Ruby on Rails IDE

Johndel Deliyiannis wrote:

Why do you want to use either, instead of something like KomodoEdit or
TextMate?

[…]

Komodoedit… hmmm I don’t know him, I might try it but I doubt it can
compare with vim and emacs, this editors are used from programmers
many years.

If you don’t know about it, then why are you dismissing it out of hand?
Try it!

I have used all the three and it is clear that Vim and Emacs is the
way to go for me, but I can’t decide clearly… I am a bit more for
emacs.

Why do you think it is silly to use it on a GUI box? :slight_smile:

Because console editors are great for text-only environments, but are
less generally usable than GUI editors. I love Emacs in SSH sessions or
for quick edits in the Terminal, but I go nuts very quickly when I have
to use it on a GUI box. There are many things that simply work better
with a mouse and a menu-driven interface. No console-only editor can
give me that, and therefore no console-only editor is suitable to use on
a GUI box by my standards. (No, Xemacs is not the answer – it sucks.)

Best,

Marnen Laibow-koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Leonardo M. wrote:

I use Vim. Mostly because it just feels good for me, with the right
plugins I have everything I use on every IDE I’ve used before (that
is, code competion, syntax highlighting, code reference, tabs, and a
few more).

As long as Vim uses that damn modal editing (i.e. ‘i’ for insert, Escape
to exit insert and ‘:’ for commands) I won’t be switching to it.

Before you call me crazy… I understand Vim, and I use it when
absolutely necessary. If that’s your thing, then great for you. I’m just
saying it’s not for me, so I’ll stick with TextMate. At least until I
find something better. However, every time I’ve tried alternatives I
just keep coming back to TextMate.

With reference to Aptana terminal tabs for Rails console, server &
general command line you wrote:

I find this nearly useless for Rails. I’d rather use a real terminal
program (on Mac OS, that means iTerm).

Care to be more specific? A terminal is only as good as the shell you
choose, and how you configure it. Everything else is just “window
dressing” so to speak! :slight_smile: What Rails command line related activity
can you perform in iTerm (or any other for that matter) that you can’t
in a shell embedded an IDE?

How recently have you used NetBeans?

Last week! I just found it too big and bloated for Rails needs
compared to Aptana. Those who subscibe to the “an editor is enough”
would rightly say the same about Aptana or any other Rails capable
IDE.

As I made a point of saying at both the beginning and end of my post,
the OP needs to try a few out and see what works for him, but since he
specifically asked about IDEs. Unfortunately as is often the cae with
these subjects, it is already degenerating into a mine is better than
yours, IDE vs. Editor, GUI vs Command Line Editor, VI vs EMACS debate,
even if not yet an outright flamewar…

Matt.

On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 6:06 PM, Robert W. [email protected]
wrote:

Leonardo M. wrote:

I use Vim. Mostly because it just feels good for me, with the right
plugins I have everything I use on every IDE I’ve used before (that
is, code competion, syntax highlighting, code reference, tabs, and a
few more).

As long as Vim uses that damn modal editing (i.e. ‘i’ for insert, Escape
to exit insert and ‘:’ for commands) I won’t be switching to it.
I’m not trying to convince anyone to use Vim, have you read how many
times I said “…feels good for you…”?
If you don’t like it, then don’t use it.
That “damn modal editing” you says is an esential part of Vim. If you
don’t like it, then Vim is not for you.

Before you call me crazy…
I wont.
I understand Vim, and I use it when
absolutely necessary. If that’s your thing, then great for you. I’m just
saying it’s not for me, so I’ll stick with TextMate. At least until I
find something better. However, every time I’ve tried alternatives I
just keep coming back to TextMate.
Ok, so TextMate is what feels good (or great, or whatever) for you.


Leonardo M…
There’s no place like ~

MattB wrote:

With reference to Aptana terminal tabs for Rails console, server &
general command line you wrote:

I find this nearly useless for Rails. I’d rather use a real terminal
program (on Mac OS, that means iTerm).

Care to be more specific? A terminal is only as good as the shell you
choose, and how you configure it. Everything else is just “window
dressing” so to speak! :slight_smile: What Rails command line related activity
can you perform in iTerm (or any other for that matter) that you can’t
in a shell embedded an IDE?

None. I just haven’t found the IDE shells to be very pleasant to use.

How recently have you used NetBeans?

Last week! I just found it too big and bloated for Rails needs

I agree with that. I just don’t agree that it’s slow and clunky in
general, at least on Mac OS.

compared to Aptana. Those who subscibe to the “an editor is enough”
would rightly say the same about Aptana or any other Rails capable
IDE.

Right.

As I made a point of saying at both the beginning and end of my post,
the OP needs to try a few out and see what works for him, but since he
specifically asked about IDEs.

