Forum: Ruby on Rails SQLite in small production environment

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Nithin R. (Guest)
on 2006-03-01 02:42
(Received via mailing list)
I apologize if this has been asked before, but couldn't search the
forum-mailing-list bridge. It seems the search feature is currently
disabled.

I wanted to know if SQLite will work for my company in a production
environment.

My company's current website gets about 15,000 hits/month. The most
hits it ever got in a day was about 1,500.

I will be deploying my application on a shared server. The database
shouldn't be very large: it's holding about a 1,000 records.

I've read this page: http://www.sqlite.org/whentouse.html and it seems
like I should be fine, but wanted a 2nd opinion.

TIA
- Nithin
Matthew P. (Guest)
on 2006-03-01 08:49
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Feb 28, 2006 at 04:41:54PM -0800, Nithin R. wrote:
> I wanted to know if SQLite will work for my company in a production
> environment.
>
> My company's current website gets about 15,000 hits/month. The most
> hits it ever got in a day was about 1,500.
>
> I will be deploying my application on a shared server. The database
> shouldn't be very large: it's holding about a 1,000 records.

The size of the database and it's hit rate isn't as important as the
write
rate -- how often is this database going to be updated?  SQLite's write
performance, especially with concurrent access, is fairly poor --
understandabe, considering the architecture.  If you're mostly doing
reads,
though, SQLite will happily serve that sort of load without a hassle.

- Matt
Nithin R. (Guest)
on 2006-03-01 21:20
(Received via mailing list)
> The size of the database and it's hit rate isn't as important as the write
> rate -- how often is this database going to be updated?  SQLite's write
> performance, especially with concurrent access, is fairly poor --
> understandabe, considering the architecture.  If you're mostly doing reads,
> though, SQLite will happily serve that sort of load without a hassle.

The write rate will be very small. Only when products and
announcements are updated, or when distributors update their contact
information will there be a need to write to the database.

- Nithin
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