Forum: Ruby on Rails Advice on Mac versus PC ?

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(Guest)
on 2008-12-26 12:35
(Received via mailing list)
I am thinking of getting a new laptop. I noticed the cheapest mac was
about $1000, whereas I can get a cheap HP for about $550. The cheaper
machine is kind of appealing, but the idea of a linux type system for
a mac appeals to me however. I've always liked working on unix/linux
at various companies, but I've always owned IBM clone PC and have
never owned a mac.

 I have a HP laptop that is not quite 3 years old. I've downloaded
alot of stuff, and the machine seems to run alot slower than it used
to. It takes along time to boot, and it's gotten really bad, though I
do have AVG. I get the impression that spyware on a mac would be less
of a problem and that type of degradation might not happen as fast on
a mac or that I could more easily figure out what the heck was running
on the machine ?

 I also hear that there is less software for macs, I might like to use
winscp, a graphical SVN or such that is not to hard to install. I'm
not sure what else ofhand .. OpenOffice must work on a mac I might
guess ..

 Right now my ITunes library is on an external USB drive, I assume if
I started up ITunes on a mac it would import stuff from my IPod to
itself as this happened when I first moved my lib to an external
drive.

 I get the impression that Rails development on a mac might be
somewhat better, but I'm curious what people have to say on that ?
Matt H. (Guest)
on 2008-12-26 13:34
(Received via mailing list)
removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

>  I have a HP laptop that is not quite 3 years old. I've downloaded
> alot of stuff, and the machine seems to run alot slower than it used
> to. It takes along time to boot, and it's gotten really bad, though I
> do have AVG.

Backup, format and re-install windows. Every computer needs this now and
again. I do that to my desktop about every 3 months, keeps it running
like new, plus you'll have the experience for when a hard-disk dies.

>  I get the impression that Rails development on a mac might be
> somewhat better, but I'm curious what people have to say on that ?

A Mac runs what is probably the most popular rails IDE/editor: Textmate.

I'm not going to start editor wars again, but it really is a cracking
editor (I use it occasionally but I'm on windows 90% of the time).

It's all down to personal preference really.

HTH

Matt
Arthur Pirogovski (Guest)
on 2008-12-26 13:35
(Received via mailing list)
Using Rails on Mac is a rather good experience in my subjective opinion.
Also, there's no any problem with running some kind of linux distro on
any
modern mac laptop. Regarding most of the software there exist plenty of
ports and analogs of corresponding PC versions.
There also exist Microsoft Office for Mac and OpenOffice, NeoOffice and
iWork are pretty good alternatives. Spyware and viruses are not a
problem,
in place of them Mac OS has Software Updates which rarely may cause some
weird system crashes, so the rule No. 1 for me is to make System Update
only
after 3-4 weeks period after it was tested by other users :)

So, I think If you're experienced in *nix console programs, the switch
to
Rails dev on Mac will be a simple one while promising a better
experience.
Also you can run Win on Mac, but I'll call that a perversion :)

2008/12/26 removed_email_address@domain.invalid 
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
Frederick C. (Guest)
on 2008-12-26 13:42
(Received via mailing list)
On 26 Dec 2008, at 10:35, removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:
>
> I also hear that there is less software for macs, I might like to use
> winscp, a graphical SVN or such that is not to hard to install. I'm
> not sure what else ofhand .. OpenOffice must work on a mac I might
> guess ..
>
Well it's certainly true in some areas such a games, and specific
business areas. For rails development this isn't usually the case as
most of the tools are cross platform anyway (and often more at home on
a *nix like plaform than on windows). OpenOffice works fine for me.

Fred
Peter De Berdt (Guest)
on 2008-12-26 13:52
(Received via mailing list)
On 26 Dec 2008, at 12:33, Matt H. wrote:

>> I have a HP laptop that is not quite 3 years old. I've downloaded
>> alot of stuff, and the machine seems to run alot slower than it used
>> to. It takes along time to boot, and it's gotten really bad, though I
>> do have AVG.
>
> Backup, format and re-install windows. Every computer needs this now
> and
> again. I do that to my desktop about every 3 months, keeps it running
> like new, plus you'll have the experience for when a hard-disk dies.

