Forum: NGINX trying to set timer_resolution - but... 'unknown directive "timer_resolution"'

Announcement (2017-05-07): www.ruby-forum.com is now read-only since I unfortunately do not have the time to support and maintain the forum any more. Please see rubyonrails.org/community and ruby-lang.org/en/community for other Rails- und Ruby-related community platforms.
Jeffrey L. (Guest)
on 2009-04-28 08:50
(Received via mailing list)
as per subject, I'm trying to set timer_resolution in my nginx.conf
file - but to no avail. When i do an "nginx -t", I get the "unknown
directive" error message - despite the fact that this should be a
known directive (see
http://wiki.nginx.org/NginxHttpMainModule#timer_resolution)

So my 2 questions:
- what's wrong? I have my 'timer_resolution' in http { }. I believe
this is correct. Looking at the source, this should be correct too
(it's an "nginx core command"). I've also tried (just in case) setting
'timer_resolution' to '10', instead of '10ms', but to no avail
- the default value is 0 (wiki needs to be corrected) as per source.
What does that mean?

This is with the latest stable, nginx 0.6.36.

-jf

--
In the meantime, here is your PSA:
"It's so hard to write a graphics driver that open-sourcing it would not
help."
    -- Andrew Fear, Software Product Manager, NVIDIA Corporation
http://kerneltrap.org/node/7228
Igor S. (Guest)
on 2009-04-28 09:05
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Apr 28, 2009 at 12:42:41PM +0800, Jeffrey 'jf' Lim wrote:

> as per subject, I'm trying to set timer_resolution in my nginx.conf
> file - but to no avail. When i do an "nginx -t", I get the "unknown
> directive" error message - despite the fact that this should be a
> known directive (see
> http://wiki.nginx.org/NginxHttpMainModule#timer_resolution)
>
> So my 2 questions:
> - what's wrong? I have my 'timer_resolution' in http { }. I believe
> this is correct. Looking at the source, this should be correct too
> (it's an "nginx core command"). I've also tried (just in case) setting

As it core command it should be set on global level:

timer_resolution  100ms;

http {
   ...

> 'timer_resolution' to '10', instead of '10ms', but to no avail
> - the default value is 0 (wiki needs to be corrected) as per source.
> What does that mean?

0 means that timer_resolution is not ised. 10 means 10 seconds.
Jeffrey L. (Guest)
on 2009-04-28 09:13
(Received via mailing list)
2009/4/28 Igor S. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>:
>
> http {
>   ...
>

arrh, got it! thanks :) <slaps head>


>> 'timer_resolution' to '10', instead of '10ms', but to no avail
>> - the default value is 0 (wiki needs to be corrected) as per source.
>> What does that mean?
>
> 0 means that timer_resolution is not ised.

sorry? you mean "used"? so '0' means that this should be the ideal? (i
want timer_resolution to be generally as accurate as possible).


> 10 means 10 seconds.
>

got it, thanks.

-jf

--
In the meantime, here is your PSA:
"It's so hard to write a graphics driver that open-sourcing it would not
help."
    -- Andrew Fear, Software Product Manager, NVIDIA Corporation
http://kerneltrap.org/node/7228
Igor S. (Guest)
on 2009-04-28 09:25
(Received via mailing list)
On Tue, Apr 28, 2009 at 01:02:50PM +0800, Jeffrey 'jf' Lim wrote:

> > timer_resolution š100ms;
> >> What does that mean?
> >
> > 0 means that timer_resolution is not ised.
>
> sorry? you mean "used"?

Yes, "used".

> so '0' means that this should be the ideal? (i
> want timer_resolution to be generally as accurate as possible).

Yes, by default timer_resolution is not used.
This topic is locked and can not be replied to.