Forum: Ruby on Rails Convince me to buy TextMate!

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Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 06:22
I got a Powerbook recently and am debating buying TextMate. I installed
the trial and have checked it out, but don't see what's so great about
it. AFAICS it's the Ruby and Rails macros for expansion and other stuff
that might be it. Other than that, TextMate seems like a pretty basic
editor. I currently use PSPad and Editplus, and I could probably
get/make macros for those. Am I missing something about TextMate? I'll
buy it if somebody can convince me!

Joe
Giles B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 06:35
(Received via mailing list)
Dude, buy TextMate.








(Actually I don't even have an Apple, but from what I hear, TextMate
has like untold secrets lurking within its manual. Or something.)

On 4/16/06, Joe <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
> _______________________________________________
> Rails mailing list
> removed_email_address@domain.invalid
> http://lists.rubyonrails.org/mailman/listinfo/rails
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John H. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 06:49
(Received via mailing list)
TextMate is just a nice editor.  You can open entire directories with a
single command and have the whole project open at once(I know this is
available in other editor's but it just seems nicer in textMate), plus
you
have all of the macros.  The navigation in textMate is also very clean.
Read through the manual and just try it out, also it does not really
cost
that much so buying it is not like having to shell out the cash for
PhotoShop.

John
Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 06:57
Oh yeah, one big negative for me is that TextMate doesn't support
editing remote files (like via s/ftp). I used NetDrive on Windows. I
suspect it's possible with NFS, but I've never used that.

Joe
Scott W. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 07:04
(Received via mailing list)
I came to that very same conclusion.  I prefer to use
JEdit for pure editing or RadRails (since I use to use
Eclipse in my Java days).

scott.

--- Joe <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

> get/make macros for those. Am I missing something
> http://lists.rubyonrails.org/mailman/listinfo/rails
>


----------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
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Daniel B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 07:44
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Apr 17, 2006 at 04:57:58AM +0200, Joe wrote:
> Oh yeah, one big negative for me is that TextMate doesn't support
> editing remote files (like via s/ftp). I used NetDrive on Windows. I
> suspect it's possible with NFS, but I've never used that.

No, and I really missed that to begin with (one of my favourite features
in jEdit, for sure), but its Subversion integration is really good - not
the same thing, but it is possible to set up your projects in such a way
that it almost /feels/ the same...  I have it working well here, using
ssh tunnelling with a dedicated user on the repos box - use public key
authentication, and restrict the user on the repos server so it is only
allowed to run the svnserve command, and you're good to go.  Takes a bit
of setting up, but it's well worth the effort.

It also means you have two copies of your project - never a bad idea,
when disks are prone to badness...

I can see no reason why it shouldn't work over NFS, if you are using a
reasonably up to date version to avoid file locking wobbliness.  Or even
SMB, if that's your weakness.

<bigup target="self">Oh yeah, and you have to buy it, coz I had a patch
committed to the code base!</bigup>.  Aw, c'mon, it's a big thing for
me!  ;-)

But apart from that, it is simply the best editor I have had the joy to
discover for several years.

Dan

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Pat M. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 07:56
(Received via mailing list)
There's a plugin for Transmit which will make your big negative
disappear.
Josh S. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 07:56
Joe wrote:
> I got a Powerbook recently and am debating buying TextMate. I installed
> the trial and have checked it out, but don't see what's so great about
> it. AFAICS it's the Ruby and Rails macros for expansion and other stuff
> that might be it. Other than that, TextMate seems like a pretty basic
> editor. I currently use PSPad and Editplus, and I could probably
> get/make macros for those. Am I missing something about TextMate? I'll
> buy it if somebody can convince me!

Buy TextMate or I'll shoot this puppy!

:-P

I've been a user of BBEdit since version 1.0, and while it truly doesn't
suck, TextMate spanks it for ease of use. In terms of usability, the
only place I've seen where BBEdit wins is in find/replace when you don't
want to search *every* file in your project.

--
Josh S.
http://blog.hasmanythrough.com
Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 08:05
I read - on TextMate's web site, I'm pretty sure - that s/ftp support
will be in the next version (which is probably a paid upgrade). It also
appeared that TextMate may be merging with another editor?

Joe
Tom M. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 09:30
(Received via mailing list)
On Mon, Apr 17, 2006 at 04:57:58AM +0200, Joe wrote:

> Oh yeah, one big negative for me is that TextMate doesn't support
> editing remote files (like via s/ftp). I used NetDrive on Windows. I
> suspect it's possible with NFS, but I've never used that.

The sooner you get out of this method of working, and switch over
to version control, the sooner you get one of the biggest productivity
boosts possible to a modern programmer NOT using version control.

--
-- Tom M.
Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 09:40
Tom M. wrote:
> On Mon, Apr 17, 2006 at 04:57:58AM +0200, Joe wrote:
>
>> Oh yeah, one big negative for me is that TextMate doesn't support
>> editing remote files (like via s/ftp). I used NetDrive on Windows. I
>> suspect it's possible with NFS, but I've never used that.
>
> The sooner you get out of this method of working, and switch over
> to version control, the sooner you get one of the biggest productivity
> boosts possible to a modern programmer NOT using version control.
>

I DO use version control. On the server. I don't feel like checking out
locally, editing, committing, updating, THEN seeing if stuff works.