You gotta be kidding. Windows users do seem to think reformatting and
reinstalling the operating system regularly is normal. Most people I
know do it every year (like spring cleaning), but every three
months... And even then, reality is most, if not all of us Mac users
don't ever reinstall their operating system, and the majority probably
doesn't even do it when there's a major system update. Same goes for
all our linux boxes btw. Not every computer needs it, simple.


Best regards

Peter De Berdt
Matt H. (Guest)
on 2008-12-26 14:04
(Received via mailing list)
Peter De Berdt wrote:
> You gotta be kidding. Windows users do seem to think reformatting and
> reinstalling the operating system regularly is normal. Most people I
> know do it every year (like spring cleaning), but every three months...
> And even then, reality is most, if not all of us Mac users don't ever
> reinstall their operating system, and the majority probably doesn't even
> do it when there's a major system update. Same goes for all our linux
> boxes btw. Not every computer needs it, simple.

I consider it normal for windows, thats it. I've got 3 linux boxes and a
solaris box sitting next to me right now. One of the linux boxes is
running dual P2-350s and has been installed for nearly 8 years.

It's just my experience that unless you really spend your life learning
windows internals, you will have to re-install, its a fact of life.
Maybe i'm just a windows dunce, but it's far easier for me to reinstall
than mess about with anything else.

I can format and re-install my windows machine with critical apps in
under 2 hours, so much easier than fiddling for days.

Matt
(Guest)
on 2008-12-26 14:07
(Received via mailing list)
if u dont worry about the additional 500 bucks, buy the mac. it's so
easy and intuitive to work on this OS - u'll love it.
try to buy an refurbished mac, you'll get some extra bucks back !
search in the apple store for refurbished products and you safe about
20% !

dont care about itunes. if u have your lib on a external drive, you
could import your music simply.
(Guest)
on 2008-12-27 06:21
(Received via mailing list)
Thanks for the advice,

 Can a mac read an external USB drive that came from a Windows XP
machine ?

 The mac sounds interesting. I like the idea of being able to pop open
a native shell to the system and do 'ps -ef' and see what is running
and be able to write a ruby script that does a fork() that works
correctly etc.
I use cygwin on windows, but it doesn't feel the same ..

 I know you can install dual windows/linux using VM-Ware or some such,
but it sounds complicated to me. I guess I don't like the idea of
reinstalling windows, but if I am going to stick with windows, I guess
I need to consider that. I'd be affraid that one of my backup CD's
would go bad or that I would screw it up somehow. I'm wondering if I
can backup windows to an external drive and reinstall it that way ?



On Dec 26, 6:14 am, "removed_email_address@domain.invalid"
Bobnation (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 07:39
(Received via mailing list)
I didn't read through everything, but why not also think of buying a
cheap laptop and then dropping a modern Linux distro on the thing? I
run Ubuntu on my Thinkpad X40 and could not be happier with it ...
well, if they had a SSD that worked with my laptop I'd be a little bit
happier.

Just a thought.

On Dec 26, 10:20 pm, "removed_email_address@domain.invalid" 
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
Conrad T. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 07:40
(Received via mailing list)
On Fri, Dec 26, 2008 at 8:20 PM, removed_email_address@domain.invalid
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid>wrote:

>
>
> Thanks for the advice,
>
>  Can a mac read an external USB drive that came from a Windows XP
> machine ?
>

Yes, it can read FAT32 formatted drives.


> I need to consider that. I'd be affraid that one of my backup CD's
> would go bad or that I would screw it up somehow. I'm wondering if I
> can backup windows to an external drive and reinstall it that way ?
>

Yes, I'm using VMWare where I have xUbuntu, FreeBSD 6.3, and FreeBSD
7.0 virtual machines (VM) to mimic our deployment servers locally.  I
simply
double-click the particular VM and it boots because there's no
installation
process.
Furthermore, you have the option to configuring the VM by downloading
and
installing additional software.

Next, if you backup your Windows to an external drive, this isn't the
same
as
reinstalling the OS because you can be potentially be restoring from
a compromised
backup (i.e. saving virus infected OS).

