About last night

On 7/27/06, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky [email protected] wrote:

The scary thing about this is that such high-powered demands are often a
bubble, which eventually bursts in a spectacular way. That’s not
something I think anyone wants to happen to Ruby, or even to Rails.

Well speaking as a recent convert (who finally subscribed to this list
a few days ago), it’s clear that the Ruby community is mature enough
that even if the bubble should burst, there’s still a core of
dedicated people who know what they’re doing and love the technology,
regardless of the hype, and will do what they need to to satisfy their
own desires from the language without worrying about what other people
think.

I admit, I checked it out because of the hype, but I’m genuinely
liking what I’m seeing digging into the language and into Rails. It’s
the happy middle ground between the perl and Java (which I primarly
work in right now). It’s got real objects but still has the
richness of perl (and not so much of the craziness of it that can bite
you in the foot.)

I hope to be here for the long haul, not just because it’s “hip.”

Just my $0.02.

From: “Benjamin R.” [email protected]

finally subscribed to this list a few days ago

Welcome !

I’m genuinely liking what I’m seeing digging into the language and
into Rails. It’s the happy middle ground between the perl and Java
(which I primarly > work in right now). It’s got real objects but
still has the richness of perl (and not so much of the craziness of
it that can bite you in the foot.)

Your post reminded me vividly how I felt discovering Ruby in
1999-2000, while undertaking Perl and Java projects at work.

:slight_smile:

I must say, I’ve never missed Type Globs or public static void
main(String[] args) { System.out.println(“Hello World!”); } since.

Regards,

Bill

On Jul 28, 2006, at 10:58 PM, Gus S Calabrese wrote:

the main focus will be on RUBY

The language is just Ruby. Or even ruby, if you are talking about
the interpreter itself. Never RUBY though. :wink:

James Edward G. II

On 7/28/06, Gus S Calabrese [email protected] wrote:

Based on what I am hearing, I am going to put together a follow-on
conference October 28 ( Sat ) thru Nov 3rd ( Friday )
Sat and Sunday will be informal and will be based at a mountain
retreat. The rest of the week will be in the Denver area.

Heck, I’m in, assuming I can’t do the RubyConf thing. I’m not afraid of
fire
or bugs or things that go rowr in the night (including fellow
Rubyists).

On Sat, Jul 29, 2006 at 03:39:15PM +0900, Charles O Nutter wrote:

On 7/28/06, Gus S Calabrese [email protected] wrote:

Based on what I am hearing, I am going to put together a follow-on
conference October 28 ( Sat ) thru Nov 3rd ( Friday )
Sat and Sunday will be informal and will be based at a mountain
retreat. The rest of the week will be in the Denver area.

Heck, I’m in, assuming I can’t do the RubyConf thing. I’m not afraid of fire
or bugs or things that go rowr in the night (including fellow Rubyists).

Ditto – barring life interfering, that’s something I’d like to do.
It’d probably be worth reporting on, for that matter. It’d be nice to
break even on a conference.

Francis C. wrote:

his death are at least a pleasure to read.)

What about a peer-reviewed, or at least refereed site for posters,
abstracts, and papers? Putting up perhaps 16 per month might be more
useful than what we have now. I’d contribute the bandwidth.

Ruby Code & Style would be extremely interested in articles developed
from non-accepted RubyConf proposals:

http://www.artima.com/rubycs
http://www.artima.com/rubycs/about.html

If you do not think you can provide a full article, please contact me
anyway and tell what you think you might want to publish. It would be
quite interesting to assemble a collection of abstracts and posters or
whatever we can arrange.

james DOT britt {at} gmail DOT com

On 7/28/06, [email protected] [email protected] wrote:

lucky 240.

addressed. They can’t be addressed by one conference.

It is an interesting argument, that the Ruby community has grown, from
tiny to quite large (at least if you count the size of the hype),
therefore Ruby is now too big for a single one track conference,
therefore Ruby is too big for one unifying conference that brings
all the leading developers together, therefore we should instead
focus on lots of regional mini-conferences. I don’t think I buy it.
Isn’t the whole point of a conference to hear from and meet the
leading practitioners from around the world in that field, be exposed
to their ideas and learn about the cutting edge of the field? Isn’t
the whole idea to get as many of these people together as possible in
the one place? How does lots of regional mini-conferences and a
de-emphasised main conference achieve this?

If by regional we mean a European Ruby conference, a Japanese
conference, a US conference, then I can see the point, international
travel can be expensive. If however, we mean a Portland/Seattle
conference, a Silicon Valley conference, an East Coast conference, a
Canadian conference, and if people go to these mini conferences but
don’t drive a few hours to go to the main (US) Ruby conference, then I
think this would have the consequence of fragmenting the community and
diluting the benefits of going to the main Ruby conference. I agree
with Tim B.'s point that regional conferences can be great and don’t
have to detract from one main conference that serves as the focal
point for the community (eg JavaOne), I just worry about the Ruby
community not having that focal point, or having multiple focal points
and losing cohesion (RubyGems is something that springs to mind as
something that may have only been possible due to the cohesive nature
of the Ruby community, and due to getting most of the interested
parties together at the one conference).

