Forum: Ruby Question to all you newbies (others welcome)

Announcement (2017-05-07): www.ruby-forum.com is now read-only since I unfortunately do not have the time to support and maintain the forum any more. Please see rubyonrails.org/community and ruby-lang.org/en/community for other Rails- und Ruby-related community platforms.
7b4707f974af261f71943e1f2046c9ee?d=identicon&s=25 SonOfLilit (Guest)
on 2007-04-07 18:05
(Received via mailing list)
Hello everyone,

As you hopefully know, I founded http://RubyMentor.rubyforge.org, a
project that offers volunteer help to Ruby newbies.

My question is where would it be most effective to advertise
RubyMentor? What are the places newbies go to first when deciding to
learn Ruby these days? How can I make sure that every newbie knows
RubyMentor exists, just like they probably know that the Pickaxe I is
free online and that Rails has some very helpful screencasts?

Any feedback appreciated from newbie and veteran alike,


Aur Saraf
500e92cfb666d6757c317a5df7c7e28d?d=identicon&s=25 Shawn Bright (nephish)
on 2007-04-07 18:34
(Received via mailing list)
The first place i looked was google, then signed up for this list and
a couple of help forums. So, i guess, get a good page rank with
google.
i think your idea is a cool one. btw

sk
7b4707f974af261f71943e1f2046c9ee?d=identicon&s=25 SonOfLilit (Guest)
on 2007-04-07 18:48
(Received via mailing list)
Page rank for what keywords?

Page rank means having people link to it...

Anybody with a relevant site willing to help with that?

Aur
F7ffbebbb463308298b1864ad0e9552e?d=identicon&s=25 Simon Rozet (Guest)
on 2007-04-07 18:57
(Received via mailing list)
2007/4/7, SonOfLilit <sonoflilit@gmail.com>:

> As you hopefully know, I founded http://RubyMentor.rubyforge.org, a
> project that offers volunteer help to Ruby newbies.
>
> My question is where would it be most effective to advertise
> RubyMentor?

Your project is really interesting. IMHO that's the better way to
learn something. I think Ruby is the only language with a mentor
concept. So, ruby-lang.org could use it as a marketing argument. imho
ruby-lang.org is the better way to advertise about it.
"Ruby is only programming language with one-to-one mentor helping
people to learn"
That's a poor sentence, but you get an idea :-)
703fbc991fd63e0e1db54dca9ea31b53?d=identicon&s=25 Robert Dober (Guest)
on 2007-04-07 19:14
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/7/07, Simon Rozet <simon.rozet@gmail.com> wrote:
> concept. So, ruby-lang.org could use it as a marketing argument. imho
> ruby-lang.org is the better way to advertise about it.
> "Ruby is only programming language with one-to-one mentor helping
> people to learn"
Hmm are we already there? I was contacted once but it was completely
outisde my expertise, I tried to find an interested mentor but there
was nobody, no big deal, we tried at least;)
But it might be wise to get some feedback before boldly going where no
one has gone before;) e.g. stating thar Ruby has a Mentor Concept,
which seems slightly exaggerated to me, right now, any different
opions about this ?
Cheers
Robert
<snip>
96931bfe0c2948f47a98e15ae52e5637?d=identicon&s=25 Chris Carter (cdcarter)
on 2007-04-07 19:19
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/7/07, Robert Dober <robert.dober@gmail.com> wrote:
> > learn something. I think Ruby is the only language with a mentor
> opions about this ?
> --
> You see things; and you say Why?
> But I dream things that never were; and I say Why not?
> -- George Bernard Shaw
>
>
I agree, we should wait a bit, and see how it works before we start
advertising on ruby-lang.org.  The wiki leads me to believe that it
has only actually happened once.  It would be neat if we could get it
on maybe the mailing list subscribe page, and on ruby-forum, as just a
little hint.  something like Remember: There is a community driven
one-on-one mentor program you can sign up for, try it! It's easy!
C742175a04e90db217deaf3650ef5d30?d=identicon&s=25 Michael Brooks (Guest)
on 2007-04-07 21:01
(Received via mailing list)
SonOfLilit wrote:
>
> Any feedback appreciated from newbie and veteran alike,
>
>
> Aur Saraf
>

Hello Aur:

About 6 weeks ago, when I started looking at Ruby, I went to Google and
typed "ruby programming".  The first hit was the
http://www.ruby-lang.org/ page and I clicking on it.  So, I'd suggest
placing something on that page.