Lastly, I use my Macs for many types of development/work including
Rails.
 Thus,
you invest in something where you can get the most bang for your buck.
 Also, I
wouldn't make decisions to buy a system because it has more software.
This
is
not very logical as the basis for buying anything.

Good luck,

-Conrad
Mohit S. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 08:23
(Received via mailing list)
removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:
>
>  I know you can install dual windows/linux using VM-Ware or some such,
> but it sounds complicated to me. I guess I don't like the idea of
> reinstalling windows, but if I am going to stick with windows, I guess
> I need to consider that. I'd be affraid that one of my backup CD's
> would go bad or that I would screw it up somehow. I'm wondering if I
> can backup windows to an external drive and reinstall it that way ?
>
>
I think you could get something like Acronis True Image and that can do
a lot of stuff including backup your entire OS image and your data.  If
something goes off, you can probably restore the image within a couple
of hours almost back to where you left it.
http://www.techsupportalert.com/drive-imaging-reviews.htm

Cheers,
Mohit.
12/27/2008 | 2:22 PM.
(Guest)
on 2008-12-27 18:11
(Received via mailing list)
Does having VMWare as an additional layer create any inefficiencies or
problems ? I think at one time I shyed away from this idea because I
was affraid of blowing away the OS that my laptop came with.I had
brought my laptop to a linux group a few years ago and they couldn't
get linux on my laptop without blowing away the OS and seemed
reluctant to try it. At any rate, the perceived complexity of the task
made me hesitate to seriously consider it at the time.

 I also seemed to have the impression that linux distros where safer
with a desktop than a laptop and the only safe distro for laptops was
SUSE.Others may have problems with your printer, the wireless card etc

 The backup of the OS to an external drive I am not familiar with, but
I'll have to research it. If I eventually buy a new laptop, I could
possibly play around with my old laptop for experimentation purposes
perhaps. Right now I have a HP Pavillion DV1000 with about 30 gig
drive which I bought brand new in May 2006.

 The only other stuff I had heard of on Macs is that software
companies often loose money in developing for macs and seemed to
question if macs will be around for years to come. Also, mouse
functionality on macs is allegedly less convenient, maybe there is no
right click ?
Frederick C. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 18:20
(Received via mailing list)
On 27 Dec 2008, at 16:10, removed_email_address@domain.invalid wrote:

> I also seemed to have the impression that linux distros where safer
> with a desktop than a laptop and the only safe distro for laptops was
> SUSE.Others may have problems with your printer, the wireless card etc
>
Got several laptops with ubuntu in the office, no problems on that
front.
> The backup of the OS to an external drive I am not familiar with, but
> I'll have to research it. If I eventually buy a new laptop, I could
> possibly play around with my old laptop for experimentation purposes
> perhaps. Right now I have a HP Pavillion DV1000 with about 30 gig
> drive which I bought brand new in May 2006.
>
> The only other stuff I had heard of on Macs is that software
> companies often loose money in developing for macs and seemed to
> question if macs will be around for years to come.
They've been saying that for a long time and apple are still there.
Besides, not really a factor if you're writing web apps

> Also, mouse
> functionality on macs is allegedly less convenient, maybe there is no
> right click ?
>
You can right click if you want (and with the current models, even the
trackpad has an (optional) right click).
Hassan S. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 18:40
(Received via mailing list)
On Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 8:10 AM, removed_email_address@domain.invalid
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

> Does having VMWare as an additional layer create any inefficiencies or
> problems ?

No, it's just another app, but one that makes it possible to use one
system to test on all major platforms. I have a MacBook Pro running
VMs of Windows(2000, XP), Ubuntu, CentOS, OpenSolaris.

So if you /really/ need some software that's Windows-only, no prob.

And a generic three-button/scroll-wheel mouse works on it just fine,
as well.

If I were you I'd pop down to the nearest Apple store (or dealer) and
play around with a MacBook in person before you make a decision.

As far as problems installing Linux on your laptop (unsupported
peripherals, etc.) -- many distros offer bootable CD images that can
run without installation. Just download an ISO image, burn to a CD,
and try it out risk-free. Alternatively, does your BIOS support booting
from an external drive? That's another non-destructive option.

