Forum: Ruby Ruby Game: Nightly Travels of a Witch (Win32, OS X, Linux)

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Florian GroÃ? (Guest)
on 2006-04-05 22:05
(Received via mailing list)
Moin.

We took part in this years first 72 hour game development
competition[1]. And it was a lot of fun.

There were basically two other folks (together at the same real life
location) and me, working together with them remotely. We could have
done way more in the three days, but felt like having regular sleep and
all that... ;)

We used Ruby, of course, as well as the Ruby/Gosu[2] game development
library that lets you do hardware accelerated graphics, sounds, input
and so on pretty easily.

We did pretty well on ranking even though the initial release was a
horribly mess. (There was crash bugs, you started on level 5 instead of
1 and so on...)

I've done some minimal post-competition polishing and the results are
now available. Comments from the Ruby community are very welcome and I'd
definitely suggest doing this kind of multi-day code rush to anyone.
It's a fun and educating experience.

Screenshot: http://flgr.0x42.net/gdc72h-05/final.jpg

Win32 binaries: http://flgr.0x42.net/gdc72h-05/postfinal.win.zip
Unpack, run game.exe.

OS X binaries: http://flgr.0x42.net/gdc72h-05/postfinal.mac.zip
Unpack, copy the included Gosu.framework into the /Library/Frameworks
folder, run Game.app.

Linux: http://flgr.0x42.net/gdc72h-05/postfinal.src.tgz
Get Ruby-Gosu working (see instructions on Gosu's homepage, there's
quite a few dependencies and you need working 3D graphics), unpack, use
ruby to run Main.rb.

If you have any trouble getting this to work please don't hesitate to
post here. I'll try to help.

[1]: http://www.pixel-arts.org/72/
[2]: http://www.raschke.de/julian/gosu/
James G. (Guest)
on 2006-04-05 22:42
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 5, 2006, at 1:04 PM, Florian Groß wrote:

> Moin.
>
> We took part in this years first 72 hour game development
> competition[1]. And it was a lot of fun.

Florian this is terrific.  I'm only slightly embarrassed to admit
that I had to restart level 6 twice.  :(

> I'd definitely suggest doing this kind of multi-day code rush to
> anyone. It's a fun and educating experience.

I so agree.  The big contest I do each year is inn July this time
around:

http://icfpcontest.org/

> OS X binaries: http://flgr.0x42.net/gdc72h-05/postfinal.mac.zip
> Unpack, copy the included Gosu.framework into the /Library/
> Frameworks folder, run Game.app.

Awesome.  I have been anxiously awaiting this frameworks arrival on
Mac OS X.  It's great to see it is now here!

James Edward G. II
Gregory B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-05 22:51
(Received via mailing list)
On 4/5/06, Florian Groß <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> We used Ruby, of course, as well as the Ruby/Gosu[2] game development
> library that lets you do hardware accelerated graphics, sounds, input
> and so on pretty easily.

Awesome.  I am excited to see this neat game pop up and it'll help as
an example of how to use Gosu.  Very cool!
Logan C. (Guest)
on 2006-04-05 23:10
(Received via mailing list)
On Apr 5, 2006, at 2:04 PM, Florian GroÃ? wrote:

> OS X binaries: http://flgr.0x42.net/gdc72h-05/postfinal.mac.zip
> Unpack, copy the included Gosu.framework into the /Library/
> Frameworks folder, run Game.app.

Just like to point out that it also works if you stick Gosu.framework
in ~/Library/Frameworks/
Benjohn B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-06 02:14
(Received via mailing list)
This library looks splendid! Is there support for vector type drawing
too, or is it sprites only?

Cheers,
	Benjohn
Benjohn B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-06 02:20
(Received via mailing list)
On 5 Apr 2006, at 23:11, I wrote:

> This library looks splendid! Is there support for vector type
> drawing too, or is it sprites only?

Looks to be sprites only, but still looks splendid.
James B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-06 03:30
(Received via mailing list)
Florian Groß wrote:
> Moin.

I think I understand what this word means, but not how to pronounce it.

Can someone clue in a native speaker of English (well, the NYC variant)
who has a faint knowledge of German?

(Not that the word "moin" itself is German, but if you can tell me that
it sounds like some common German word, or an American-English word,
that would help.)


Thanks!
Florian GroÃ? (Guest)
on 2006-04-06 04:21
(Received via mailing list)
James B. wrote:

>
>
> Thanks!

It's the number 9 (Neun), but with "M" instead of "N" at the beginning.
I think "loin" and "coin" in English are pronounced that way as well.

For a nice and detailed explanation of the meaning please see
http://moinmoin.wikiwikiweb.de/MoinMoinEtymology/
James B. (Guest)
on 2006-04-06 05:12
(Received via mailing list)
Florian Groß wrote:

>
> It's the number 9 (Neun), but with "M" instead of "N" at the beginning.
> I think "loin" and "coin" in English are pronounced that way as well.
>
> For a nice and detailed explanation of the meaning please see
> http://moinmoin.wikiwikiweb.de/MoinMoinEtymology/
>


Thanks!

James
Damphyr (Guest)
on 2006-04-06 13:53
(Received via mailing list)
James B. wrote:
> Florian Groß wrote:
>
>>
>> It's the number 9 (Neun), but with "M" instead of "N" at the
>> beginning. I think "loin" and "coin" in English are pronounced that
>> way as well.
>>
>> For a nice and detailed explanation of the meaning please see
>> http://moinmoin.wikiwikiweb.de/MoinMoinEtymology/
>>
Usually you double it: moin, moin.
Walking into the Frankfurt office on a
sunny day is like meeting a pack of those seagulls from Finding Nemo :)
V.-


--
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