Forum: Inkscape convert .svg or bitmap to .dxf

F9d6c6a4c8c17f23f74e81d24051f7a2?d=identicon&s=25 Elwin Estle (Guest)
on 2007-09-24 15:13
(Received via mailing list)
I know that there is at least one utility that will convert .dxf to
.svg.  However, is
there one that will convert going the other way, from .svg (or a bitmap)
to .dxf?  I am
looking for something open source, if possible.  I have found a couple
of shareware
windows only programs.

The end goal is this:  To be able to scan something, convert it to a
.dxf file which will
then be converted for a Trumpf laser cutter to cut that shape out of
sheet metal.


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Cc1bcf40451d6c18fe3a4e40cf8bdcac?d=identicon&s=25 Nicu Buculei (Guest)
on 2007-09-24 16:44
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Elwin Estle wrote:
> I know that there is at least one utility that will convert .dxf to .svg.  However, is
> there one that will convert going the other way, from .svg (or a bitmap) to .dxf?  I am
> looking for something open source, if possible.  I have found a couple of shareware
> windows only programs.

I think that utility you heard of is pstoedit - http://www.pstoedit.net/
 From what I see from its website, it can generate DXF too. From
conversion from bitmap to a vector format, you may need to trace it
first (with the Inkscape built-in functions or potrace from command
line).


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95dbaa3264461c61e0c9510ce9f363a4?d=identicon&s=25 john cliff (Guest)
on 2007-09-24 19:22
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file > save as....

select dxf as the format.

job done.


On 9/24/07, Elwin Estle <chrysalis_reborn@yahoo.com> wrote:
> Don't let your dream ride pass you by. Make it a reality with Yahoo! Autos.
> Inkscape-user mailing list
> Inkscape-user@lists.sourceforge.net
> https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/inkscape-user
>

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F9d6c6a4c8c17f23f74e81d24051f7a2?d=identicon&s=25 Elwin Estle (Guest)
on 2007-09-26 15:20
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Thanks for all your help, guys.  The saving to .dxf directly from
Inkscape did the trick.

I work in a factory.  We have this fancy, half million dollar machine
that cuts parts
from sheet metal with a laser beam. ( http://www.trumpf.com/ )

Someone had something they wanted to scan and then cut out on the
machine.  I scanned the
image, used Gimp to make it so it was just a black outline on a white
background, then
imported the resulting bitmap into Inkscape and ran trace bitmap on it.
I simplified and
cleaned up the resulting .svg, then saved it as a .dxf, which the Trumpf
software could
convert and use to cut out the shape.

The examples below were done directly in Inkscape (not from scans) and
saved as .dxf.
There is a picture of the resulting cut metal objects in sixteen gage
sheet metal.

http://img219.imageshack.us/img219/9753/piee6.png

http://img255.imageshack.us/img255/5249/biohazarduv3.png

http://img105.imageshack.us/img105/990/metalshapesys1.jpg



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22863a81818132d885fcde6b1ff72078?d=identicon&s=25 Patrick (Guest)
on 2007-10-15 01:24
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Hi Elwin and list

I hope you don't mind me opening up an old thread but this is exactly
what I want to do too. I would like to bring some drawings to a company
to have them laser cut.

The design has one part that must be 3.02 mm.

I am new to Inkscape and just learning the basics. Do you know if there
is a way save dimensional information in the .dxf with Inkscape? Did you
have to do this afterwards?

Any information you can provide would be really appreciated. BTW your
designs in sheet metal look really cool-Patrick
F9d6c6a4c8c17f23f74e81d24051f7a2?d=identicon&s=25 Elwin Estle (Guest)
on 2007-10-15 15:16
(Received via mailing list)
That I couldn't tell you.  I only created the .dxf file and handed it
off to the laser
programmer who converted it to run on the laser.  However, he did say
that the scaling on
the inkscape .dxf files was a bit funky.  I am wondering if you could
put in some sort of
reference object, like a line or circle that is at some specified
dimension and then,
when loading the .dxf into the laser software, just scale the whole .dxf
so that the
scale for the reference is correct, then just delete the reference.  I
don't know if this
approach would be possible or not, since I have no experience with the
actual laser
software, but it might be a start.


--- Patrick <optomatic@rogers.com> wrote:

> have to do this afterwards?
> > from sheet metal with a laser beam. ( http://www.trumpf.com/ )
> >
> >
> > _______________________________________________
> > Inkscape-user mailing list
> > Inkscape-user@lists.sourceforge.net
> > https://lists.sourceforge.net/lists/listinfo/inkscape-user
> >
> >
>
>




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B011a6257ec8ca752f7245d30899addf?d=identicon&s=25 Aaron Spike (Guest)
on 2007-10-15 16:20
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Elwin Estle wrote:
> That I couldn't tell you.  I only created the .dxf file and handed it off to the laser
> programmer who converted it to run on the laser.  However, he did say that the scaling 
on
> the inkscape .dxf files was a bit funky.  I am wondering if you could put in some sort 
of
> reference object, like a line or circle that is at some specified dimension and then,
> when loading the .dxf into the laser software, just scale the whole .dxf so that the
> scale for the reference is correct, then just delete the reference.  I don't know if 
this
> approach would be possible or not, since I have no experience with the actual laser
> software, but it might be a start.

The scaling behavior is certainly "a bit funky" by design. You will
notice that the dxf format has a rather specific label. It was created
for interoperation with robomaster software for desktop cutting plotters
like the wishblade. The scale factor is easy to find in the python
source you can easily change it to fit your needs.

Aaron Spike
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