Forum: Ruby macworld

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Mike S. (Guest)
on 2006-01-01 14:58
(Received via mailing list)
What Ruby stuff will be happening at Macworld?  What software is
written in Ruby, which companies are Ruby shops, will there be any
Ruby events to clear up any confusion from Rails-hype, etc?

We could likely avoid a lot of duplicitous advocacy if some people
would compile some unbiased "Why Ruby?" facts, examples, and idioms
into a Keynote presentation and export that as a quicktime file.
Then we could serve that file and point browsers to it when people
ask about Ruby.  Packing that page with links to other Ruby resources
would be a convenient tool to grow the community (bookmark it for
them, then click the quicktime link and walk to the next exhibit ha ha).

Since the target audience will have advanced skills, I think
intricate examples showcasing gems, rake, C, and a lot of other foss
packages should be the goal.  Make slides introducing your own
libraries and contribute them.

I've made a wiki page to collect notes on what should be included.  I
could do the Keynote work, but I'd rather leave it to someone who's a
guru and already has some advocacy files prepared.
http://www.rubygarden.org/ruby?WhyRubyPresentation

Call me ambitious and optimistic, but I think the responsible
estimate is that Ruby popularity will explode this year.  I think
it's a smart move to spend some time on this now to ensure a great
and agile transition for millions of future Rubyists.  Macworld will
be a good chance to further the entrenchment of two of the greatest
problem-solving tools (Ruby and Apple) by making them more familiar
with each other.

-Mike
Hampton (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 18:15
(Received via mailing list)
I just bought a new Mac, and its the worst dev environment for ruby
possible. I've put at least 5 hours (yes, *5*) into getting the
ruby-mysql bindings working. And *nothing* gets it working. In fact,
the one mention of my error on the web says, "No known fix." That's
nice to hear after spending all this money! Errrrgh.

I might put linux on this box.
Linux is a great ruby environment.

-hampton.
James G. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 18:15
(Received via mailing list)
On Jan 2, 2006, at 9:47 AM, Hampton wrote:

> I just bought a new Mac, and its the worst dev environment for ruby
> possible.

I've used a Mac for Ruby development since day one and I couldn't
disagree more.

I also use MySQL with no trouble so I encourage you to start a new
thread about your problems and let us help you get it running...

James Edward G. II
Mike S. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 18:46
(Received via mailing list)
On 2-Jan-06, at 10:47 AM, Hampton wrote:

> I just bought a new Mac, and its the worst dev environment for ruby
> possible. I've put at least 5 hours (yes, *5*) into getting the
> ruby-mysql bindings working. And *nothing* gets it working. In fact,
> the one mention of my error on the web says, "No known fix." That's
> nice to hear after spending all this money! Errrrgh.
>
> I might put linux on this box.
> Linux is a great ruby environment.
>
> -hampton.

What are your specific problems?

I got a Mac to broaden my horizons, and after some initial
frustration ended up with a great environment.

Apple's ruby installation is a little messed up, but I ended up
replacing the system readline library and building my own ruby.

There are various recipes you can find with google, as a lot of
people trying Rails wanted to develop on OS X e.g.

http://weblog.rubyonrails.com/archives/2005/04/30/...
tiger/
http://tech.rufy.com/articles/2005/05/01/complete-...
os-x-10-4-tiger

These days I'm happily tooling around with Ruby, Textmate,
Subversion, MySQL and a bundle of other goodies...

Hope this helps,

Michael

--

Mike S. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
http://www.stok.co.uk/~mike/

The "`Stok' disclaimers" apply.
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 22:00
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Jan 03, 2006 at 12:52:59AM +0900, James Edward G. II wrote:
> On Jan 2, 2006, at 9:47 AM, Hampton wrote:
>
> >I just bought a new Mac, and its the worst dev environment for ruby
> >possible.
>
> I've used a Mac for Ruby development since day one and I couldn't
> disagree more.
>
> I also use MySQL with no trouble so I encourage you to start a new
> thread about your problems and let us help you get it running...

I seem to recall reading somewhere that MacOS X has some nonstandard
screwed-up installation defaults for MySQL that need to be "fixed".  Is
there truth in that?  Might that be Hampton's issue?

