Forum: Ruby perl6 logo

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Greg D. (Guest)
on 2009-03-24 20:21
(Received via mailing list)
I thought some of you might find this humorous.

This is my entry into the Perl6 logo contest:

http://static.destiney.com/perl6_logo.png
Robert K. (Guest)
on 2009-03-24 20:56
(Received via mailing list)
On 24.03.2009 19:17, Greg D. wrote:
> I thought some of you might find this humorous.
>
> This is my entry into the Perl6 logo contest:
>
> http://static.destiney.com/perl6_logo.png

A language needs only a logo if it really exists.  I had thought perl6
was only a myth.

;-)

  robert
Thomas S. (Guest)
on 2009-03-24 20:58
(Received via mailing list)
On Mar 24, 2:17 pm, Greg D. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> I thought some of you might find this humorous.
>
> This is my entry into the Perl6 logo contest:
>
> http://static.destiney.com/perl6_logo.png

Many a good snicker, thanks.

T.
David M. (Guest)
on 2009-03-25 20:20
(Received via mailing list)
Humorous, sure.

Of course, there is one thing even Perl5 does that Ruby doesn't -- it
seems to be much more capable of arbitrary syntax manipulation:

http://search.cpan.org/~smueller/Filter-Simple-0.8...
http://search.cpan.org/dist/Acme-Lingua-Pirate-Per...

Whether this is a good thing or not is open to debate. Ruby DSLs, as
flexible as they are, still pretty much look like Ruby. That's a
valuable asset -- it means once I have a good understanding of how Ruby
syntax works, a DSL isn't likely to completely surprise me, whereas with
Perl, my source could be run through an arbitrary regular expression.

But it is a limitation, and to duplicate it in Ruby requires games like
eval(some_filter(File.read('foo.rb')))
Louis-Philippe (Guest)
on 2009-03-25 21:26
(Received via mailing list)
i don't think Perl6 needs any protection,
as much as Ruby doesn't also need any.
Different languages, different communities, different perspectives...

Few things to note in its favor though:
-the redesign is highly influenced by Ruby
-it already has more than one implementations
-one of its implementation, the Pugs, has a great deal more thoughts
about
threading than both Ruby and Python
-one other implementation, Rakudo, is part of an initial push on the
rosetta
stone multi-language Parrot VM, which if it turns right could also have
a
lot of implication for Rubyists.

I find language war is no fun game at all,
collaboration always wins in the end

L-P

2009/3/25 David M. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
David M. (Guest)
on 2009-03-25 21:54
(Received via mailing list)
Louis-Philippe wrote:
> Few things to note in its favor though:
>

Versus what?

> -the redesign is highly influenced by Ruby
>

Ruby _is_ Ruby, so that's a pointless comparison.

> -it already has more than one implementations
>

So does Ruby. MRI, JRuby, IronRuby, Rubinius, Maglev...

> -one of its implementation, the Pugs, has a great deal more thoughts about
> threading than both Ruby and Python
>

How so? If the advantage is just the lack of a GIL, JRuby doesn't have a
GIL either.

> -one other implementation, Rakudo, is part of an initial push on the rosetta
> stone multi-language Parrot VM, which if it turns right could also have a
> lot of implication for Rubyists.
>

Maybe. Except that Ruby is already implemented on several VMs, so this
only really matters if a Ruby-on-Parrot port became mainstream -- and
even then, you'd probably have some people using JRuby.

> I find language war is no fun game at all,
> collaboration always wins in the end
>

I find language wars are quite fun, done well. It's a kind of
collaboration in its own right -- finding weaknesses in a given language
could be considered constructive criticism.

For instance, one of the biggest complaints about Ruby was that it's
slow. Two responses to that were YARV and Merb. And ultimately, that is
collaboration -- YARV became part of Ruby 1.9, and Merb will merge with
Rails to become Rails 3 / Merb 2.
Louis-Philippe (Guest)
on 2009-03-25 23:53
(Received via mailing list)
2009/3/25 David M. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>

> Louis-Philippe wrote:
>
>> Few things to note in its favor though:
>>
>>
>
> Versus what?
>

versus nothing, it was a gratis favor note

>
>
>  -the redesign is highly influenced by Ruby
>>
>>
>
> Ruby _is_ Ruby, so that's a pointless comparison.
>

yes, and Ruby borrowed a lot from Perl, so its good to see some of Ruby
going back to Perl


>
>  -it already has more than one implementations
>>
>>
>
> So does Ruby. MRI, JRuby, IronRuby, Rubinius, Maglev...
>

bravo!!!  I didn't meant to compare it to anything, I am only answering
the
previous post that a language needs to lives before having a logo... so
now
you know it already has 2 lives.

>
>
>  -one of its implementation, the Pugs, has a great deal more thoughts about
>> threading than both Ruby and Python
>>
>>
>
> How so? If the advantage is just the lack of a GIL, JRuby doesn't have a
> GIL either.
>

because Pugs is implemented comes from a very evolved and foreign
language,
Haskell.  Threading is an old problem, lots of solutions are already
there.
You can read the Pugs author's comment on the subject here:
http://www.perlmonks.org/?node_id=580042


> really matters if a Ruby-on-Parrot port became mainstream -- and even then,
> you'd probably have some people using JRuby.
>

I agree, and Parrot is probably not the Holy Grail...  but what if
people
made it this way?  especially considering mod_parrot, an all language
apache
module, if one day it performs great, that would mean a great
simplification
for web deployment...  its is yet to be done, but you never know what
people
a capable of when they want it.

>
you're right... but "done well" is the key in here...  gratuitious
bashing
does not show this... I'm really not saying you did that, but when you
throw
oil at the fire it is not long before the disrespectful brazier emerges.

>
> For instance, one of the biggest complaints about Ruby was that it's slow.
> Two responses to that were YARV and Merb. And ultimately, that is
> collaboration -- YARV became part of Ruby 1.9, and Merb will merge with
> Rails to become Rails 3 / Merb 2.
>

totally agree, and this feels like were finally getting somewhere :D
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