FWIW, and good luck,
--
Hassan S. ------------------------ removed_email_address@domain.invalid
(Guest)
on 2008-12-27 19:11
(Received via mailing list)
It's possible things have changed since I played around with linux,
but I have booted I think it was knoppix from my laptop CD.
It was fun to play with at the time, but I think I had to configure or
mount things every time I booted.
Right now my laptop CD drive is no longer working and I have been
using an external CD drive through USB.

 I had also played with installing vector linux, DSL linux, and
knoppix on some older junk PC's that people gave me and which only had
10 gig drives or something. I had tried booting Ubuntu once on my
mothers newer desktop, but I don't think it had enough memory.

 At any rate, the unsolved question fro me is if I would want to go
the route of linux on an IBM PC laptop or consider getting a Mac
laptop. The first option would involve me researching what I would
need to do or learn in order to install linux myself, which distro I
should select, which laptop I would need etc,






On Dec 27, 11:40 am, "Hassan S." <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
Hassan S. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 19:27
(Received via mailing list)
On Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 9:10 AM, removed_email_address@domain.invalid
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

>  At any rate, the unsolved question fro me is if I would want to go
> the route of linux on an IBM PC laptop or consider getting a Mac
> laptop. The first option would involve me researching what I would
> need to do or learn in order to install linux myself, which distro I
> should select, which laptop I would need etc,

Or just buy one -- I believe both Lenovo and Dell sell systems with
Linux installed; if not, you can probably find someone local selling
pre-configured systems.

But as I said, try the Mac and see what you think. There are things
I dislike about mine, but overall I think it's the best solution for a
mobile Web developer. YMMV!

--
Hassan S. ------------------------ removed_email_address@domain.invalid
(Guest)
on 2008-12-27 20:04
(Received via mailing list)
Hey, that's really interesting. I found dell laptops with ubuntu
starting at $500.
http://www.dell.com/content/topics/segtopic.aspx/l...

 I assume that they could read from my external drive as well ? Can
ITunes run on ubuntu ? Is installation of software involve more steps
and complexity on ubuntu ?

 anyway, that's a good price, what advantages do you think a mac has ?
I know it was mentioned textmate IDE for rails ...



On Dec 27, 12:26 pm, "Hassan S." <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
Hassan S. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 20:58
(Received via mailing list)
On Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 10:04 AM, removed_email_address@domain.invalid
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>
> Hey, that's really interesting. I found dell laptops with ubuntu
> starting at $500. 
http://www.dell.com/content/topics/segtopic.aspx/l...
>
>  I assume that they could read from my external drive as well ?

Presumably :-)

> Can ITunes run on ubuntu ?

No, though you could run it on Windows under VMWare (or Parallels)

> Is installation of software involve more steps
> and complexity on ubuntu ?

Sorry, too vague a question to reasonably answer, IMO.

>  anyway, that's a good price, what advantages do you think a mac has ?

As I said -- on a Mac, you can do browser testing (or desktop software
testing, for that matter) of the three major platforms: Mac/Win/*nix.

On a Windows or *nix machine, you only get two of those three.

I like OmniGraffle for IA work (flow charts, etc.). And there's consumer
stuff that's available for Mac and Win* that isn't available for *nix,
but
you just have to decide how important that is to you.

My primary dev system for a long time was a SuSE desktop machine
so I was used to the minimal-consumer-toys issue. Though I had to
use it for a week recently when my MBP logic board died and mostly
I missed Twitterific  :-)

Anyway, HTH!
--
Hassan S. ------------------------ removed_email_address@domain.invalid
(Guest)
on 2008-12-27 21:52
(Received via mailing list)
I'm not as serious a web developer as some, and at the moment I have
a job doing back end Ruby stuff mostly, but I have to keep an eye to
the future just in case. I come from a back end programming
background, and have tried to get into front end a bit, though I seem
to prefer back end work and do better with that.  That had something
to do with why my last stint with web development ended which was my
first job doing web stuff, though it was PHP and the management got
sick of me trying to push Rails ..