On that page there is a "Get Started, it’s easy!" section on the top
right.  I'd suggest putting a "Get Help", "Get Help from a RubyMentor"
or something like that in that section.

I didn't trip over the other Ruby sites and books like Pickaxe until
many hours or days later because I was busy looking at all the stuff on
the ruby-lang.org page.

Michael
852a62a28f1de229dc861ce903b07a60?d=identicon&s=25 Gavin Kistner (phrogz)
on 2007-04-07 23:06
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 7, 10:04 am, SonOfLilit <sonofli...@gmail.com> wrote:
> My question is where would it be most effective to advertise
> RubyMentor? What are the places newbies go to first when deciding to
> learn Ruby these days? How can I make sure that every newbie knows
> RubyMentor exists, just like they probably know that the Pickaxe I is
> free online and that Rails has some very helpful screencasts?

As so many new users seem to post to the mailing list/discussion group/
newsgroup via http://www.ruby-forum.com/, I would see if you can get
it on there.
084b13bebff6514ac50cd171c4e10e51?d=identicon&s=25 ChrisKaelin (Guest)
on 2007-04-07 23:15
(Received via mailing list)
I totally agree, what people say about a single-entry-point: ruby-
lang.org. We just love, when we have one instance, where we can start
(gentoo had this problem too years ago, and many open-source-projects
also suffer of too many websites).
Remember, we have raa, ruby-doc, ruby-quiz etc.etc. A primary website
like ruby-lang.org should also be used to bundle some of them or at
least link to those pages in an appropriate way... An open wiki for
everything would also be very useful, as we could put some tutorials
for other ruby-related topics in there (tk, sdl, mysql)
Ff9e18f0699bf079f1fc91c8d4506438?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2007-04-07 23:31
(Received via mailing list)
ChrisKaelin wrote:
> An open wiki for
> everything would also be very useful, as we could put some tutorials
> for other ruby-related topics in there (tk, sdl, mysql)

RubyGarden.org has been hosting the Ruby community wiki for, what, 7
years now?


Shame more people don't know to use it.


--
James Britt

"If you don't write it down, it never happened."
  - (Unknown)
8217faf2bfdfa7daf10135d41ddd421e?d=identicon&s=25 Jeff Cohen (jeff)
on 2007-04-07 23:52
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 7, 4:30 pm, James Britt <james.br...@gmail.com> wrote:
> RubyGarden.org has been hosting the Ruby community wiki for, what, 7
> years now?
>
> Shame more people don't know to use it.

Hi James,

Well, actually the rubygarden.org home page's main article is dated
from 2005, which makes it look likes nobody cares about the site
anymore.

The "New Ruby Users Survey", the top link in the right-hand sidebar,
has a different css applied to it and seems to be from 2004.  For
being the top link, these two facts deter users from thinking they've
found a good place for Ruby information.

The second link, "FAQ" probably a popular thing for newbies to click
on, is broken.

The "Ruby Wiki" link, the third link, leads to the wiki and it looks
really promising...  but then the very first Getting Started link
gives me a redirect notice that does not resolve automatically...
again not confidence-inspiring.

Same goes for the next link, the "Ruby Nuby" information.