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

This sig for rent:  a Signify v1.14 production from
http://www.debian.org/
James G. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 22:06
(Received via mailing list)
On Jan 2, 2006, at 1:57 PM, Chad P. wrote:

> I seem to recall reading somewhere that MacOS X has some nonstandard
> screwed-up installation defaults for MySQL that need to be
> "fixed".  Is
> there truth in that?

Not that I'm aware of.

You might be thinking of the fact that Apple's install of Ruby has a
few issues.  Those are easily fixed though.

James Edward G. II
Devin M. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 22:28
(Received via mailing list)
Hampton wrote:

>I just bought a new Mac, and its the worst dev environment for ruby
>possible. I've put at least 5 hours (yes, *5*) into getting the
>ruby-mysql bindings working. And *nothing* gets it working. In fact,
>the one mention of my error on the web says, "No known fix." That's
>nice to hear after spending all this money! Errrrgh.
>
>
Use DarwinPorts or Fink.

Devin
Jim F. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 22:40
(Received via mailing list)
On 1/2/06, Devin M. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>
> Hampton wrote:
>
> Use DarwinPorts or Fink.



For MySQL, I used the dmg. That was easy and it even gives you a control
panel to shutdown and restart the server.

For Ruby, just build your own. That is simplest. Also, I built my own
readline - that too was simple.
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 22:46
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Jan 03, 2006 at 05:03:49AM +0900, James Edward G. II wrote:
> few issues.  Those are easily fixed though.
Okay, thanks for the clarification.

I keep flirting with the idea of getting a Mac in here, but keep
discarding it with the realization that A) I probably wouldn't use it
much and B) I still don't like one-button mice (which would be something
of a problem since I'd probably want to get a laptop).

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);
Mike S. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 22:55
(Received via mailing list)
On 2-Jan-06, at 3:45 PM, Chad P. wrote:

> I keep flirting with the idea of getting a Mac in here, but keep
> discarding it with the realization that A) I probably wouldn't use it
> much and B) I still don't like one-button mice (which would be
> something
> of a problem since I'd probably want to get a laptop).

I replaced my linux desktop with a 17" PowerBook, and it quite
happily uses my 3 button Logitech mouse (well, two with a clickable
scroll-wheel).  The only thing that still gets me is my expectation
of X Window style cut & paste.

Mike

--

Mike S. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
http://www.stok.co.uk/~mike/

The "`Stok' disclaimers" apply.
J. Ryan S. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 23:04
(Received via mailing list)
On Jan 2, 2006, at 3:45 PM, Chad P. wrote:

> B) I still don't like one-button mice (which would be something
> of a problem since I'd probably want to get a laptop).

Let me avoid the flame war about to ensue by quickly post this:

http://arstechnica.com/news.ars/post/20050802-5158.html

~ ryan ~

PS - YES, I know Apple's laptops have a one-button mouse built in still.
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 23:08
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Jan 03, 2006 at 05:53:56AM +0900, Mike S. wrote:
>
> I replaced my linux desktop with a 17" PowerBook, and it quite
> happily uses my 3 button Logitech mouse (well, two with a clickable
> scroll-wheel).

I'm perfectly aware of the capability of Macs to interface with an
external mouse with more than one button.  It's the built-in pointing
device with only one button on the Apple laptops that drives me up the
wall.  You can't just plug in an integrated trackpad with more than one
button.

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
Devin M. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 23:17
(Received via mailing list)
Jim F. wrote:

>For MySQL, I used the dmg. That was easy and it even gives you a control
>panel to shutdown and restart the server.
>
>
To be fair, I used the dmg for MySQL. I tried DarwinPorts, but could not
get mysql_install to run (or whatever it's called -- I forget).

For ruby and rubygems, I used DarwinPorts. (Also for graphicsmagick.)

For everything else, I used rubygems.

Devin
YMMV.
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 23:17
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Jan 03, 2006 at 06:01:53AM +0900, J. Ryan S. wrote:
>
> PS - YES, I know Apple's laptops have a one-button mouse built in still.

My favorite line from the article:

"Now, about the trackpad buttons on your laptops..."

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
Ilmari H. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 23:33
(Received via mailing list)
On 1/2/06, Chad P. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> button.
>

You can emulate the second button and the third button by pressing
down the sightseeing key and the switch key, respectively. Not that
it's a terribly good solution.
Rich M. (Guest)
on 2006-01-02 23:42
(Received via mailing list)
At 5:53 AM +0900 1/3/06, Mike S. wrote:
> I replaced my linux desktop with a 17" PowerBook, and it quite
> happily uses my 3 button Logitech mouse (well, two with a clickable
> scroll-wheel).  The only thing that still gets me is my expectation
> of X Window style cut & paste.

