Forum: Ruby on Rails What's a good non-Apple OS for RoR developers' workstations?

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Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 22:59
We're building a small team of dedicated Rails developers. Apple support
is poor in our part of the world, which rules out one of the RoR
community favorites. Which OS would you recommend instead?

-Adam
Mick S. (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 23:06
Either Windows or Linux - the tools you need to develop RoR apps will
run on either :)
Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 23:11
Mick S. wrote:
> Either Windows or Linux - the tools you need to develop RoR apps will
> run on either :)

I've developed on Windows, and wouldn't consider the experience
particularly enjoyable :)

Linux was indeed better, but which flavor (i.e. distro) would you
recommend?

-Adam
Drew O. (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 23:13
Adam wrote:
> Mick S. wrote:
>> Either Windows or Linux - the tools you need to develop RoR apps will
>> run on either :)
>
> I've developed on Windows, and wouldn't consider the experience
> particularly enjoyable :)
>
> Linux was indeed better, but which flavor (i.e. distro) would you
> recommend?
>
> -Adam

I had a fairly easy time getting everything I needed running on Ubuntu,
plus it's by far the best Linux distro I've used.
dae (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 23:14
Adam wrote:

> Linux was indeed better, but which flavor (i.e. distro) would you
> recommend?
Why not try for exapmle Ubuntu?
Chris G. (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 23:20
Adam wrote:
> Linux was indeed better, but which flavor (i.e. distro) would you
> recommend?

Are you TRYING to start a 200-message-long flamewar? ;)

Personally, I primarily use a Mac, but Kubuntu (KDE distribution of
Ubuntu) is my favorite Linux desktop distribution and the one I use on
my home Linux server. You have to apt-get a number of packages before
you can get Rails working, but it's well-documented on the Rails wiki
and on a number of blogs.

Seriously, though, you can get Rails up and running on pretty much any
Linux distribution without too much trouble. If you don't already have a
preference, your decision will probably end up being based on what kind
of package manager you like, which desktop is the best, which
distribution has the best support, and a number of other factors having
nothing to do specifically with Ruby or Rails.
Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 23:37
Ok, so far it seems Ubuntu is the leading alternative for the Mac
platform.

Won't anyone suggest one of the BSDs? :-P

-Adam
Mark H. (Guest)
on 2007-01-17 23:45
Adam wrote:
> We're building a small team of dedicated Rails developers. Apple support
> is poor in our part of the world, which rules out one of the RoR
> community favorites. Which OS would you recommend instead?

How about OS X?  :-)

Seriously if I was forced not to use OS X I'd be on Ubuntu, its pretty
polished and supports Rails development very well.
Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 01:23
Thanks for all the replies.

Looks like Ubuntu is the clear winner here.

Regards,
-Adam
Thomas M. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 01:50
(Received via mailing list)
Hi,

Of those guys who are using Linux for Ruby development in general: do
you know of any good text editor for Linux (preferable GTK, but
doesn't really matter that much in the end) that supports folding?
I dual boot Mac OS and Ubuntu and while I generally like gedit on
Linux, it just doesn't compare to TextMate. And the major thing I am
missing in gedit is folding.

Thanks,
Thomas


2007/1/18, Mark H. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>:
Ed Hickey (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 01:52
(Received via mailing list)
http://rubyjedit.org/

On 1/17/07, Thomas M. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>
> > > community favorites. Which OS would you recommend instead?
> >
>
> >
>


--
Ed Hickey
Developer
Litmus Media
816-533-0409
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
A Member of Think Partnership, Inc
www.ThinkPartnership.com
Amex ticker symbol: THK
Prabhakar C. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 01:56
(Received via mailing list)
Ubuntu is great for Rails development. I use Ubuntu Edgy and really like
it.
Try it out ...
(Guest)
on 2007-01-18 01:56
(Received via mailing list)
Chris G. wrote:
> Adam wrote:
> > Linux was indeed better, but which flavor (i.e. distro) would you
> > recommend?
>
> Are you TRYING to start a 200-message-long flamewar? ;)
>
it's getting harder to start flamewars:

http://groups.google.com/group/rubyonrails-talk/br...
Ed Hickey (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 02:03
(Received via mailing list)
ive tried all three plattforms and still prefer linux, especially since
that's what im deploying to.
i run Ubuntu Edgy (but I'd recommed not using Edgy - use 6.06 "Dapper"
until
Edgy isn't so well, 'edgy')

ed


On 1/17/07, Adam <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> recommend?
>
> -Adam
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
> >
>


--
Ed Hickey
Developer
Litmus Media
816-533-0409
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
A Member of Think Partnership, Inc
www.ThinkPartnership.com
Amex ticker symbol: THK
Greg D. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 02:06
(Received via mailing list)
On 1/17/07, Adam <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> Linux was indeed better, but which flavor (i.e. distro) would you
> recommend?