 I saw there are some u-tube videos on dual booting with vmware, I'll
have to check them out when I am someplace with a higher speed
internet. From a quick look at some web sites, it seems like at least
a slightly complicated thing to figure out ..

 If I got a mac, I could possibly set up my older HP laptop to run
Ubuntu, it has 500 meg of ram .. I thought I saw ubuntu can run in 380
meg of ram, but I'm not sure if 500 is ideal or not. Assuming it was,
that way I'd have ITunes on the mac and could still play with a
serious linux distro and put my old laptop to good use as it is
getting bogged down with XP it seems as time goes on ..







On Dec 27, 1:57 pm, "Hassan S." <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
Conrad T. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 21:56
(Received via mailing list)
Sent from my iPhone

On Dec 27, 2008, at 10:04 AM, "removed_email_address@domain.invalid"
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

>
> Hey, that's really interesting. I found dell laptops with ubuntu
> starting at $500. 
http://www.dell.com/content/topics/segtopic.aspx/l...
>
> I assume that they could read from my external drive as well ? Can
> ITunes run on ubuntu ? Is installation of software involve more steps
> and complexity on ubuntu ?
>

You should be able to if it is properly configured.  iTunes is only
available for Mac and Windows.  Lastly, it really depends on the
package management system you're using.  In general, it's fairly easy
to perform software installs.

> anyway, that's a good price, what advantages do you think a mac has ?

Again, this really depends on your personal preference.  Also, please
feel free to visit your local Apple Store and test drive the Mac OS
X.  It's like buying a car where you try before you buy.

>
> I know it was mentioned textmate IDE for rails ...

I wish that you don't purchase a Mac to only use Textmate.  You should
have bigger goals for investing in a Mac or at least using it more
than to run Textmate.  In short, you should evaluate your goals as
well as your budget constraints in making your purchasing decision.

Good luck,

-Conrad
(Guest)
on 2008-12-27 22:24
(Received via mailing list)
>
> > I know it was mentioned textmate IDE for rails ...
>
> I wish that you don't purchase a Mac to only use Textmate.  You should
> have bigger goals for investing in a Mac or at least using it more
> than to run Textmate.  In short, you should evaluate your goals as
> well as your budget constraints in making your purchasing decision.
>

 I do have a general favorable impression of mac, and that's just one
aspect of it. I have been sort of obsessed with Ruby and Rails.  I
also wonder if having some familiarity with mac software might help my
IT resume in general ..
Hassan S. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 22:44
(Received via mailing list)
On Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 11:51 AM, removed_email_address@domain.invalid
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

>  I saw there are some u-tube videos on dual booting with vmware,

? I'm not sure what you mean: VMWare just runs as an application
under MacOS. You install other operating systems under it. So, for
instance, I'm using all my Mac apps plus I have a window open with
an OpenSolaris desktop and apps, or Ubuntu, or Windows.

Perhaps you're thinking of Boot Camp, which is a dual-boot setup.

>  If I got a mac, I could possibly set up my older HP laptop to run
> Ubuntu, it has 500 meg of ram .. I

If I had a 3-year-old laptop with only 500m memory and a bad CD
drive, I'd call it a doorstop and dump it.

> that way I'd have ITunes on the mac and could still play with a
> serious linux distro

Get the Mac and VMWare and you can play with as many distros as
you have disk space for, while you're listening to your music  :-)

--
Hassan S. ------------------------ removed_email_address@domain.invalid
Matt H. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 22:49
(Received via mailing list)
Hassan S. wrote:
> If I had a 3-year-old laptop with only 500m memory and a bad CD
> drive, I'd call it a doorstop and dump it.

Whereas if I had one, I'd do something useful with it :P

My router/firewall is a dual P2-350 with 400mb ram and it's been working
fine with gentoo on it for years and years. It never overheats, it's
almost silent and I almost never have to touch it :)
(Guest)
on 2008-12-27 23:08
(Received via mailing list)
> ? I'm not sure what you mean: VMWare just runs as an application
> under MacOS. You install other operating systems under it. So, for
> instance, I'm using all my Mac apps plus I have a window open with
> an OpenSolaris desktop and apps, or Ubuntu, or Windows.
>

 I guess people also use VMWare on IBM PC's to dual boot linux and
windows ..