That's when I stopped trying to use rubygarden.org, and perhaps that's
been the experience for others as well.  I don't think it's because I
"don't know how to use it." :-)

Please don't take this the wrong way... I bet there's a lot of good
information on the wiki, and obviously many people have donated time
and effort to it.  But at least right now, it doesn't seem to be a
good resource for new Ruby users.

Just my two cents.

Jeff
softiesonrails.com
084b13bebff6514ac50cd171c4e10e51?d=identicon&s=25 ChrisKaelin (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 00:40
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 7, 11:51 pm, "Jeff" <cohen.j...@gmail.com> wrote:
> from 2005, which makes it look likes nobody cares about the site
> anymore.
For me too, that's why I did not look at it very long. Sorry for my
ignorance, but I was thinking a bit more of an easy "how-to" style
wiki. "How to include Enumerable into your classes" etc.

I'd really love to contribute my tiny bits of knowledge there.
Ff9e18f0699bf079f1fc91c8d4506438?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 05:10
(Received via mailing list)
Jeff wrote:
> anymore.
Valid point.  Given that there's a new Ruby or Rails
blog/article/forum/aggregator/zine popping up every other day it's not
surprising.  Hard to get new content.


>
> The "New Ruby Users Survey", the top link in the right-hand sidebar,
> has a different css applied to it and seems to be from 2004.  For
> being the top link, these two facts deter users from thinking they've
> found a good place for Ruby information.
>

<lengthy_critique_snipped />


...


> Please don't take this the wrong way...

I won't.  I don't run that site.  If I had time to write up a lengthy
critique, I might consider lending a hand to help those who do run it.

> I bet there's a lot of good
> information on the wiki, and obviously many people have donated time
> and effort to it.  But at least right now, it doesn't seem to be a
> good resource for new Ruby users.

A wiki is what its users make it.

Still, the main page of the wiki

  http://wiki.rubygarden.org/Ruby

has numerous links for getting started, under the first section, Ruby
for the Nuby.

I won't dispute that the site could be improved, both in content and
layout.  But, like most Ruby sites, it's a volunteer community effort.

I get all sorts of comments about ruby-doc.org, most helpful, but some
are just lists of complaints.  To those, my answer is (almost) always,
"Where's the patch?"


--
James Britt

"Blanket statements are over-rated"
8217faf2bfdfa7daf10135d41ddd421e?d=identicon&s=25 Jeff Cohen (jeff)
on 2007-04-08 05:39
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 7, 10:09 pm, James Britt <james.br...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I won't dispute that the site could be improved, both in content and
> layout.  But, like most Ruby sites, it's a volunteer community effort.
>
> I get all sorts of comments about ruby-doc.org, most helpful, but some
> are just lists of complaints.  To those, my answer is (almost) always,
> "Where's the patch?"

I totally agree, and that's why I never said anything before, because
I know I wouldn't have the time to contribute.  It's only the
answering the OP's question that I decided to say something.  I hope
it didn't come off too much like mindless complaining.

Jeff
Ac0085dae0703db56ad7f8cb9e1798ba?d=identicon&s=25 Phillip Gawlowski (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 05:53
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/8/07, Jeff <cohen.jeff@gmail.com> wrote:
> I totally agree, and that's why I never said anything before, because
> I know I wouldn't have the time to contribute.  It's only the
> answering the OP's question that I decided to say something.  I hope
> it didn't come off too much like mindless complaining.

No, not at all. It was critique, and valid critique (similar to what I
experienced when using rubygarden) of the site. And without critique,
the website cannot be made more useful.

I personally will probably provide a code snippet to handle
SQLite3-Ruby's odd handling of result sets (I'm not too good at
getting my head around nested arrays, and I'm probably not the only
one).



And concerning the "Where's the Patch?" - attitude: It is important to
keep in mind, that not everybody is able to work with
HTML/Ruby/CSS/@stuff, but it is possible to voice critique. Of course,
such a critique has to be valid and thought out.


