'd probably want to reject an empty set
of bits. [].all? does indeed always return true, so you'd have to do a
separate empty? test somewhere.


David

--
David A. Black / Ruby Power and Light, LLC
Ruby/Rails consulting & training: http://www.rubypal.com
Coming in 2009: The Well-Grounded Rubyist (http://manning.com/black2)

http://www.wishsight.com => Independent, social wishlist management!
163755a5d3a5c57bd79c4f41bdda7a22?d=identicon&s=25 Clifford Heath (Guest)
on 2009-01-29 05:40
(Received via mailing list)
David A. Black wrote:
> Thanks for the reminder about Integer#[], one of those cool Ruby
> things that come back and re-surprise me with their coolness
> occasionally :-)

Cool indeed... pity it doesn't take a range however:

9547[0..-1]
TypeError: can't convert Range into Integer

oops.
6371a1d563ecab62a4c2210aeccb6684?d=identicon&s=25 Andrew Barringer (Guest)
on 2009-01-29 06:01
(Received via mailing list)
Thanks guys, the answers provided contained what I was looking for. I
had hacked together something that worked but seemed so un-ruby like.
This is nice looking very fast code.

Andy

________________________________

From: Clifford Heath [mailto:no@spam.please.net]
Sent: Wed 1/28/2009 10:37 PM
To: ruby-talk ML
Subject: Re: Bitwise question



David A. Black wrote:
> Thanks for the reminder about Integer#[], one of those cool Ruby
> things that come back and re-surprise me with their coolness
> occasionally :-)

Cool indeed... pity it doesn't take a range however:

9547[0..-1]
TypeError: can't convert Range into Integer

oops.
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