The support software for the Kensington mice and trackballs supports
application-specific settings for all of the buttons.  I used this to
allow me to have copy and paste buttons that functioned across the
X11/OSX divide.

-r
--
Technical editing and writing, programming, and web development:
  http://www.cfcl.com/rdm/resume.html

Contact information: removed_email_address@domain.invalid, +1 650-873-7841
unknown (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 00:39
(Received via mailing list)
Jim F. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

> For Ruby, just build your own. That is simplest.

it is true that's the simplest way to install ruby from sources. However
if you need to bind ruby to gnome, glade and/or gtk+2 here the prob
comes...

in such a case (needs of gtk+ or gnome) it's better to use darwinports.

i got three ruby on my box :
the default from Apple;
the latest 1.8.4 installed from tar.gz
the one from dp 1.8.3
....

i've instaklles MySQL from mysql site download, works out of the box
with ruby og too...
Luc H. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 01:10
(Received via mailing list)
On 2 janv. 06, at 23:37, Une bévue wrote:

> the one from dp 1.8.3

Uh ?!?? As far as I know, DarwinPorts is still at 1.8.2.
Kevin B. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 01:34
(Received via mailing list)
On Monday 02 January 2006 14:45, Chad P. wrote:
> > few issues.  Those are easily fixed though.
>
> Okay, thanks for the clarification.
>
> I keep flirting with the idea of getting a Mac in here, but keep
> discarding it with the realization that A) I probably wouldn't use it
> much and B) I still don't like one-button mice (which would be something
> of a problem since I'd probably want to get a laptop).

They give you a mighty mouse now anyway, so A is your only problem.
Sean W. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 01:40
(Received via mailing list)
On 2006-01-02 16:33:32 -0600, removed_email_address@domain.invalid (Une bévue) 
said:
> Jim F. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>> For Ruby, just build your own. That is simplest.
> it is true that's the simplest way to install ruby from sources.

I have to agree here. On my OSX workstation I've built readline and
ruby from source. I've also done it on my Intel preview box as well. On
my OSX server, I just used the ruby fix script. On my OSX workstations
I build MySQL from scratch. On OSX server, I used the OSX installer
they have for MySQL.

I've gotten the MySQL gem to work by pointing the gem install to the
mysql_config file:

sudo gem install mysql -- --with-mysql-config=/usr/bin/mysql_config

(find your mysql_config by calling which mysql_config)

Also, a lot of articles say to use gcc_select 3.3. I find this to be
not true. I have more diffulties building the Mysql stuff under GCC 3.3
on OSX.


> However
> if you need to bind ruby to gnome, glade and/or gtk+2 here the prob
> comes...

This is so true. Building glib is hairy all in and of itself.

>
> in such a case (needs of gtk+ or gnome) it's better to use darwinports.

I've had terrible luck with any DarwinPorts package. Also a lot of the
ports are out of date.

Sean
unknown (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 02:10
(Received via mailing list)
Luc H. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

> Uh ?!?? As far as I know, DarwinPorts is still at 1.8.2.

you'r right :
~%> /opt/local/bin/ruby --version
ruby 1.8.2 (2004-12-25) [powerpc-darwin8.3.0]
~%> /usr/local/bin/ruby --version
ruby 1.8.4 (2005-12-24) [powerpc-darwin8.3.0]
~%> /usr/bin/ruby --version
ruby 1.8.2 (2004-12-25) [powerpc-darwin8.0]
~%>

i thought it was in between apple's and latest...
unknown (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 02:10
(Received via mailing list)
Sean W. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

>
> I've had terrible luck with any DarwinPorts package. Also a lot of the
> ports are out of date.

i did install anjuta one week before and today where i was unlucky ))
Error 2 @ make...
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 09:04
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Jan 03, 2006 at 08:32:51AM +0900, Kevin B. wrote:
> On Monday 02 January 2006 14:45, Chad P. wrote:
> >
> > I keep flirting with the idea of getting a Mac in here, but keep
> > discarding it with the realization that A) I probably wouldn't use it
> > much and B) I still don't like one-button mice (which would be something
> > of a problem since I'd probably want to get a laptop).
>
> They give you a mighty mouse now anyway, so A is your only problem.