--
Phillip "CynicalRyan" Gawlowski
cynicalryan.110mb.com

"By Zarglewang's thuppy!"
- Illiad
852a62a28f1de229dc861ce903b07a60?d=identicon&s=25 Gavin Kistner (phrogz)
on 2007-04-08 07:05
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 7, 9:09 pm, James Britt <james.br...@gmail.com> wrote:
> I get all sorts of comments about ruby-doc.org, most helpful, but some
> are just lists of complaints.  To those, my answer is (almost) always,
> "Where's the patch?"

Ah, but:
http://phrogz.net/nodes/criticismwithoutasolution.asp

It's hard to take, but (IMO) complaints are still valid and helpful
without patches. In some cases (if the complainer has no coding/
writing/designing skill) they are far *better* without a patch,
because they let you focus on the problem at hand, and not some
particularly foolish fix they propose.
7b4707f974af261f71943e1f2046c9ee?d=identicon&s=25 SonOfLilit (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 07:26
(Received via mailing list)
It IS advertised in ruby-lang. Didn't anybody stumble upon it? Here,
the last entry:

http://www.ruby-lang.org/en/community/

I've asked James to put it in a more central place, but he asked to
first see where the project is going (which is impossible with how
decentralized it is right now).

I couldn't contact the ruby-forum owner. Never got a response. Anybody
can help with that?


Aur
Ff9e18f0699bf079f1fc91c8d4506438?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 07:39
(Received via mailing list)
Jeff wrote:
> answering the OP's question that I decided to say something.  I hope
> it didn't come off too much like mindless complaining.

Probably no more than I came off as mindless ranting.  :)

Bottom line, perhaps people with the time and inclination might consider
contacting the folks running the site and see if there's some way to
help.

(I say that with some reluctance, because, running some Ruby sites
myself, not all offers of help are well-expressed, however well
intentioned. )


--
James Britt

"I can see them saying something like 'OMG Three Wizards Awesome'"
   - billinboston, on reddit.com
Ff9e18f0699bf079f1fc91c8d4506438?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 07:43
(Received via mailing list)
Phillip Gawlowski wrote:

>
>
> And concerning the "Where's the Patch?" - attitude: It is important to
> keep in mind, that not everybody is able to work with
> HTML/Ruby/CSS/@stuff, but it is possible to voice critique. Of course,
> such a critique has to be valid and thought out.


Granted.  But one should keep in mind that, most often, the person on
the receiving end of such critique are short on time, and if someone has
the time and experience to assembled a lengthy list of alleged problems,
then offering some sort of solution for them seems reasonable.

--
James Britt

"I can see them saying something like 'OMG Three Wizards Awesome'"
   - billinboston, on reddit.com
Ff9e18f0699bf079f1fc91c8d4506438?d=identicon&s=25 James Britt (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 07:49
(Received via mailing list)
Phrogz wrote:
> writing/designing skill) they are far *better* without a patch,
> because they let you focus on the problem at hand, and not some
> particularly foolish fix they propose.


When someone tells me I have a misspelling or that something is
rendering poorly in Opera, that's fine.

When I get three pages of "Here's why your site sucks", that's a
different story.

Somewhere in between, people should start considering that time spent
complaining about 10 things could be spent fixing any one of them.


--
James Britt

"I was born not knowing and have had only a little
  time to change that here and there."
  - Richard P. Feynman
Ac0085dae0703db56ad7f8cb9e1798ba?d=identicon&s=25 Phillip Gawlowski (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 09:05
(Received via mailing list)
James Britt wrote:

> Granted.  But one should keep in mind that, most often, the person on
> the receiving end of such critique are short on time, and if someone has
> the time and experience to assembled a lengthy list of alleged problems,
> then offering some sort of solution for them seems reasonable.

Of course. At least ideas, and technical solutions (unless the expertise
isn't there, but that is difficult to check), should be part of a
thought out critique. At least, that is what I understand when using
"thought out".