Joe
Tom M. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 09:45
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 16, 2006, at 10:40 PM, Joe wrote:

>> boosts possible to a modern programmer NOT using version control.
>>
>
> I DO use version control. On the server. I don't feel like checking
> out
> locally, editing, committing, updating, THEN seeing if stuff works.

Sorry for the bad assumption, I *hate* it when I do that! :-(

Set up a development environment on your local box. If it's a laptop,
it's *so* cool to be able to develop *anywhere*.

It's easy to setup a local dev environment on a Mac, particularly
with Locomotive, and Rails includes fantastic support for this with
environments.

--
-- Tom M.
Matias S. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 10:22
(Received via mailing list)
Joe wrote:

> I got a Powerbook recently and am debating buying TextMate. I installed
> the trial and have checked it out, but don't see what's so great about
> it. AFAICS it's the Ruby and Rails macros for expansion and other stuff
> that might be it. Other than that, TextMate seems like a pretty basic
> editor. I currently use PSPad and Editplus, and I could probably
> get/make macros for those. Am I missing something about TextMate? I'll
> buy it if somebody can convince me!
>
> Joe
>

I don't know if Quanta Plus runs on MacOs, but it's all I need for web
development. It's a great editor.
Alain R. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 10:31
(Received via mailing list)
Joe

Half of TextMate magic comes from its plugins/bundles.
There is one for Rails that is very promising:
    http://syncpeople.com/downloads/syncpeople_on_rails_features

It brings smarter navigation, Rails scripts easy access and, my
favourite feature, "Create Partial from Selection"

TM is also very keyboard friendly. From what I've seen, Radrails
requires a lot of mousing (but I could be wrong).

Alain
Sebastian F. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 12:42
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 16, 2006, at 11:05 PM, Joe wrote:
> It also
> appeared that TextMate may be merging with another editor?
>
> Joe

Ah yes, SubEthaMate.... This started as a silly April Fools joke on
the Textmate mailing list and it's prolly not very good for Allan if
people start spreading this around...

sebastian
Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 13:48
Sebastian F. wrote:
> On Apr 16, 2006, at 11:05 PM, Joe wrote:
>> It also
>> appeared that TextMate may be merging with another editor?
>>
>> Joe
>
> Ah yes, SubEthaMate.... This started as a silly April Fools joke on
> the Textmate mailing list and it's prolly not very good for Allan if
> people start spreading this around...
>

Ah... Here's the post:
http://lists.macromates.com/pipermail/textmate/200...

Damn, I guess that means sftp support was part of the joke?

Joe
Devin D. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 14:15
(Received via mailing list)
It doesn't support multi-byte!
Or I will buy it without any doubt.

2006/4/17, Joe <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>:
>
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
> _______________________________________________
> Rails mailing list
> removed_email_address@domain.invalid
> http://lists.rubyonrails.org/mailman/listinfo/rails
>



--
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Calle D. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 14:42
(Received via mailing list)
>>>>> "Devin" == Devin D. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> writes:

> It doesn't support multi-byte!
> Or I will buy it without any doubt.

It seems to have no problems with the Chinese(?) characters at the
bottom of your post. If it can do that _without_ handling multibyte
characters, I'd like to know how...
--
		     Calle D. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
		 http://www.livejournal.com/users/cdybedahl/
       "Facts are for people with weak opinions." -- Lars Willför, I]M
Jón B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 16:46
(Received via mailing list)
Well..

TextMate is not in any ways lightyears before any other editor. But as
a text editor it just feels nicer than most. BBEdit has great power
but you have to have an Phd in BBedit usage to be able to find it all.
The features like bookmarking folding levels are available elsewhere
but in TM it just feels natural and accessible.

And yes some of the others have snippets and macros but TextMate seems
to do it nicer. And I have not tested this much in the other editors
but the tab jumping after you inserted the snippet seems to be much
better that the others have. For example after you have inserted with
autocomplete the line <div id=""> in the beginning all of the id="" is
selected for if you need to remove it. But press tab again and the
cursor moves to inside the "". It's not an amazing feature but TM is
full of these little things that just feel natural.

So. TextMate embodies the power of Rails. Power without complexity
unless complexity is needed.


On 4/17/06, Joe <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> --
> Posted via http://www.ruby-forum.com/.
> _______________________________________________
> Rails mailing list
> removed_email_address@domain.invalid
> http://lists.rubyonrails.org/mailman/listinfo/rails
>


--
Manuel H. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 17:32
(Received via mailing list)
Hi

> It's not an amazing feature but TM is full of these little things
> that just feel natural.

I can only agree with this. TextMate does not do something
revolutionary but it does about everything you need and nothing more.
It's no bloatware but quick and has a cleaned up interface.

The highlighting is brilliant - I don't know any editors besides
TextMate, Vim and Emacs who can do nested highlighting (like Ruby
embedded in RHTML) as well as TextMate.