I direct your attention again to my reference to laptops.

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

This sig for rent:  a Signify v1.14 production from
http://www.debian.org/
Devin M. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 09:31
(Received via mailing list)
While we're hijacking this thread for our own purposes, I have a couple
of requests for OS X software that might exist, but I can't find:

- I'd like to press a crazy, unused modifier combo (say, Shift-Alt) and
have click-and-drag move the entire window that I'm
clicking-and-dragging on. I'm tired of slogging all the way to the top
of the window just to move it.
- I generally have gem_server, plus one or two rails servers of my own
running, and because I like to be able to a)flip to the logs quickly,
and b)start/stop the servers in very few keypresses, I generally keep
'em each open in their own Terminal window. That creates clutter
quickly. Now, I might investigate 1)screen, 2)iTerm, 3)creating my own
start/stop daemonizer bash script for the purpose, but what I'd really
like is a stupid little Cocoa app that I could wire up to random shell
scripts, and that gave me a bunch of Start/Stop and View Log buttons,
akin to the System Controls thing that the MySQL dmg gives me.
Basically, Locomotive, but without using Locomotive. :)

Sorry about that...
Carl W. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 11:33
(Received via mailing list)
Hi Hampton,

I hope I'm not repeating what anyone else is said but you can get
mysql bindings to work by:


Compiling and installing ruby, gems, etc and setting up mysql based on
the guide below:
http://hivelogic.com/articles/2005/12/01/ruby_rail...

At the bottom of the mysql section it has:
sudo gem install mysql -- --with-mysql-dir=/usr/local/mysql

Do this and then go read through this url:
file:///usr/local/lib/ruby/gems/1.8/gems/mysql-2.7/README.html

Which basically says go to the mysql gems directory (from above) and
do the following:
- ruby extconf.rb --with-mysql-dir=/usr/local/mysql
- make
- su
- ruby ./test.rb [hostname [user [passwd [dbname [port [socket
[flag]]]]]]]
I got one error from this test, on the test_fetch_double test but the
result seems fine.
- make install

After you do this  you can run ruby mysql fine. A sample bit of code is
below:

require 'mysql'

m = Mysql.new("localhost", "root", "")
m.select_db("dbname")

result = m.query("select * from table")

result.each do |row|
  row.each do |val|
    puts val
  end
end


As an aside, I bought a mac a few days ago and love it. I bought the
17". I've written a blog:
http://carlwoodward.blogspot.com/

Hope this helps and you stick with your mac.

Cheers,
Carl.
Kevin B. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 21:21
(Received via mailing list)
On Tuesday 03 January 2006 01:03, Chad P. wrote:
> On Tue, Jan 03, 2006 at 08:32:51AM +0900, Kevin B. wrote:
> > On Monday 02 January 2006 14:45, Chad P. wrote:
> > > I keep flirting with the idea of getting a Mac in here, but keep
> > > discarding it with the realization that A) I probably wouldn't use it
> > > much and B) I still don't like one-button mice (which would be
> > > something of a problem since I'd probably want to get a laptop).
> >
> > They give you a mighty mouse now anyway, so A is your only problem.
>
> I direct your attention again to my reference to laptops.

I direct your attention again to plugging in any usb mouse.  I'm sorry,
but I
simply cannot allow you to write off Macs entirely because there's one
button
on the track pad.  If you gave it a chance, you wouldn't have that much
of a
problem with it.  Really.
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-03 21:51
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, Jan 04, 2006 at 04:19:54AM +0900, Kevin B. wrote:
> > I direct your attention again to my reference to laptops.
>
> I direct your attention again to plugging in any usb mouse.  I'm sorry, but I
> simply cannot allow you to write off Macs entirely because there's one button
> on the track pad.  If you gave it a chance, you wouldn't have that much of a
> problem with it.  Really.
>

Just accept that I require an integrated interface with which I'm
comfortable, and leave it at that.  I don't want to get into a flame war
about whether or not it's acceptable to have to use an external pointing
device on a compact, portable device in order to not be driven up the
friggin' wall by the interface.

Thanks.

