Forum: Ruby on Rails Bypass "public html" and go straight to a controller, or not

Announcement (2017-05-07): www.ruby-forum.com is now read-only since I unfortunately do not have the time to support and maintain the forum any more. Please see rubyonrails.org/community and ruby-lang.org/en/community for other Rails- und Ruby-related community platforms.
764996e8a8df625a5fea0a7a211bf37e?d=identicon&s=25 Chris Stewart (Guest)
on 2007-06-20 18:58
(Received via mailing list)
I'm wondering what the general consensus is for utilizing Apache for the
static content and only using Mongrel/WEBrick/etc for the Ruby code.
From
the resource perspective, it's a rather obvious choice.  From the
development perspective, it's not so clear.  I personally don't care to
have
Apache on my development machine and enjoy the flexibility of developing
my
projects across multiple computers.  To develop, all I need to do is
checkout my code from Subversion and start a Mongrel instance.  No
Apache
config, etc.  My application is right there, complete, and ready to
roll.
If I had the Apache layer, I'd need to spend time configuring that.

What I generally do is create a "home" or "welcome" controller that
simply
drives pages like about us, contact, directions, etc.  All of the URL
mappings are done in the routes file.

What are your thoughts on this subject?

--
Chris Stewart
compiledmonkey@gmail.com
http://www.compiledmonkey.com
2f9a03aa0fcfe945229cb6126eda2cb2?d=identicon&s=25 Philip Hallstrom (Guest)
on 2007-06-20 19:05
(Received via mailing list)
> What I generally do is create a "home" or "welcome" controller that simply
> drives pages like about us, contact, directions, etc.  All of the URL
> mappings are done in the routes file.
>
> What are your thoughts on this subject?

Why do you need apache for development? Mongrel will serve up static
files
and Rails just fine...

I used to develop "mongrel only" quite a bit.  I don't now, but that's
for
reason completely outside of this...

-philip
This topic is locked and can not be replied to.