Forum: Ruby on Rails RE: newbie - Apache problem two apps

Announcement (2017-05-07): www.ruby-forum.com is now read-only since I unfortunately do not have the time to support and maintain the forum any more. Please see rubyonrails.org/community and ruby-lang.org/en/community for other Rails- und Ruby-related community platforms.
HOGANBP (Guest)
on 2005-12-01 23:15
(Received via mailing list)
Heheheheh that can be a HUGE pain in the butt and it depends largely on
what OS you're using.  Most folks don't do it that way... They prefer to
use vhosts.

http://wiki.rubyonrails.com/rails/pages/HowtoDeplo...
OneMachine

Take a look around the wiki... A lot of these questions are answered
there.
Frank R. (Guest)
on 2005-12-01 23:43
(Received via mailing list)
This seems to be a big pain as compared to php or jsp.
I can just place the app folder in the directory and call it.

I check ed on your link, but I do not understand how to get this
working.
Is Apache the only way on Windows?



Regards,

Frank R.
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
brianvh (Guest)
on 2005-12-02 00:03
(Received via mailing list)
Frank R. wrote:
> This seems to be a big pain as compared to php or jsp.
> I can just place the app folder in the directory and call it.


True, but PHP and JSP is all about serving souped-up web pages. Rails is
about
building web-based applications, and things can be very different when
you cross
over that line (no matter how blurry PHP and JSP like to make it ;).

-Brian
Bruce B. (Guest)
on 2005-12-02 03:18
(Received via mailing list)
I was reading the documentation about ActiveRecord and this line
caught my eye

...which again gives Product#name and Product#name=(new_name)


Why is it that sometimes a dot notation is used and sometimes the #?

The same thing is true in css where they use

.blue for a class

and

#blue for an id.

Your help will help me digest my dinner.

bruce
sitharus-rails (Guest)
on 2005-12-02 03:26
(Received via mailing list)
On 2/12/2005, at 2:16 PM, Bruce B. wrote:

> I was reading the documentation about ActiveRecord and this line
> caught my eye
>
> ...which again gives Product#name and Product#name=(new_name)
>
> Why is it that sometimes a dot notation is used and sometimes the #?

By convention # indicates an instance method and . indicates a class
method, for example. Product.find(:all) indicates that this is valid
code, whereas Product#name shows that  you'll need to create a
Product instance first.

That's what I remember from the Pickaxe anyway.
--
Phillip H.
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
Bruce B. (Guest)
on 2005-12-02 04:55
(Received via mailing list)
Thanks Phillip.  My dinner is duly digested.  Perhaps I should pick
up this pickaxe book.  Is it the free download off the web or is this
something else. I bought Agile web development.  Happy to buy this if
it will save you answering hundreds of questions from me.

bruce
sitharus-rails (Guest)
on 2005-12-02 04:59
(Received via mailing list)
On 2/12/2005, at 3:51 PM, Bruce B. wrote:

> Thanks Phillip.  My dinner is duly digested.  Perhaps I should pick
> up this pickaxe book.  Is it the free download off the web or is
> this something else. I bought Agile web development.  Happy to buy
> this if it will save you answering hundreds of questions from me.

You can get the Ruby 1.6 version from http://www.rubycentral.com/
book/ or pick up the latest from http://pragmaticprogrammer.com/
titles/ruby/index.html. I would definitely recommend it, it explains
some of the weirder constructs you see and why they work, they make a
lot more sense after that.

--
Phillip H.
removed_email_address@domain.invalid
This topic is locked and can not be replied to.