Most popular IDEs for Ruby on Rails development

Vi is my favorite editor on linux (ubuntu karmic koala)
rails.vim plugin adds syntax highlighting and auto indentation support
to
it.
Installation help
clickhttp://www.funonrails.com/2010/02/vim-editor-for-ruby-on-rails.html

On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 11:32 PM, Michael S.
[email protected]wrote:


Sandip


www.funonrails.com

I use RubyMine. Disabled all plugins I don’t use, it does the job for
me.

Um, because it’s not? Because its easy and fast?

Already there was a discussion on same topic few days back in the
community… just google before you post any :wink:
IDE
Discussionhttp://groups.google.co.in/group/rubyonrails-talk/browse_thread/thread/8959e8226604ba68/d7137b7c6e18fa65?lnk=gst&q=IDE#d7137b7c6e18fa65

Best Wishes,
Saideep Annadatha

Hi Krum,

You didn’t say which OS you were interested in…

I’m new to RoR (6 months in, so take what want from my comments) and
use Aptana Studio, and before I get all the flames from the Rails
gurus regarding IDE’s over command line tools can I just say that it’s
because my front end is usually Flex, which, like Aptana is built on
Eclipse, so when I was getting started it seemed natural.

I like the Aptana IDE because it also provides a very simple way of
hooking in to the server. Being new to Rails, and coming from a
Windows background, I like the Graphical UI.

That said, I have always used the Shell for the usual Ruby/Rails/Rake/
Capistrano commands etc, and only really use Aptana Studio as the
editor and nothing more. There is no code hinting to get in the way,
but it will tell me if my syntax is wrong (ie unexpected kEND etc)
which is really all I need.

However, the last six months learning curve has been massive, and I am
moving more and more towards the Shell and away from the Windows UI
norms…so maybe one day I will shout about textmate or vim to do
my editing from the Shell - but not just yet :wink:

Paul

Greg D. wrote:
On Fri, Mar 12, 2010 at 10:04 AM, Michael S. <[email protected]> wrote:
  
http://static.destiney.com/emacs_screen_shot.jpg
      
There's one feature I've been missing in Emacs:
    
There are only missing features until you add them.

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/emacs-lisp-intro.html

Emacs can be made to do anything!



You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google
Groups “Ruby on Rails: Talk” group.

To post to this group, send email to
[email protected]

To unsubscribe from this group, send email to
[email protected]

For more options, visit this group at
http://groups.google.com/group/rubyonrails-talk?hl=en.

On 15 March 2010 17:40, Greg D. [email protected] wrote:

On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 11:22 AM, Norm S. wrote:

Emacs can be made to do anything!

And people who shy away from that power aren’t really programmers IMO.

Good job it’s worth a whole 2pence :-/

IDEs make me touch my mouse way too much. The longer I can keep my
hands directly on the keyboard, the more productive I am. It’s not
difficult to understand.

How is it harder to learn the IDE keyboard shortcuts that it is to
learn Emacs’? Typically, it would be worth adding “YMMV” to your
previous statement, because other people may find there isn’t a direct
correlation between the ratio of their keyboard:mouse contact and
their productivity - I’ve sat next to people at both extremes; of
typing lots of noise, and typing amazing code with very few
keypresses, regardless of their development environment.

(of course, YMMV :wink:

On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 11:22 AM, Norm S.
[email protected] wrote:

There are only missing features until you add them.

http://www.gnu.org/software/emacs/emacs-lisp-intro/emacs-lisp-intro.html

Emacs can be made to do anything!

And people who shy away from that power aren’t really programmers IMO.

IDEs make me touch my mouse way too much. The longer I can keep my
hands directly on the keyboard, the more productive I am. It’s not
difficult to understand.


Greg D.
destiney.com | gregdonald.com

On 15 March 2010 19:53, Greg D. [email protected] wrote:

How is it harder to learn the IDE keyboard shortcuts that it is to
learn Emacs’?

I didn’t say it was harder, but you only get what it came
pre-programmed with for the most part. Some of them offer some added
shortcut functionality but nothing anywhere close to the power of
making your own key binding in Lisp.

You commented that your primary objection to IDEs was that they cause
you to take your fingers off the keyboard - I suggested that it’s
possible to navigate through (Ruby) projects all day with little use
of the mouse, and also that some people aren’t that concerned about
the hassle involved in moving their hand to a different input
mechanism.

Sure, there’s loads of pro’s to your favoured development environment
(integrated or not) that cause you to experience great productivity;
given the OP’s query, that’s all valuable input for him (if he ever
comes back to this thread!) but it’s a little rude to dismiss people
as 2nd class or worse because of the tools they use, or the fact that
they care less about their RAM use, or shutting down their computer at
night; essentially because they have different priorities to you.

If its your job to write code then just write the code.

That’s certainly what a good corporate coding drone should do. I’m not
one of those; I certainly program, but I’m not a “programmer”
exclusively.

I’ve sat next to people at both extremes; of
typing lots of noise, and typing amazing code with very few
keypresses,

Yeah, that’s the .net people, plugging components together requires
very little typing, and very little programming skills for that
matter.

Can’t comment, I’m afraid, I’ve no particular exposure with .Net (and
it was not my intention to make a comment about different peoples’
productivity a reference to which language is “better”)

On Mon, Mar 15, 2010 at 2:09 PM, Michael P. [email protected]
wrote:

And people who shy away from that power aren’t really programmers IMO.

Good job it’s worth a whole 2pence :-/

I’ll take it. Paypal work?

How is it harder to learn the IDE keyboard shortcuts that it is to
learn Emacs’?

I didn’t say it was harder, but you only get what it came
pre-programmed with for the most part. Some of them offer some added
shortcut functionality but nothing anywhere close to the power of
making your own key binding in Lisp.

Another thing is I can start Emacs once and run it until my next
reboot, weeks or months from now. I have to restart Eclipse every few
hours or so. I can start Emacs in a screen and continue my work from
home later in the evening. I can background Emacs and type shell
commands. It’s so much more.

IDEs usually have a large memory footprint. Eclipse uses over half a
GB of ram on my system. Emacs uses 13MBs of ram, but that’s only
because I have a ton of stuff loaded like ERC, ECB, and Gnus.

Typically, it would be worth adding “YMMV” to your
previous statement, because other people may find there isn’t a direct
correlation between the ratio of their keyboard:mouse contact and
their productivity -

If its your job to write code then just write the code. Are you a
programmer or not?

I’ve sat next to people at both extremes; of
typing lots of noise, and typing amazing code with very few
keypresses,

Yeah, that’s the .net people, plugging components together requires
very little typing, and very little programming skills for that
matter.

regardless of their development environment.

(of course, YMMV :wink:

Yup.


Greg D.
destiney.com | gregdonald.com