Unless I can't offer arguments or ideas, I don't criticize, but offer
suggestions.


--
Phillip "CynicalRyan" Gawlowski
http://cynicalryan.110mb.com/

Rule of Open-Source Programming #4:

If you don't work on your project, chances are that no one will.
Df13d29fbc02d6979b4e6d3a3ccb4e4a?d=identicon&s=25 bino_oetomo (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 15:07
(Received via mailing list)
Dear Experts.

I come from LEAF user community.

I'm a damn stupid newbie about RUBY.
I just impresed by someone who post about how easy to write a JABBER
client
using ruby.

Since I come from a community of users of Small linux distro, my concern
is
about a micro Ruby "distro" (maybe like Micro Perl)

So Here is my question :

1. Is there anyone can give me a list of extremely minimal files that
have
to be compiled to got ruby core interreter work properly ?
2. What is the minimal libs have to be loaded/compiled to write :
++ Jabber client
++ BASH similar : Cat, Cut, sed

I'm intended to compile of that minimal files with uCLib .. and may be
create a "*.lrp" package for the LEAF community.

Sincerely
-bino-
753dcb78b3a3651127665da4bed3c782?d=identicon&s=25 Brian Candler (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 16:25
(Received via mailing list)
On Sun, Apr 08, 2007 at 10:05:24PM +0900, bino_oetomo wrote:
>
> I'm intended to compile of that minimal files with uCLib .. and may be
> create a "*.lrp" package for the LEAF community.

A full Ruby distribution is about one-third of the size of a base Perl
distribution, and yet includes a lot of stuff missing from base Perl
(such
as openssl libraries)

Now, I can't give you an exact answer to your question. If you look at
ext/Setup you'll see a bunch of 'optional' C libraries you can disable
or
enable. You can leave them all disabled of course, but things like
'socket'
would be important for network clients.

However, most of the libraries supplied with Ruby are written in Ruby.
You'll have to look at the sizes of them and decide which you want to
leave
out. If you don't want an XML parser, then you can leave out REXML (but
then
again, Jabber is an XML-based protocol I believe).

Regards,

Brian.
Ad7805c9fcc1f13efc6ed11251a6c4d2?d=identicon&s=25 Alex Young (regularfry)
on 2007-04-08 18:28
(Received via mailing list)
bino_oetomo wrote:
>
> So Here is my question :
>
> 1. Is there anyone can give me a list of extremely minimal files that have
> to be compiled to got ruby core interreter work properly ?
I can't answer this directly, but you may wish to see how Debian have
handled this - they've split Ruby up into several different packages for
(as far as I know) precisely this purpose.
38a02bf7121a81be5be6f3d488ce23b5?d=identicon&s=25 Alexey Verkhovsky (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 19:51
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/8/07, Alex Young <alex@blackkettle.org> wrote:
> > 1. Is there anyone can give me a list of extremely minimal files that have
> > to be compiled to got ruby core interreter work properly ?
> how Debian have
> handled this - they've split Ruby up into several different packages

Yeah, without providing a dependency package that just installs
EVERYTHING. Thereby creating a big maintenance headache for every Ruby
application out there. Grr...
3bb23e7770680ea44a2d79e6d10daaed?d=identicon&s=25 M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 20:18
(Received via mailing list)
Alex Young wrote:
>> Since I come from a community of users of Small linux distro, my
> for (as far as I know) precisely this purpose.
>
Well ... I know nothing about LEAF. :) But here's a few hints that might
jog someone's memory.

1. During the course of installing Perl from source, an entity called
"Mini Perl" (Minnie Pearl??) is generated. miniperl is used to bootstrap
the install and is, I think, still resident on your system when the full
Perl install has completed.

2. During the course of installing Ruby from source, there is a
"miniruby" built with similar uses. I don't remember whether miniruby
still exists after the install is done.

3. Micro Perl, on the other hand, is a separate project. It is a
stripped down Perl interpreter suitable for usage on "embedded" systems.
It has its own web site.