You can use any editor to edit text. If you are willing to pay 40
EUR, however, you get a really well honed product that does its task
really well and can be adjusted to the way you work pretty much via
macros.

Additionally, it feels like Os X more than BBEdit since it's Cocoa
and not Carbon. I just downloaded the most current demo of BBEdit
and ... well importing a project of mine took about 20 seconds (I
don't feel that time when doing that with TM) and I had to chuckle at
BBEdit's highlighting: It seems to support quite a number of
languages but it does neither support Ruby out of the box nor does it
support nested highlighting as TM does.

The author of this blog entry brings up pretty much the same points,
too: http://scottstuff.net/blog/articles/2005/09/09/far...
xemacs

Regards,

Manuel
Douglas L. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 17:44
(Received via mailing list)
2006/4/17, Joe <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>:>
> I DO use version control. On the server. I don't feel like checking out
> locally, editing, committing, updating, THEN seeing if stuff works.
>

So you don't use version control to help with multiple people working
on the same codebase? Do you all just commit together? Or is this a
sing-developer-only setup?

Douglas
James L. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 18:34
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/17/06, Joe <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> I DO use version control. On the server. I don't feel like checking out
> locally, editing, committing, updating, THEN seeing if stuff works.

You'd gain from learning about Capistrano and getting it running.

Locally:
* Check out
* Edit
* Test locally
* commit
* run "cap deploy"

done.
Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 22:23
James L. wrote:
> On 4/17/06, Joe <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>> I DO use version control. On the server. I don't feel like checking out
>> locally, editing, committing, updating, THEN seeing if stuff works.
>
> You'd gain from learning about Capistrano and getting it running.
>
> Locally:
> * Check out
> * Edit
> * Test locally
> * commit
> * run "cap deploy"
>
> done.

I'm not interested in maintaining identical installations of Postgresql,
Lighty, Mongrel, Ruby, Rails, etc. on two machines, if that's what that
entails.

Joe
Tom M. (Guest)
on 2006-04-17 23:00
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 17, 2006, at 11:23 AM, Joe wrote:

>> * Edit
> entails.
It doesn't entail that at all.

You can use any DB, including Pg, MySQL, even SQLite, and script/server
is all you need for a web server.

It's *well* worth it. Take *our* words for it. :-)

--
-- Tom M.
Hampton (Guest)
on 2006-04-21 03:42
(Received via mailing list)
I also tried TextMate... and it just didn't see what made it any
different
than JEdit. Radrails is pretty solid when you want a bigger IDE. I go
back
and forth.

I just can't stand paying for something when I can get something
extremely
similar for free.

I know, I know. But paying for a basic text editor. Something just seems
wrong about that... no matter how nifty it is. Its still used in many
programming books as "learn to program by writing..... a simple text
editor!"

/me is biased.

-hampton.
Tom M. (Guest)
on 2006-04-21 04:04
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 20, 2006, at 4:41 PM, Hampton wrote:

> I know, I know. But paying for a basic text editor.

Basic?

> Its still used in many programming books as "learn to program by
> writing..... a simple text editor!"

TextMate is decidedly not  "simple text editor".

P.S. How many man-hours have gone into emacs? If writing a
      text editor was simple, it should have been "done" a
      long time ago, right?

P.P.S. I'm cheap too. However, there are many ways to be
        cheap. I bought TextMate because it allowed me to
        make more money in less time. Being cheap with time
        is the ultimate form of cheap. :-)

--
-- Tom M.
Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-21 04:24
Hampton wrote:
> I also tried TextMate... and it just didn't see what made it any
> different
> than JEdit. Radrails is pretty solid when you want a bigger IDE. I go
> back
> and forth.
>
> I just can't stand paying for something when I can get something
> extremely
> similar for free.
>
> I know, I know. But paying for a basic text editor. Something just seems
> wrong about that... no matter how nifty it is. Its still used in many
> programming books as "learn to program by writing..... a simple text
> editor!"
>
> /me is biased.
>
> -hampton.

Wow, JEdit seems to have a lot of stuff! I'm checking it out now.

For me, an editor NEEDS s/ftp support. It appears such is planned for
RadRails 0.7, which in itself seems to be shaping up to be quite an IDE.

Using NFS with editors appears to be too painful. And at my current
location, the firewall is blocking mount.

Joe
Tom M. (Guest)
on 2006-04-21 04:34
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 20, 2006, at 5:24 PM, Joe wrote:

> For me, an editor NEEDS s/ftp support.

http://www.43folders.com/2006/03/02/transmit-remote-editing/

--
-- Tom M.
Joe (Guest)
on 2006-04-21 05:01
Tom M. wrote:
> On Apr 20, 2006, at 5:24 PM, Joe wrote:
>
>> For me, an editor NEEDS s/ftp support.
>
> http://www.43folders.com/2006/03/02/transmit-remote-editing/
>
> --
> -- Tom M.

Ah, thanks. I tried Cyberduck (free!) and it offers remote editing too.

Joe
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