But the way he asked, it was clear that he assumed one was required.

Unfortunately as is often the cae with
these subjects, it is already degenerating into a mine is better than
yours, IDE vs. Editor, GUI vs Command Line Editor, VI vs EMACS debate,
even if not yet an outright flamewar…

My editor is better than yours, at least for me. :slight_smile:

Seriously, I used to use Aptana for Rails, but stopped when I realized I
was only using it as an editor.

Try working in Rails without an IDE if you haven’t already. I believe
you will be happier.

Matt.

Best,

–Â
Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Sent from my iPhone

Michael S. wrote:

On Wednesday 25 August 2010, Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

How recently have you used NetBeans?

Last week! I just found it too big and bloated for Rails needs

I agree with that. I just don’t agree that it’s slow and clunky in
general, at least on Mac OS.

This seems like the perfect time to lodge my complaints :wink:

I’ve been using NetBeans 6.9 for a couple of weeks now and it seems to
be disintegrating over time

Yeah, my recollection last time I used it with Rails was that the
integration wasn’t terribly good. Oy.

[…]

And, worst of all, at times the editor completely freezes for
from 30 secs to over a minute.

I have occasionally seen this on Mac OS when I’ve been doing very
resource-heavy stuff.

For none of these I’ve found a way to cure it. Particularly the freezing
problem seems already to have been reported as a bug more than 50 times.

NetBeans’ core team seem to be very skilled programmers, but often
somewhat unresponsive to bug reports. Rather like some other core
teams… :slight_smile:

Yes, I’m still using NetBeans. The alternatives (on Linux) such as Emacs
and Eclipse/Aptana are no more attractive and I’ve used them both
before.

There are other alternatives for Linux. In descending order, I’d
recommend KomodoEdit, jEdit, or gEdit.

[…]

Michael


Michael S.
mailto:[email protected]
http://www.schuerig.de/michael/

Best,
–Â
Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Sent from my iPhone

On Wednesday 25 August 2010, Marnen Laibow-Koser wrote:

How recently have you used NetBeans?

Last week! I just found it too big and bloated for Rails needs

I agree with that. I just don’t agree that it’s slow and clunky in
general, at least on Mac OS.

This seems like the perfect time to lodge my complaints :wink:

I’ve been using NetBeans 6.9 for a couple of weeks now and it seems to
be disintegrating over time. At some point it became convinced that I’m
working with Rails 2.x, which I am not, and now tries to run non-
existing script/server. In new files, NetBeans’s own templates are not
expanded. I never found a way to make the debugger work with Rails 3 and
bundler. And, worst of all, at times the editor completely freezes for
from 30 secs to over a minute.

For none of these I’ve found a way to cure it. Particularly the freezing
problem seems already to have been reported as a bug more than 50 times.

Yes, I’m still using NetBeans. The alternatives (on Linux) such as Emacs
and Eclipse/Aptana are no more attractive and I’ve used them both
before. Although I more or less know Emacs for 20 years, its features
beyond editing are too arcane for me. Aptana, particularly
RadRails/Studio for Rails 3, had still many problems of their own, last
time I looked.

Michael


Michael S.
mailto:[email protected]
http://www.schuerig.de/michael/

Bb Serviss wrote:

Netbeans works well, if you’re concerned about the bloat/response
simply turn some of the features off. I’ve used Rails for a few years
and a basic editor just seems so, well basic.

Right! What more do you need?

Netbeans isn’t perfect,
I don’t use it to run the server or do the tests

Then why bother with it? You’re just using it as a basic editor – and
for that, KomodoEdit blows it out of the water.

but for the simple
pleasure of jumping between controller method to view just cannot be
beat.

I’ll agree that that’s convenient, and one of the few things I miss from
RadRails. But I don’t miss it that much, particularly when Cmd-Sh-O in
Komodo opens any file from a few characters of its name.

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Netbeans works well, if you’re concerned about the bloat/response
simply turn some of the features off. I’ve used Rails for a few years
and a basic editor just seems so, well basic. Netbeans isn’t perfect,
I don’t use it to run the server or do the tests but for the simple
pleasure of jumping between controller method to view just cannot be
beat.

If you’re on Linux with KDE, Kate works well as a basic editor.

Windoze - try Notepad++, very lightweight and easy to use.

But in the end, it’s your preference. Find something you’re
comfortable with and go with it.

This is discussion has been very helpful to me: I’m learning Rails
(and Ruby), so far I’ve primarily been using Emacs and command line.
But I also I had given NetBeans (and a couple of other IDEs) a brief
try on the off-chance that I was missing out on something that I would
like to have.