Is the VMWare you use free ?
Hassan S. (Guest)
on 2008-12-27 23:52
(Received via mailing list)
On Sat, Dec 27, 2008 at 1:07 PM, removed_email_address@domain.invalid
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

>  I guess people also use VMWare on IBM PC's to dual boot linux and
> windows ..

1) it's *not* "dual boot" -- dual boot means you're choosing which OS
     to run, and only one at at time; VMWare lets you run multiple guest
     OSs simultaneously along with your "host" OS.

2) VMWare has desktop versions for Win/Linux/MacOS. I run VMWare
     on my SuSE desktop to host Windows and other distros for testing.

> Is the VMWare you use free ?

Nope, but at US$60 extremely reasonably priced for what it does, IMO.

--
Hassan S. ------------------------ removed_email_address@domain.invalid
MarcRic (Guest)
on 2008-12-28 13:36
(Received via mailing list)
Hi,

I have a few arguments (some philosophical, some practical),  for you
to THIMK about.

1- I'm a Windows user. Why?
phy - I think I'm just in the middle: not so open like Linux (which
pretend to run and work with everywhere), and not so closed as OS/X
which is TOTALLY platform dependent.
pra - I'm an AMD fan regular user (they are cheaper), a Mac costs
twice here then everywhere else, thanks to government taxes.

2 - I'm a happy windows user for years, with a few tries on Linux, but
always back to Windows.
phy - Laziness
pra - Things simply don't work on Linux out of the box: once I need to
buy 3 web cams, to get one working (Ubuntu), and I couldn't use it on
the "Messenger like" Linux software. Another one: where in the hell
things you download and install goes? I need to download the stuff i
choose again and again (OK it is laziness)... Look, I'm using Windows
XP SP 3, installed for more then a year and man believe me I' download
a LOT. My Win-AMD station still working fine. Most of the time the
problem is on the software around and people blame Windows ! Firefox 3
is driving me crazy for instance. I think I will be back to 2, or give
Opera a try.

3 - About iTunes, well... Sorry for you.
phy - there is a Zillion of open stuff to do the same (OK may not so
cute).
pra - iAnything costs a LOT.

4 - Better developing on Mac then Windows ? Well, it is like the old
question: Which is the best text processor? which leads to the ancient
answer: It is the one that bast feet you!
phy - I don't buy it
pra - If you are an IDE guy? Use Netbeans. If you are a Command line +
editor guy use Console + Komodo edit, and be happy

The only draw back on Rails World with Windows is that most of the
time, Rails developers (which unfortunately most of the time are Mac
users) tend to ignore 90% of the market (don't ask me why), so, there
are somethings that you will need to wait a few months to get working
good on Windows (recent experiences: Merb, which was not Rails but now
it is and they fixed that before the "merge"; and CouchDB, which I'm
still waiting a decent Windows version which I don't need to do by
myself from sources, to give it a try).

Good look with your decision !

All the best.
Peter De Berdt (Guest)
on 2008-12-28 15:35
(Received via mailing list)
> My Win-AMD station still working fine. Most of the time the
> problem is on the software around and people blame Windows ! Firefox 3
> is driving me crazy for instance. I think I will be back to 2, or give
> Opera a try.

I have Firefox 3 running perfectly on every operating system. Must be
the software again right?

> 3 - About iTunes, well... Sorry for you.
> phy - there is a Zillion of open stuff to do the same (OK may not so
> cute).
> pra - iAnything costs a LOT.

iTunes is free. iLife is free with every consumer Mac. iWork is $79
for a complete office suite that works very well. How much is
Microsoft Office?

> 4 - Better developing on Mac then Windows ? Well, it is like the old
> question: Which is the best text processor? which leads to the ancient
> answer: It is the one that bast feet you!
> phy - I don't buy it
> pra - If you are an IDE guy? Use Netbeans. If you are a Command line +
> editor guy use Console + Komodo edit, and be happy

IDEs are a personal preference, true. Most Rails developers seem to
like something that's slim, fast and reliable. Netbeans for me is
bloated, extremely slow and crashes more than a drunk driving a car
(at least it still does on Windows for me, but that must be the
software again).