4. As far as I know, there is no "Micro Ruby" project, although I think
it's a great idea for someone who's into such things.

So for the original poster, I'd start by downloading the source Ruby
distribution and doing "configure", "make" and "make install" and
capture the log files of the operations. You'll see "miniperl" go by,
and you can figure out how it's built, what it's used for and where it
ends up. Or maybe someone else on the list can pick up where my
knowledge leaves off. I haven't dug into this because I'm doing other
things. :)

--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC(P)
http://borasky-research.net/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.
6ed4a727f8f6c71ca2f759008ec3febe?d=identicon&s=25 Kristoffer Lundén (stoffe)
on 2007-04-08 20:47
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/8/07, Alexey Verkhovsky <alexey.verkhovsky@gmail.com> wrote:
> On 4/8/07, Alex Young <alex@blackkettle.org> wrote:
> > > 1. Is there anyone can give me a list of extremely minimal files that have
> > > to be compiled to got ruby core interreter work properly ?
> > how Debian have
> > handled this - they've split Ruby up into several different packages
>
> Yeah, without providing a dependency package that just installs
> EVERYTHING. Thereby creating a big maintenance headache for every Ruby
> application out there. Grr...
>

I haven't actually had any problem due to this in Debian or Ubuntu,
but that might be considered a bug. You could at least file one and
see what the devs say... :)
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 20:49
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Apr 09, 2007 at 03:16:42AM +0900, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:
>
> So for the original poster, I'd start by downloading the source Ruby
> distribution and doing "configure", "make" and "make install" and
> capture the log files of the operations. You'll see "miniperl" go by,
> and you can figure out how it's built, what it's used for and where it
> ends up. Or maybe someone else on the list can pick up where my
> knowledge leaves off. I haven't dug into this because I'm doing other
> things. :)
.gsub!(/perl/, 'ruby')
38a02bf7121a81be5be6f3d488ce23b5?d=identicon&s=25 Alexey Verkhovsky (Guest)
on 2007-04-08 21:35
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/8/07, Kristoffer Lundén <kristoffer.lunden@gmail.com> wrote:
> > Yeah, without providing a dependency package that just installs
> > EVERYTHING. Thereby creating a big maintenance headache for every Ruby
> > application out there. Grr...
>
> I haven't actually had any problem due to this in Debian or Ubuntu,
> but that might be considered a bug. You could at least file one and
> see what the devs say... :)

I am not a Debian user, but in a couple of years of me being Instiki
maintainer I've seen perhaps a hundred "help me!" emails that
eventually came down to that same problem.

Needless to say, none of these people were experienced Ruby
programmers, they just wanted to use the application.
3bb23e7770680ea44a2d79e6d10daaed?d=identicon&s=25 M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 02:35
(Received via mailing list)
Chad Perrin wrote:
> .gsub!(/perl/, 'ruby')
>
Uh, yeah :) And:

1. The "miniruby" executable is left behind in the build directory but
apparently it isn't installed anywhere.
2. It is (on Linux, anyhow) an executable.

 $ file miniruby
miniruby: ELF 32-bit LSB executable, Intel 80386, version 1 (SYSV), for
GNU/Linux 2.6.9, dynamically linked (uses shared libs), not stripped

3. It can at least do this:

$ ./miniruby -e 'puts "Hello, world!"'
Hello, world!

So there you have it. What *else* miniruby can do I can't tell you. But
it's there after a build and apparently *not* installed.