I found that Emacs and shell window works well for the way I work,
though. :). I’m using EmacsW32+nXhtml (see:
http://ourcomments.org/Emacs/nXhtml/doc/nxhtml.html#summary) and a
shell window. :slight_smile:

On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 15:55, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected] wrote:

Because console editors are great for text-only environments, but are
less generally usable than GUI editors. I love Emacs in SSH sessions or
for quick edits in the Terminal, but I go nuts very quickly when I have
to use it on a GUI box. There are many things that simply work better
with a mouse and a menu-driven interface. No console-only editor can
give me that, and therefore no console-only editor is suitable to use on
a GUI box by my standards. (No, Xemacs is not the answer – it sucks.)

Interesting. I’m of almost opposite mind: I prefer to use emacs on a
GUI platform; I hop back-and-forth between being in a “keyboard only”
mode when doing stuff in emacs to “mousing, mouse cut-n-paste, etc.”
mode when I flip to some other window. If I have to use emacs in the
non-gui environment, I feel locked in, and if it goes on for very
long, I’ll find some way to switch to a gui environment to do the
work.

On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 22:23, Agoofin [email protected] wrote:

I don’t use it to run the server or do the tests but for the simple
pleasure of jumping between controller method to view just cannot be
beat.

Indeed. That was one thing I was looking for when I trying out
NetBeans. I was finding that the way the files are arranged for a
Rails application and switching amongst them in dired was painful.

On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 22:23, Agoofin [email protected] wrote:

Windoze - try Notepad++, very lightweight and easy to use.

A good recommendation. Its lightweight, follows the windows paradigm,
has syntax highlighting that is easily configurable. It tempted me
away from Emacs for a while. :slight_smile:

On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 22:23, Agoofin [email protected] wrote:

But in the end, it’s your preference. Find something you’re comfortable with and go with it.

Very true. Requires a fair bit of investment of time, also. Trying out
new IDEs, editors, tools, working in them long enough to determine
whether they help or hinder the way you work, and then learning the
one you like more thoroughly.

As I write this, I’m trying to recall what I didn’t like about
NetBeans, and realizing I can’t explain precisely, which makes me
wonder if I should try it again more objectively. :slight_smile:

Iain

Your attitude is similar enough to mine, if I understand it correctly,
that I suspect if you try a good graphical editor like KomodoEdit or
jEdit, you won’t go back to Emacs in GUI situations.

grin. Certainly possible. I think I tried KomodoEdit, but that was
long while ago, who knows how I’d feel about it now. Needs change, and
products change as well. :slight_smile:

It never ceases to amaze me that people seem to think the only options
are NetBeans, Eclipse/Aptana, TextMate, vi, and Emacs. There are lots
of good editors out there…

There are days when it seems like there is as many as there are
programmers. Maybe more. :slight_smile:

It could be that I keep coming back to Emacs because it seems the most
easily bent to “latest new thing I’m learning or working with” without
relearning the basics. In part because, it has been around a very long
time so there is plenty of tech notes, stuff to download to enhance
it, etc. For instance, last year I was doing some stuff in OCAML, a
brief search turned up Tuareg-mode for editing and executing OCAML
files. :slight_smile:

I also will switch editors depending which things I’m actually working
on…there was a while that I was juggling two different projects, one
that I wrote code in MSVC for, and the other I was doing stuff in
Emacs. :slight_smile:

Hmm. I wonder what support NetBeans has for latex. Time for a web
search.

Iain

Iain D. wrote:

This is discussion has been very helpful to me: I’m learning Rails
(and Ruby), so far I’ve primarily been using Emacs and command line.
But I also I had given NetBeans (and a couple of other IDEs) a brief
try on the off-chance that I was missing out on something that I would
like to have.

I found that Emacs and shell window works well for the way I work,
though. :). I’m using EmacsW32+nXhtml (see:
http://ourcomments.org/Emacs/nXhtml/doc/nxhtml.html#summary) and a
shell window. :slight_smile:

On Tue, Aug 24, 2010 at 15:55, Marnen Laibow-Koser
[email protected] wrote:

Because console editors are great for text-only environments, but are
less generally usable than GUI editors. �I love Emacs in SSH sessions or
for quick edits in the Terminal, but I go nuts very quickly when I have
to use it on a GUI box. �There are many things that simply work better
with a mouse and a menu-driven interface. �No console-only editor can
give me that, and therefore no console-only editor is suitable to use on
a GUI box by my standards. �(No, Xemacs is not the answer – it sucks.)

Interesting. I’m of almost opposite mind:

No, I don’t really think you are. See below.

I prefer to use emacs on a
GUI platform; I hop back-and-forth between being in a “keyboard only”
mode when doing stuff in emacs to “mousing, mouse cut-n-paste, etc.”
mode when I flip to some other window. If I have to use emacs in the
non-gui environment, I feel locked in, and if it goes on for very
long, I’ll find some way to switch to a gui environment to do the
work.

