Forum: Ruby Re: Static web site generators

Announcement (2017-05-07): www.ruby-forum.com is now read-only since I unfortunately do not have the time to support and maintain the forum any more. Please see rubyonrails.org/community and ruby-lang.org/en/community for other Rails- und Ruby-related community platforms.
Peter B. (Guest)
on 2009-03-08 02:28
(Received via mailing list)
I'm a bit of an obsessive about website performance. I recently
ditched a domain registrar because the admin tools all had five to ten
second delays on each page.

Static generators can stop us having to waste chunks of our life
waiting on piss-poor dynamic web apps. Many dynamic sites really could
be static. Most dynamic sites are untuned (thus slow). What would you
think of a store that always had a ten minute checkout line? This is
really no different. If you deploy a slow website you are saying to
your users "your time isn't important to me"

So the thought of choosing a dynamic site over static seems bizarre to
me.

Peter B.
(917) 445 5663 removed_email_address@domain.invalid
Thomas S. (Guest)
on 2009-03-08 05:28
(Received via mailing list)
On Mar 7, 7:26 pm, Peter B. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>
> So the thought of choosing a dynamic site over static seems bizarre to  
> me.

I have never had a page I've created take more then a fraction of a
second to generate. I'd ditch a host that made me wait five to ten
seconds too.

T.
Tim G. (Guest)
on 2009-03-08 05:35
(Received via mailing list)
trans wrote:

>> would you think of a store that always had a ten minute checkout
> T.
Indeed, it could be the server used, host used (or how the server is
configured), the code, the connection, or anything, so while static is
going to require less processing than running code when you don't need
to, it's often about the other variables playing a role (provided the
code is efficient itself).  If the problem truly lies with the host and
their system and/or network, then we'd all agree to move on.  I've seen
a lot of people move from host to host in my time, where they hope one
host's server will run badly designed code when their last one wasn't
fast enough, only to find out it was their code or its design (though
that's certainly not always the case).  Still, I think anyone would
agree that what should or can be static, is best left static (though
sometimes tradeoffs are acceptable, so it all depends and on too many
variables to say the same from one situation to the next in any
generalized term).
This topic is locked and can not be replied to.