--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC(P)
http://borasky-research.net/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.
Df13d29fbc02d6979b4e6d3a3ccb4e4a?d=identicon&s=25 bino_oetomo (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 03:02
(Received via mailing list)
Hi ...
----- Original Message -----
From: "Chad Perrin" <perrin@apotheon.com>
To: "ruby-talk ML" <ruby-talk@ruby-lang.org>
Sent: Monday, April 09, 2007 1:47 AM
Subject: Re: Minimum ruby installation.
> --
> CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
> print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);
>
>

Kindly please don't missunderstanding about me.
I am not PERL hacker.
I'm just a LEAF (ucBering) user.
The only scripting language that I "knew" currently is BASH.
I never get in touch with servers .. the only network engine that I got
in
touch is Router and Firewall.
And I'm dreaming of using ruby (and Jabber protocol) as two-way network
management system.

sincerely
-bino-
0c135ce588f0544885c4957ba1639c9e?d=identicon&s=25 Uma Geller (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 03:11
(Received via mailing list)
> 1. Is there anyone can give me a list of extremely minimal files that have
> to be compiled to got ruby core interreter work properly ?
> 2. What is the minimal libs have to be loaded/compiled to write :
> ++ Jabber client
> ++ BASH similar : Cat, Cut, sed

It seems others have done work on embedded systems
with Ruby before, so this may be useful.

some links on MiniRuby:

http://wiki.rubygarden.org/Ruby/page/search?search...

please let us know about your project progress

good luck !
Ac0085dae0703db56ad7f8cb9e1798ba?d=identicon&s=25 Phillip Gawlowski (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 03:58
(Received via mailing list)
bino_oetomo wrote:

>> CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
>> print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);

> Kindly please don't missunderstanding about me.
> I am not PERL hacker.

Chad Perrin's signatures are more-or-less randomly generated.


--
Phillip "CynicalRyan" Gawlowski
http://cynicalryan.110mb.com/

Rule of Open-Source Programming #11:

When a developer says he will work on something, he or she means
"maybe".
Fd22ee3cfc7dac283ce8e451af324f7d?d=identicon&s=25 Chad Perrin (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 08:43
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Apr 09, 2007 at 10:57:27AM +0900, Phillip Gawlowski wrote:
> bino_oetomo wrote:
>
> >>CCD CopyWrite Chad Perrin [ http://ccd.apotheon.org ]
> >>print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);
>
> >Kindly please don't missunderstanding about me.
> >I am not PERL hacker.
>
> Chad Perrin's signatures are more-or-less randomly generated.

Indeed.

I'm thinking of replacing the current script I use for that by writing
one in Ruby.  I'm going to keep the Perl sig in the list, though.
2b4da3f15e2d0f58be623bf40795de07?d=identicon&s=25 Dan Stevens (IAmAI) (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 12:42
(Received via mailing list)
Perhaps a small advert for RubyMentor in the Welcome message for this
mailing list would be a nice idea?
8f6f95c4bd64d5f10dfddfdcd03c19d6?d=identicon&s=25 Rick Denatale (rdenatale)
on 2007-04-09 15:00
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/8/07, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <znmeb@cesmail.net> wrote:

>
> $ ./miniruby -e 'puts "Hello, world!"'
> Hello, world!
>
> So there you have it. What *else* miniruby can do I can't tell you. But
> it's there after a build and apparently *not* installed.

It's a build tool, which is why it's not installed.  It's used to
bootstrap building the real ruby since some of the installation tools
like instruby.rb, and extmk.rb are written in Ruby so a minimal ruby
is needed to install ruby!

What it can and can't do is a little mysterious, and appears to be
platform dependent.

http://article.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lang.ruby.general/68084
--
Rick DeNatale

My blog on Ruby
http://talklikeaduck.denhaven2.com/
3bb23e7770680ea44a2d79e6d10daaed?d=identicon&s=25 M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 16:11
(Received via mailing list)
Rick DeNatale wrote:
>>
> like instruby.rb, and extmk.rb are written in Ruby so a minimal ruby
> is needed to install ruby!
>
> What it can and can't do is a little mysterious, and appears to be
> platform dependent.
>
> http://article.gmane.org/gmane.comp.lang.ruby.general/68084
In any event, I doubt if it will ever be something "supported for
general use and widely useful", which is what I suspect the original
poster wants. I haven't had much chance to fool around with Rubinius
yet, but that looks to me like the way to get something like this --
most of Rubinius is written in "the real Ruby" and should be capable of
making a micro Ruby interpreter.