Best regards

Peter De Berdt
John I. (Guest)
on 2008-12-28 18:40
(Received via mailing list)
Don't forget there's an XML file in your iTunes library (probably in
the "my music" folder) that has your playlists and such. You'd have to
move that tp the mac or what ever you get. And if you plug in the USB
drive into a mac the "drive" letters might be different. Find/
replace?
HTH

John.
Randy K. (Guest)
on 2008-12-29 16:05
(Received via mailing list)
On Friday 26 December 2008 06:52 am, Peter De Berdt wrote:
>
> On 26 Dec 2008, at 12:33, Matt H. wrote:
>
> >> I have a HP laptop that is not quite 3 years old. I've downloaded
> >> alot of stuff, and the machine seems to run alot slower than it
used
> >> to. It takes along time to boot, and it's gotten really bad, though
I
> >> do have AVG.
> >
> > Backup, format and re-install windows. Every computer needs this now
> > and
> > again. I do that to my desktop about every 3 months, keeps it
running
> > like new, plus you'll have the experience for when a hard-disk dies.
>
> You gotta be kidding.

I did it about every 6 months on my regularly used (Windows)
computers--this was back in the day when I used Windows 95 and 98.  It
definitely was required for Windows and/or the mix of applications I
used.

To the OP: I think you know that PCs today can run Linux (just has to be
installed unless you find a pre-installed version), and then, with
Linux installed, I wouldn't expect a Mac with Linux to be any better
than a PC with Linux (with the possible exception of some different
applications available).

Randy K.
--
I didn't have time to write a short letter, so I created a video
instead.--with apologies to Cicero, et.al.
(Guest)
on 2009-01-01 00:41
(Received via mailing list)
Here's some other thoughts I had on macs after looking at this page
and browsing around some sections on the bottom:
http://developer.apple.com/macosx/architecture/index.html

 I think it might be cool sometime to maybe do some programming with
ITunes if I could think of some cool projects. I never download all of
my podcasts automatically, but sometimes I might be interested in
knowing which of my favorite podcasts have updated as I am more
interested in some than others and looking at each one individually is
time consuming, maybe there's some other things I might think of at
some point.

 I like the idea that MAC OS probably comes with a linux C++ compiler
and maybe I could write some ruby gems in C++.

 If the MAC has some decent free API's for audio, video, or other
peripherals, I might want to play around with stuff of that sort.

All that kind of stuff could potentially help me build my resume up a
bit and be interesting ..

I looked at the MAC laptop that has 2 gig of memory for a round $1300
that looked interesting ..
(Guest)
on 2009-01-01 01:12
(Received via mailing list)
One other thing that I am curious about is if I could put together
text to speech utilities on a Mac using free stuff or what's already
there ? I bought the book 'practical ruby projects' and from some
stuff in there I did a simple utility that just runs from a dos shell.
Anytime you highlight text and copy it into the past buffer it reads
the text using some text to speech .dll ..  so I can have it read
email, stuff on the web, whatever ..

 I'd also be curious about free speech to text stuff on a MAC ? I
never got that far on windows, though I played around with some stuff,
it was a bit more complicated ...
Frederick C. (Guest)
on 2009-01-01 10:56
(Received via mailing list)
On 31 Dec 2008, at 23:12, "removed_email_address@domain.invalid" 
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
wrote:

>
> One other thing that I am curious about is if I could put together
> text to speech utilities on a Mac using free stuff or what's already
> there ?

There is a text to speech api that is part of os x

Fred
Peter De Berdt (Guest)
on 2009-01-01 14:40
(Received via mailing list)
Oh the memories, a small history lesson, this is something from a year
before Windows was introduced:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0FtgZNOD44#t
=3m6s

Things have considerably improved over the years, but back then it was
groundbreaking.

On 01 Jan 2009, at 09:55, Frederick C. wrote:

> There is a text to speech api that is part of os x
>
>> I'd also be curious about free speech to text stuff on a MAC ? I
>> never got that far on windows, though I played around with some
>> stuff,
>> it was a bit more complicated ...

Best regards

Peter De Berdt
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