Forum: Ruby on Rails web site monitoring

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Phil S. (Guest)
on 2007-01-01 19:49
(Received via mailing list)
What do most people use for monitoring their sites?  Internally hosted
software like mint/nagios?  Or external services like keynote?  I'm
trying to gauge what the best options are....

thanks for any comments.
phil
Cédric H. (Guest)
on 2007-01-01 23:50
(Received via mailing list)
removed_email_address@domain.invalid a écrit :

> What do most people use for monitoring their sites?  Internally hosted
> software like mint/nagios?  Or external services like keynote?  I'm
> trying to gauge what the best options are....
>
> thanks for any comments.
> phil

I use Awstats : http://awstats.sourceforge.net/ and it works just fine.
matt (Guest)
on 2007-01-02 00:00
(Received via mailing list)
Did you mean monitoring, as in webstats, or monitoring as in security
monitoring?

Webstats --  Awstats (for political reasons, I refuse to use Webalizer,
but that is another option)

Security monitoring -- try Watchdog.
Phil S. (Guest)
on 2007-01-02 02:04
(Received via mailing list)
Actually I was thinking about detecting site problems (server down,
site not returning the expected values)....
Steve R. (Guest)
on 2007-01-02 02:18
(Received via mailing list)
try montastic or pingability

http://montastic.com/
http://pingability.com/




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Ed Hickey (Guest)
on 2007-01-02 17:15
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we're using Nagios to monitor a few dozen web and db servers.  it
works great but isn't exactly a 'snap' to setup.

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Ed
Jeremy McAnally (Guest)
on 2007-01-02 17:25
(Received via mailing list)
One way to do this is using HeartBeat: http://heartbeat.highgroove.com/

It's a Rails application that combines a number of tasks for Rails apps.

--Jeremy
Charles Brian Q. (Guest)
on 2007-01-02 18:58
(Received via mailing list)
What's nice about this application, if I must say so myself, is that
with it monitoring your site, you won't run into problems with mysql
timeout drops, espcially if you let it monitor an important page, like
say, user/signup or something like that.

We have more plans in store for Heartbeat, but our wonderful clients
are keeping us so busy, we haven't had time to roll out any of the new
stuff (like push button deployment using capistrano)!

Cheers, and let us know if you have any questions/feedback.
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Michael S. (Guest)
on 2007-01-09 01:09
(Received via mailing list)
I use www.site24x7.com to monitor my sites. It's free, simple, and
seems to work well. It will monitor a URL as frequently as ever 5
minutes and it provides nice graphical reporting. It can also be set up
to test a transaction, and you can set various email and sms alerts.

Michael S.
www.mslater.com
Ross R. (Guest)
on 2007-01-09 02:02
(Received via mailing list)
Monit is also good. Spots high memory usage, long timeouts and will do
force quits and restarts if there's a problem that doesn't resolve.



On 1/8/07, Michael S. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
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