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

"A script is what you give the actors.  A program
is what you give the audience." - Larry Wall
Kashia B. (Guest)
on 2006-01-04 00:15
(Received via mailing list)
Hi,

> Just accept that I require an integrated interface with which I'm
> comfortable, and leave it at that.  I don't want to get into a flame war
> about whether or not it's acceptable to have to use an external pointing
> device on a compact, portable device in order to not be driven up the
> friggin' wall by the interface.

You might want to keep one thing in mind: the Apple Interface is built
to
be used with a single mouse button, it will certainly not drive you up a
wall, simply because of that fact. I found the lack of the second mouse
button weird at first, simply because I was using it the whole time in
window/linux, but I became used to it pretty fast, meaning a weeks or
so.
Generally I don't propose Macs as I think most people just can't "cut
back" something at first, just to discover that it's just "the right
way"
on this platform.

Kash
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-04 02:31
(Received via mailing list)
On Wed, Jan 04, 2006 at 07:13:00AM +0900, Kashia B. wrote:
> wall, simply because of that fact. I found the lack of the second mouse
> button weird at first, simply because I was using it the whole time in
> window/linux, but I became used to it pretty fast, meaning a weeks or so.
> Generally I don't propose Macs as I think most people just can't "cut
> back" something at first, just to discover that it's just "the right way"
> on this platform.

I've used Macs.  I didn't like the one-button mouse.

I tend to dislike pointing devices because of the disconnect in
disparate parts of the interface (keyboard and mouse), but I use them
because they're useful with certain types of programs.  A web browser
just isn't as efficient tool without one, for instance.

Giving a mouse only one button just exacerbates my annoyance, because it
forces more interface-switching than I would otherwise deal with, and
because the versatility of the pointing device itself is reduced.

Now that I've told the equivalent of my life story with regards to this
story, I'm going to attempt to drop the subject on the "agree to
disagree" note I already indicated (see above), and hope I'll stop
getting messages from Mac evangelists who think the one-button mouse is
a feature rather than a bug.  Maybe you like it: I don't.

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

unix virus: If you're using a unixlike OS, please forward
this to 20 others and erase your system partition.
Shot - Piotr S. (Guest)
on 2006-01-05 18:44
(Received via mailing list)
Hello.

Chad P.:

> I tend to dislike pointing devices because of the disconnect in
> disparate parts of the interface (keyboard and mouse), but I use
> them because they're useful with certain types of programs.  A web
> browser just isn't as efficient tool without one, for instance.

Have you tried a ThinkPad laptop with a TrackPoint device (the red
nipple between G, H and B keys)? In the past two-and-a-half years,
I used an external mouse only once with my R31 (which I use 12+ hours
a day), and find myself reaching for the nipple every time I sit at
a desktop. For me, it's simply unbeatable (although it took me about
a week to get used to it).

You only can't bring yourself to buying an Apple
laptop; I couldn't buy a non-ThinkPad one... :o)

Cheers,
-- Shot
Chad P. (Guest)
on 2006-01-05 18:44
(Received via mailing list)
On Fri, Jan 06, 2006 at 12:48:49AM +0900, Shot - Piotr S. wrote:
> nipple between G, H and B keys)? In the past two-and-a-half years,
> I used an external mouse only once with my R31 (which I use 12+ hours
> a day), and find myself reaching for the nipple every time I sit at
> a desktop. For me, it's simply unbeatable (although it took me about
> a week to get used to it).

Actually, I'm using one right now.  I love Thinkpads.  Once I turn the
trackpad off in the BIOS settings, so that I can just stick to the
trackpoint (and, when at home, an external trackball), I'm pleased as
punch.  I love the button placement for the integrated pointing devices,
too.


>
> You only can't bring yourself to buying an Apple
> laptop; I couldn't buy a non-ThinkPad one... :o)

Every time I try a different laptop, I find myself wishing I was using a
Thinkpad.  I'd be willing to make an exception for an Apple laptop from
time to time, though, if the physical interface was better (for me).

--
Chad P. [ CCD CopyWrite | http://ccd.apotheon.org ]

print substr("Just another Perl hacker", 0, -2);
Payton S. (Guest)
on 2006-01-05 23:30
(Received via mailing list)
Just my 2c:
These little utils enable trackpad right-clicking (and scrolling, and
more) on Mac laptops.  They both work wonderfully:

http://www.ragingmenace.com/software/sidetrack/
http://www-users.kawo2.rwth-aachen.de/~razzfazz/iscroll2/

-Payton
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