For development it just doesn't matter that much.  Version numbers
aside, all Linux distros are 99% the same as far as their individual
software components.  For example they all have glibc, they all use
gcc, and they all boot up a Linux kernel.

There are differences however.  Do you want to deal with RPMs (RedHat
(Fedora), Suse, Mandriva) or deb packages (Debian, Ubuntu), or skip
the binary dependency madness altogether and just compile stuff from
source(LFS, Gentoo)?  Do you want bleeding edge new software(Mandriva,
Fedora), fairly modern software(Ubuntu, Gentoo, LFS) or ultra-stable,
slightly older software(Debian)?

KDE and Gnome will both run on any Linux distro.  Same goes for MySQL
and PostgreSQL, Apache, Lighttpd and Mongrel, and most any other
comparison you can think of.

Get a spool of CDs and a burner.  Download some ISOs and figure out
what you like best.  People will give you their opinion but then
that's all it is, an opinion.  Form your own I say.

And don't forget there is life beyond Linux.  I would definitely
choose Linux or a Mac over Windows for a desktop, but I would choose
FreeBSD over pretty much anything for a router.


--
Greg D.
http://destiney.com/
Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 02:14
Thomas M. wrote:
> Hi,
>
> Of those guys who are using Linux for Ruby development in general: do
> you know of any good text editor for Linux (preferable GTK, but
> doesn't really matter that much in the end) that supports folding?

gVim.

-Adam

> I dual boot Mac OS and Ubuntu and while I generally like gedit on
> Linux, it just doesn't compare to TextMate. And the major thing I am
> missing in gedit is folding.
>
> Thanks,
> Thomas
>
>
> 2007/1/18, Mark H. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>:
Larry K. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 05:14
(Received via mailing list)
You migt want to seach this list for previous posts on this subject, but
this works for me:

Fedora Core 6
Ruby 1.8.4 or 1.8.5
MySQL 5.0.x
gnome desktop
Radrails .0.7.1
Subversion

I found this  easy to maintain, ( I'm not a Linux guru, but, am still
required to maintain my own dev boxes).It's more stable and faster than
WindowsXP. I will probably use this same basic setup when my current app
goes to beta.  There are other great platforms that people on this list
are
using.  I seems to be more a matter of preference. You could even use
RoR
from plasmacode on WindowsXp with tortoiseSVN and InstantRails.
Good Luck and happy coding
-Larry


On 1/17/07, Adam <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
> >
>


--
Best Regards,
-Larry
"Work, work, work...there is no satisfactory alternative."
            --- E.Taft Benson
Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 10:34
Greg D. wrote:

> Do you want to deal with RPMs (RedHat
> (Fedora), Suse, Mandriva) or deb packages (Debian, Ubuntu), or skip
> the binary dependency madness altogether and just compile stuff from
> source(LFS, Gentoo)?

I had some good experience with .deb-based distros: Debian as server,
Ubuntu for the desktop. My experience with RPMs has been... not so good
:)

The only compelling RPM choice currently seems to be SuSE, but now
there's that commotion there about the deal with Microsoft, and SLED
obviously not being free. The condition of Ubuntu is definitely
preferable in that respect.

The only interesting alternative suggested in this and the other recent
thread is Gentoo. I never realized it was used by non-ricers! ;-)
(really, j/k)

Anyways some serious people seem to like it, and that's enough to put it
on my checklist for some future date.

WRT now, I'm probably going to go with KUbuntu (Dapper or Eft) because I
already had some good experience with it, and also some of the team
members are going to be introduced to Linux for the first time on this
team, so we should go with the easiest Linux flavor.

> Do you want bleeding edge new software(Mandriva,
> Fedora), fairly modern software(Ubuntu, Gentoo, LFS) or ultra-stable,
> slightly older software(Debian)?

Actually I didn't have any problems installing even the most recent
software on Ubuntu. Granted, Mandriva might make it easier - each
package management system can be oriented towards a different timeframe
of maturity.

In any case, it seems a Ruby/Rails development station shouldn't require
installations of the very latest software. The only place where you
might want bleeding edge is maybe the Ruby packages, and that commonly
goes either through gems or just downloading .rb files, so the distro
and its PM system doesn't matter anyway.

