Forum: Ruby foo bar

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Corey K. (Guest)
on 2006-05-14 05:11
where does all the foo and bar references come from, is that from
duntemans assembly book from way back in the day? He had a fake martian
counting system with foo bar bas foobidity etc to use as an example of
how to think differently ab out numbers. Its interesting how that has
become almost a standard with code examples in so many languages.
Pat M. (Guest)
on 2006-05-14 05:27
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/13/06, corey konrad <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> where does all the foo and bar references come from, is that from
> duntemans assembly book from way back in the day? He had a fake martian
> counting system with foo bar bas foobidity etc to use as an example of
> how to think differently ab out numbers. Its interesting how that has
> become almost a standard with code examples in so many languages.
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
>
>

Don't know how accurate it is, but maybe check out
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foobar  I'll admit that I only skimmed
over it, but it seems to cover what you want.

Pat
Sergey V. (Guest)
on 2006-05-14 07:22
(Received via mailing list)
..
When â??fooâ?? is used in connection with â??barâ?? it has generally traced to
the
WWII-era Army slang acronym FUBAR (â??Fucked Up Beyond All Repairâ?? or
â??Fucked
Up Beyond All Recognitionâ??), ...

... and lot of many other interesting facts about programming history
and
culture you can find at
http://www.catb.org/jargon

----- Original Message -----
From: "corey konrad" <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
Newsgroups: comp.lang.ruby
To: "ruby-talk ML" <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
Sent: Saturday, May 13, 2006 9:12 PM
Subject: foo bar
James B. (Guest)
on 2006-05-14 07:52
(Received via mailing list)
Sergey V. wrote:
> ..
> When â??fooâ?? is used in connection with â??barâ?? it has generally
> traced to the WWII-era Army slang acronym FUBAR (â??Fucked Up Beyond All
> Repairâ?? or â??Fucked Up Beyond All Recognitionâ??), ...

On a side note, various early comicstrip characters, such as Krazy Kat,
  used "Foo!" as a general exclamation, a trait brought back by Patrick
McDonnell in his "Mutts" strip.

--
James B.

"The greatest obstacle to discovery is not ignorance, but the illusion
of knowledge."
  - D. Boorstin
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2006-05-14 19:39
(Received via mailing list)
James B. wrote:
> Sergey V. wrote:
>> ..
>> When â??fooâ?? is used in connection with â??barâ?? it has generally
>> traced to the WWII-era Army slang acronym FUBAR (â??Fucked Up Beyond
>> All Repairâ?? or â??Fucked Up Beyond All Recognitionâ??), ...
>
> On a side note, various early comicstrip characters, such as Krazy
> Kat,  used "Foo!" as a general exclamation, a trait brought back by
> Patrick McDonnell in his "Mutts" strip.
And of course Smokey Stover used "Foo!" along with the better-known
"Notary Sojac" :)

Speaking of FUBAR, SNAFU stands for "Situation Normal -- All F***** Up"

--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

http://linuxcapacityplanning.com
John G. (Guest)
on 2006-05-15 01:42
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/14/06, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>
> Speaking of FUBAR, SNAFU stands for "Situation Normal -- All F***** Up"
>

For a long time I've been using "foo", "bar", and "baz" as my big
three made-up variable names. No idea where "baz" came from though. I
think I'd heard it or seen it used somewhere, but can't recall...
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2006-05-15 06:49
(Received via mailing list)
I'm pretty sure they all originated -- in the computer science world,
that is -- at MIT in the early days of the Artificial Intelligence
program. My guess it was late 1950s or early 1960s -- somewhere around
the time Lisp 1.5 escaped from MIT.

John G. wrote:
> On 5/14/06, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>>
>> Speaking of FUBAR, SNAFU stands for "Situation Normal -- All F***** Up"
>>
>
> For a long time I've been using "foo", "bar", and "baz" as my big
> three made-up variable names. No idea where "baz" came from though. I
> think I'd heard it or seen it used somewhere, but can't recall...
>
>

--
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky

http://linuxcapacityplanning.com
Matt Long (Guest)
on 2006-05-15 08:30
(Received via mailing list)
For all kinds of fun trivia, check out the "New Hacker's Dictionary"

http://www.outpost9.com/reference/jargon/jargon_21...

Matt

On 14 May , 2006, at 10:49 PM, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky wrote:

>>>
> http://linuxcapacityplanning.com
>
>

--
Matt Long 
removed_email_address@domain.invalid /
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
University of South Florida, CRASAR
GnuPG public key: http://www.csee.usf.edu/~mtlong/public_key.html

Software is like entropy. It is difficult to grasp, weighs nothing,
and obeys the second law of thermodynamics; i.e., it always increases.

-Norman R. Augustine
Kerry B. (Guest)
on 2006-05-15 20:10
(Received via mailing list)
On 14 May 2006, at 10:42 pm, John G. wrote:

> For a long time I've been using "foo", "bar", and "baz" as my big
> three made-up variable names. No idea where "baz" came from though. I
> think I'd heard it or seen it used somewhere, but can't recall...

http://www.catb.org/~esr/jargon/html/B/baz.html implies that it's
been around since the 50s.

For some reason I always use foo, bar and wibble, but like you, I've
no idea where I picked up the third one (probably Blackadder, but
that doesn't explain why I started associating it with foo and bar).

Kerry
Bill G. (Guest)
on 2006-05-15 23:03
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/15/06, Kerry B. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> no idea where I picked up the third one (probably Blackadder, but
> that doesn't explain why I started associating it with foo and bar).

Also used foo, bar, baz.  Wibble was news to me, had never seen it
until I read the PragProg SVN book [1].  Now, it's my default project
for doing SVN experiments.

[1] http://www.pragmaticprogrammer.com/titles/svn/index.html
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