Exactly! I prefer working in a graphical environment as well. But my
point was that in a graphical environment, it makes more sense to use an
editor that’s been designed for a graphical environment – in other
words, not Emacs, but a good GUI editor like KomodoEdit. I feel locked
in when I use Emacs in a console environment, but there’s nothing I can
really do about it. I feel even more locked in when I use (console)
Emacs in a GUI environment, because I know there are other editors where
I could use the mouse.

Your attitude is similar enough to mine, if I understand it correctly,
that I suspect if you try a good graphical editor like KomodoEdit or
jEdit, you won’t go back to Emacs in GUI situations.

It never ceases to amaze me that people seem to think the only options
are NetBeans, Eclipse/Aptana, TextMate, vi, and Emacs. There are lots
of good editors out there…

Best,

Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Aptana, particularly
RadRails/Studio for Rails 3, had still many problems of their own, last
time I looked.

If that was Aptana Studio 2, it might be worth another look at Studio
3 beta. Works great for me with Rails 3. I’m on a Mac though, so can’t
comment on how it looks or behaves under Linux. Your own requirements
are ultimately what counts though, so it may not be the one for you,
and there are plenty of other choices, but if NetBeans isn’t doing it
for you…

On Wednesday 25 August 2010, Bill W. wrote:

Sorry to jump in mid-stream here, but…

On Aug 25, 12:29 am, Michael S. [email protected] wrote:

Last week! I just found it too big and bloated for Rails needs

Make sure you’re using the Ruby-only version of NB unless you really
need the other stuff. There’s definitely a difference. My first
experience with NB was with the ‘fulll’ package and it was very
disappointing. The Ruby-only version was a big improvement.

That’s what I’m using. I’ve had version 6.9 installed with regular
updates, but now I’ve installed 6.9.1 and things look slightly better.

My ~/.netbeans/6.9 directory has grown to an amazing 856MB, largely
consisting of downloaded updates, I reckon. Is there a way to delete the
obsolete stuff without losing preferences?

Michael


Michael S.
mailto:[email protected]id
http://www.schuerig.de/michael/

Sorry to jump in mid-stream here, but…

On Aug 25, 12:29 am, Michael S. [email protected] wrote:

Last week! I just found it too big and bloated for Rails needs

Make sure you’re using the Ruby-only version of NB unless you really
need the other stuff. There’s definitely a difference. My first
experience with NB was with the ‘fulll’ package and it was very
disappointing. The Ruby-only version was a big improvement.

Best regards,
Bill

On Wed, Aug 25, 2010 at 3:22 PM, Michael S. [email protected]
wrote:

My ~/.netbeans/6.9 directory has grown to an amazing 856MB, largely
consisting of downloaded updates, I reckon.

Ouch. OTOH, that’s like $0.10 worth of storage now, right?

Is there a way to delete the obsolete stuff without losing preferences?

That’s a good question and I don’t know the answer. Be worth asking
on the NB list. Personally, I don’t let any software do automatic
updates anymore.

Best regards,
Bill

On 25 August 2010 20:08, Bill W. [email protected] wrote:

Sorry to jump in mid-stream here, but…

On Aug 25, 12:29 am, Michael S. [email protected] wrote:

Last week! I just found it too big and bloated for Rails needs

Make sure you’re using the Ruby-only version of NB unless you really
need the other stuff.

The “Ruby” version is very bloated - including Glassfish and a whole
bunch of stuff you probably don’t need.
Install the bare version (although I personally go for the PHP version
as it’s the smallest of the packaged downloads, and I do the
occasional bit of PHP) and add the “Ruby and Rails” plugin.

And yes, the debugging works fine (apart from “break on error”);
conditional breakpoints, watches, variable tracking, immediate
evaluation (that one is a bit clunky though…); and has done since
the first time I tried it in Jan 2009.

Michael P. wrote:

On 25 August 2010 22:20, Michael P. [email protected] wrote:

and has done since the first time I tried it in Jan 2009.

Correction, it was April when I got debugging working :slight_smile:

Good to know. Maybe the problem had to do with using JRuby on this
project (which is a Swing/Monkeybars app, so I can’t use MRI).

Best,
–Â
Marnen Laibow-Koser
http://www.marnen.org
[email protected]

Sent from my iPhone

On 25 August 2010 22:20, Michael P. [email protected] wrote:

and has done since the first time I tried it in Jan 2009.

Correction, it was April when I got debugging working :slight_smile:

I do really recommend checking out RubyMine from JetBrains - it is
designed specificaly for Ruby/Rails. Just give it a try and You will
search no longer

This forum is not affiliated to the Ruby language, Ruby on Rails framework, nor any Ruby applications discussed here.

| Privacy Policy | Terms of Service | Remote Ruby Jobs