> --
> Greg D.
> http://destiney.com/

Thanks Greg,
-Adam
Prabhakar C. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 11:23
(Received via mailing list)
The heavyweight option would be to to run Eclipse and use RadRails. Also
Kate (the KDE editor) is pretty nice. Another option is Scribes. It
doesnt
have tabs but is a text mate like editor. There is always gvim :-)
Gianluca T. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 13:05
(Received via mailing list)
Adam ha scritto:
> good :)
> Anyways some serious people seem to like it, and that's enough to put
>
>
>> --
>> Greg D.
>> http://destiney.com/
>
> Thanks Greg,
> -Adam
>
I'm developing RoR apps under:

- Fedora Core 6 32 bit (at office on Acer Aspire 9510 with 2Gb ram and
Intel core duo processor 2 Ghz)
- Mandriva 2007 64 bit (at home on Acer Aspire 5030 with 1 Gb ram and
AMD Turion 64 1.8 Ghz)

For RoR developments purpose the two workstations are very good, I never
had problems (my surprise is that ruby and rails are running on 64 bit
with mysql 5 64 bit very, very, very well)

ruby -version
ruby 1.8.5 (2006-08-25) [x86_64-linux-gnu]

rails --version
Rails 1.1.6

gem --version
0.9.0

Have fun with RoR !
Tex
Neil W. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 13:16
(Received via mailing list)
Ubuntu, Dapper Drake.
Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 20:44
Prabhakar C. wrote:
> The heavyweight option would be to to run Eclipse and use RadRails. Also
> Kate (the KDE editor) is pretty nice. Another option is Scribes. It
> doesnt
> have tabs but is a text mate like editor. There is always gvim :-)

I used RadRails and various other Eclipse-based IDEs for a while.

Eclipse as a development platform seems to suffer from performance
problems. Though it was running on a pretty powerful machine with more
than enough resources, Eclipse froze up several times per day of
development. I talked to other developers, working on different
workstations. The also encountered those problems.

As for RadRails specifically, I don't see how that huge and cumbersome
Java development environment buys you much in return for performance
problems. At the time I tried it, and appearantly to this day, it didn't
have code completion or any other intellisense or object browsing
capablities. I couldn't find a major feature that RadRails had and the
much lighter GVim hadn't. In fact, GVim had some of the missing code
completion features that RadRails lacked (though they're still far from
perfect).

Vim runs on all platforms I know. It actually runs well on Windows. It's
lean, fast, and very productive. The only downside I can see is the
nearly vertical learning curve right at the beginning. But all in all,
it seems a solid choice.

-Adam
donut d. (Guest)
on 2007-01-18 22:11
I used KDevelop on Kubuntu and I like it.  It's fast.  The thing is it
doesn't have autocomplete.  Does GVim have autocomplete?  Is GVim the
same as Vim?
Adam (Guest)
on 2007-01-19 00:31
donut donut wrote:
> I used KDevelop on Kubuntu and I like it.  It's fast.  The thing is it
> doesn't have autocomplete.  Does GVim have autocomplete?  Is GVim the
> same as Vim?

GVim is the GUI version of Vim. Basically the same, but of course more
flexible UI since you're not bound to the console and its discontents.

Since version 7 (G)Vim has a powerful new feature called Omni Complete,
that enables the addition intellisense and code completion features with
VimScript.

The Ruby and particularly Rails' omni completion support still needs a
lot of tuning. Rails poses a formidable challenge for any code
completion implementation, because of how dynamic it is (think
ActiveRecord with its reliance on database table structure and all the
methods generated dynamically through #method_missing etc. But (G)Vim
still offers one of the most sophisticated Rails' development
environments
currently, imho.

-Adam
Joe C. (Guest)
on 2007-01-19 17:29
(Received via mailing list)
I had a bad time with ruby gems on Ubuntu.  The package manger didn't
have Ruby 1.8.5 and the latest patches that I needed so I tried
installing from source.  The ruby install went seamlessly, but gems
would fail to run since it was looking for zlib libraries in the
default locations and Ubuntu had moved them.

I hope it gets ironed out because I like the OS.  I never had a problem
developing on XP, but I'd prefer to be on linux.
donut d. (Guest)
on 2007-01-19 20:46
Joe C. wrote:
> I had a bad time with ruby gems on Ubuntu.  The package manger didn't
> have Ruby 1.8.5 and the latest patches that I needed so I tried
> installing from source.  The ruby install went seamlessly, but gems
> would fail to run since it was looking for zlib libraries in the
> default locations and Ubuntu had moved them.
>
> I hope it gets ironed out because I like the OS.  I never had a problem
> developing on XP, but I'd prefer to be on linux.

I had no problems installing rails on ubuntu Dapper Drake by following
the method here:
http://www.ubuntuforums.org/showpost.php?p=1159106...

I haven't tried the latest ubuntu Edgy but other people running Edgy
seem to have no problem using rails.
Eno (Guest)
on 2007-01-19 21:07
(Received via mailing list)
Adam wrote:

> I had some good experience with .deb-based distros: Debian as server,
> Ubuntu for the desktop. My experience with RPMs has been... not so good
> :)

I would never touch a distro that used RPMs :-)

> The only interesting alternative suggested in this and the other recent
> thread is Gentoo. I never realized it was used by non-ricers! ;-)
> (really, j/k)

There are plenty of sane smart people that use Gentoo on servers where
security and easy maintenance are important.
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