Also, I can’t help but feel that by restricting the number of tracks,
presentations, and attendees (if it is true that this is what is
happending), there might be a hint of elitism creeping in, that the
Ruby community might be losing some of the egalitarianism that
characterised it in the past. I would imagine the effect of such a
policy would be to make the conference more of an “in-crowd” event
rather than a melting-pot of different ideas and approaches, whether
that is the intention or not.

These three points are just my skeptical thoughts when I read about
this year’s Ruby conference, and the trend toward regional
mini-conferences. I don’t necessarily agree with all the points I’ve
made, I’m probably just being the devil’s advocate (I’m definitely a
strong believer in the benefits of local meetups, for instance, so I’m
not sure why I feel that conferences should be centralised). Please
feel free to point out the many ways that my skepticism is unfounded.

Matt

I guess folks just redefine things as they go along…
See the book " Mother Tongue"
http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0380715430/104-9796468-7208766?
v=glance&n=283155
AGSC

On 2006-Jul 28, at 22:56hrs PM, James Edward G. II wrote:

On Jul 28, 2006, at 10:58 PM, Gus S Calabrese wrote:

the main focus will be on RUBY

The language is just Ruby. Or even ruby, if you are talking about
the interpreter itself. Never RUBY though. :wink:

James Edward G. II

Gus S Calabrese
Denver, CO
720 222 1309 303 908 7716 cell
Please include and do not limit yourself to “spam2006”. I allow
everything with “spam2006” in the subject or text to pass my spam
filters.

Hi –

On Sat, 29 Jul 2006, Gus S Calabrese wrote:

Based on what I am hearing, I am going to put together a follow-on conference
October 28 ( Sat ) thru Nov 3rd ( Friday )
Sat and Sunday will be informal and will be based at a mountain retreat. The
rest of the week will be in the Denver area.
Presentations will be Monday through Thursday 0900 to 1200, break , 1330 to
1630. Friday is 0900 to 1300.
the main focus will be on RUBY

Please don’t write “RUBY”, especially if you’re going to give and
publicize a conference. I understand the whole thing about language
being elastic, etc., but you’d be doing a real disservice to a lot of
people (including, but not limited to, Matz) by introducing this
error, and the resultant confusion, into general Ruby discourse.

Thanks –

David

Begin forwarded message:

From: Gus S Calabrese [email protected]
Date: 2006,July 28 9:58:18 PM MDT
To: [email protected]
Subject: Re: About last night …

Based on what I am hearing, I am going to put together a follow-on
conference October 28 ( Sat ) thru Nov 3rd ( Friday )
Sat and Sunday will be informal and will be based at a mountain
retreat. The rest of the week will be in the Denver area.
Presentations will be Monday through Thursday 0900 to 1200, break ,
1330 to 1630. Friday is 0900 to 1300.
the main focus will be on RUBY
I am inviting presentations, especially in unusual areas such as
using RUBY to remote control via the web, VOIP apps using RUBY, etc.

Right now the mountain retreat will 5 star fun and 1 star luxury.
( basic amenities, food and shelter, campfires, under the stars video
projection
seminars ) Sat and Sunday will occur in the vicinity of Fairplay
which is pretty close to Breckenridge for those who want deluxe
sleeping arrangements.
We will have a shuttle service to Breckenridge Sat night. There is
shuttle service to Breckenridge from the Denver Iternational
( whoohah ) airport.

Monday thru Friday will be at Denver Metro areas that will seat 600
people. Weather permitting , some events will be outside.
This conference will be more like the SlamDance wanna be of
Sundance. Maybe more fun…

Gus Calabrese

On 2006-Jul 28, at 07:26hrs AM, [email protected] wrote:

Ruby Conference in Colorado

Gus S Calabrese
Denver, CO
720 222 1309 303 908 7716 cell
Please include and do not limit yourself to “spam2006”. I allow
everything with “spam2006” in the subject or text to pass my spam
filters.

Gus S Calabrese
Denver, CO
720 222 1309 303 908 7716 cell
Please include and do not limit yourself to “spam2006”. I allow
everything with “spam2006” in the subject or text to pass my spam
filters.

Charles O Nutter wrote:

or bugs or things that go rowr in the night (including fellow
Rubyists).

I’d say at a mountain retreat near Denver in late October/early
November, fire is your friend, bugs are non-existent and things that go
rowr in the night are less of a risk than frostbite or avalanches. :slight_smile:

Matt Pattison wrote:

the whole idea to get as many of these people together as possible in
the one place?

This may be a hold-over from a pre-Internet world.

I like the idea of a massive Ruby get-together; I’d like to go to a
conference and have a reasonable chance of talking to whomever is doing
anything in the Ruby universe. But I’m not a big fan of the Moscone
Centre, Sun ONE sort of assemblies. I think the earlier Ruby
conferences spoiled me.

The best part of the conferences have been the hallway track. As the
size of the crowd grows, they tend to become increasingly disjoint and
(to some extent) cliquish. So you end up with satellite gatherings
anyway.

(Maybe. I’m also playing Devil’s Advocate here.)

But there is no longer (and hasn’t been for a while) a need to get
everyone in the same room to hear a talk.


James B.

“Inside every large system there’s a small system trying to get out”.
- Chet Hendrickson

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