--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky, FBG, AB, PTA, PGS, MS, MNLP, NST, ACMC(P)
http://borasky-research.net/

If God had meant for carrots to be eaten cooked, He would have given
rabbits fire.
1c0cd550766a3ee3e4a9c495926e4603?d=identicon&s=25 John Joyce (Guest)
on 2007-04-09 17:06
(Received via mailing list)
RubyMentor should request a link and a blurb on as many of the Ruby
and Rails local user group sites as possible. This is surely one of
the most effective and useful ways to reach a mentor locally!
753dcb78b3a3651127665da4bed3c782?d=identicon&s=25 Brian Candler (Guest)
on 2007-08-16 21:37
(Received via mailing list)
On Sun, Apr 08, 2007 at 10:05:24PM +0900, bino_oetomo wrote:
>
> 1. Is there anyone can give me a list of extremely minimal files that have
> to be compiled to got ruby core interreter work properly ?

You have to compile the whole thing. If you wish, you can disable the
building of the C native extensions (such as socket, zlib etc) - but
they
all are built as separate .so loadable modules, so you might as well
just
build them and then not copy them onto the target system if you don't
want
them.

> 2. What is the minimal libs have to be loaded/compiled to write :
> ++ Jabber client
> ++ BASH similar : Cat, Cut, sed

Your Jabber client will need at least socket, and probably an XML parser
like REXML. There may be a higher-level Jabber library which you can
use.

Bash-like functionality probably doesn't need any libraries, although
you
might want readline.

> I'm intended to compile of that minimal files with uCLib .. and may be
> create a "*.lrp" package for the LEAF community.

In case it's of interest, there's a ruby-1.8.6 package for OpenWrt
http://www.openwrt.org/
https://dev.openwrt.org/browser/packages/lang/ruby

I made a squashfs filesystem containing for a complete OpenWrt
installation
with all the usual bits (kernel, uclibc etc) plus ruby with an almost
complete(*) set of ruby libraries, and the whole lot takes 2.8MB. So it
fits
quite nicely in a device with 4MB flash.

It might be possible to slice'n'dice the ruby standard libraries so that
parts can be omitted, but deciding how to put them into coherent bundles
may
be hard, and other people would probably disagree with your choices. For
example, you could argue that all XML and YAML plus everything that
depends
on them (e.g. SOAP, XMLRPC) should go in a library bundle. But that
wouldn't
be much use to you, as your Jabber client would probably want at least
REXML, in which case you'll end up loading everything else.

If memory really is that tight, I'd say it's probably easier to work the
other way round: start with just ruby and *no* libraries. Give your
application a lib/ directory and manually install in there all the
libraries
that you find you need to make it work.

Regards,

Brian.

(*) Actually, rdoc, test::unit and nkf are in separate packages and I
left
these out. But it includes all the rest of the .rb libraries, plus C
extensions such as socket and yaml, and irb.
31ab75f7ddda241830659630746cdd3a?d=identicon&s=25 Austin Ziegler (austin)
on 2007-08-16 21:47
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/8/07, Alex Young <alex@blackkettle.org> wrote:
> I can't answer this directly, but you may wish to see how Debian have
> handled this - they've split Ruby up into several different packages for
> (as far as I know) precisely this purpose.

Except that Debian got it wrong and split some things out based on
politics instead of technical considerations (e.g., the openssl issue
in Debian). And split things out further than they should have been.

To answer the OP: you definitely don't need Tk by default. You need
zlib and openssl to get full RubyGems (including signed gem) support.
Jabber can be handled with Jabber4R which requires REXML (included
with the Ruby stdlib).

-austin
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