Forum: Ruby Enhanced Ruby editor

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Charged P. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 18:46
(Received via mailing list)
All,

I know this subject has been mention a few time recently but I'll ask
again and hopefully I'll be specific enough that its new.

I've been using SCITE as my main code editor.  I'm not a developer
just a sysadmin so for the scripts that I use VBscript and Ruby it
fills my need and then some.

My needs listed below for the curious and to keep the alternate editor
suggestions to a minimum
* Lightweight (smaller is better)
* Cross platform (I use linux at home)
* Free
* Multiple tabs for many open files
* Handles a fair number of language for syntax highlighting
* Customizable (color schemes and added shortcuts for svn use)

Recently I was working with someone on some VBscript and I noticed a
feature that I had forgotten existed in VBscript editors.  That
feature was a drop down box to switch between various functions.  I
know that VBscript is different from Ruby but I was wondering if there
are any Ruby editors that have something similar to traverse class
definitions or blocks or any of the other Ruby structures.

I imagine that a person might be able to customize SCITE to add a
feature like this but aside from not knowing LUA I'm also a relative
coding and Ruby novice.  So I'm asking the group if anyone has seen or
knows of something similar?

C.Particle
anansi (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 18:55
(Received via mailing list)
CParticle wrote:
> That feature was a drop down box to switch between various functions.
>

I know this feature from borland's delphi IDE, I think you mean that if
you type behind an object a dot like: "object." You get a drop down box
with every possible method for this object. I also couldn't find
anything which works similar for ruby.

At the moment I'm just using gedit with ruby syntax-highlighting which
works fine.

I heard eclipse should be nice for ruby but in mine eyes eclipse is
slow, ugly and overloaded so at least I don't wanna use it. Maybe you
wanna risk some testing with it.



--
greets

                            (
                            )
                         (
                  /\  .-"""-.  /\
                 //\\/  ,,,  \//\\
                 |/\| ,;;;;;, |/\|
                 //\\\;-"""-;///\\
                //  \/   .   \/  \\
               (| ,-_| \ | / |_-, |)
                 //`__\.-.-./__`\\
                // /.-(() ())-.\ \\
               (\ |)   '---'   (| /)
                ` (|           |) `
          jgs     \)           (/


one must still have chaos in oneself to be able to give birth to a
dancing star
M. Edward (Ed) Borasky (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 19:00
(Received via mailing list)
CParticle wrote:
> suggestions to a minimum
> * Lightweight (smaller is better)
> * Cross platform (I use linux at home)
> * Free
> * Multiple tabs for many open files
> * Handles a fair number of language for syntax highlighting
> * Customizable (color schemes and added shortcuts for svn use)
>
Almost Komodo editor -- free as in price but not as in speech,
Linux/Windows for sure, and I think MacOS and Solaris, lots of tabs and
language lexical highlighting and fairly customizable. The SVN (and CVS)
interfaces require the paid version, Komodo, which also includes the
other IDE goodies like debuggers.
Gregory S. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 19:32
(Received via mailing list)
On Thu, May 03, 2007 at 11:45:05PM +0900, CParticle wrote:
[...]
> My needs listed below for the curious and to keep the alternate editor
> suggestions to a minimum
> * Lightweight (smaller is better)
> * Cross platform (I use linux at home)
> * Free
> * Multiple tabs for many open files
> * Handles a fair number of language for syntax highlighting
> * Customizable (color schemes and added shortcuts for svn use)

Vim fulfills all of the requirements you've listed, and it's been my
editor
of choice (counting vi before vim existed) for more than a decade and a
half.

> knows of something similar?
AFAIK, Vim does not currently have a facility to do that.

> C.Particle
--Greg
Mike M. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 19:33
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/3/07, M. Edward (Ed) Borasky <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> >
> Linux/Windows for sure, and I think MacOS and Solaris, lots of tabs and
> language lexical highlighting and fairly customizable. The SVN (and CVS)
> interfaces require the paid version, Komodo, which also includes the
> other IDE goodies like debuggers.


You may also want to look at jEdit:
http://jedit.org/
Charged P. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 19:45
(Received via mailing list)
On May 3, 10:54 am, anansi <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>
> I heard eclipse should be nice for ruby but in mine eyes eclipse is
> slow, ugly and overloaded so at least I don't wanna use it. Maybe you
> wanna risk some testing with it.

When I'm referring to a drop down I'm talking about a tool bar drop
down.  I'm not speaking about the context sensitive drop down that
suggest all possible choices while you are typing code.  What I'm
talking about is a feature that simple let you go to a particular
already written block of code.  So if you have written multiple
functions in a long script it lets you select any one of those and
jump right to it instead of having to go searching through the code to
find that particular section.

CParticle
Gregory S. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 20:01
(Received via mailing list)
On Fri, May 04, 2007 at 12:45:07AM +0900, CParticle wrote:
> > works fine.
> functions in a long script it lets you select any one of those and
> jump right to it instead of having to go searching through the code to
> find that particular section.

Ah, this is supported by ctags. It sounds like the kind of extension
someone would have written already for Vim. Do some searching at
http://www.vim.org/search.php to see if what you are looking for is
already
out there.

> CParticle
--Greg
Charged P. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 20:06
(Received via mailing list)
On May 3, 11:00 am, "M. Edward (Ed) Borasky" 
<removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> > My needs listed below for the curious and to keep the alternate editor
> language lexical highlighting and fairly customizable. The SVN (and CVS)
> interfaces require the paid version, Komodo, which also includes the
> other IDE goodies like debuggers.

Ed,
Your right this does sound very much like Komodo at least from what I
see on their site.  I'll have to make some time to try it out. You are
correct in saying that it exist for MacOS(both Intel and PowerPC) I
don't see a Solaris version though. One of the big drawbacks I see
though is that the editor by itself is a 27mb download while Scite is
under 1mb not that, that should be a real issue with todays download
speeds and drive sizes but something to consider. Like I said I will
have to look more closely at it as it does look very complete.

Thanks
C.Particle
Charged P. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 20:11
(Received via mailing list)
On May 3, 11:32 am, Gregory S. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
wrote:
> > * Handles a fair number of language for syntax highlighting
> > are any Ruby editors that have something similar to traverse class
>
> --Greg

Greg,

Thanks for you comment about VIM I have used it and currently have it
configured to do Ruby Syntax highlighting.  I don't use often as I'm
mostly working from the GUI not in a shell but I do like it and the
way does some things.  I do know that GVIM exists to but I've never
really been attracted to it as a GUI.

The feature I was asking about was what I was really interested in.
I'm happy with SCITE but I'm always looking at new software and I was
interested in seeing a Ruby version of that VBscript feature.

Again Thanks

CParticle
ChrisH (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 20:16
(Received via mailing list)
On May 3, 11:43 am, CParticle <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:

> When I'm referring to a drop down I'm talking about a tool bar drop
> down.  I'm not speaking about the context sensitive drop down that
> suggest all possible choices while you are typing code.  What I'm
> talking about is a feature that simple let you go to a particular
> already written block of code.  So if you have written multiple
> functions in a long script it lets you select any one of those and
> jump right to it instead of having to go searching through the code to
> find that particular section.
>
> CParticle

Its not a drop-down list, but its close 9^)

The free Komodo editor has a 'Find all Functions' feature under the
Code menu.
This will list all the methods and you can jump to a particular method
by simply double-clicking it in the results

You could do something similar in SciTe if you right a little script
(Ruby of course) to scan a given file for all methods and return a
list with the line number and add that to the Tool menu for Ruby
files.  Maybe someone has done this?

Cheers
Chris
Charged P. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 20:27
(Received via mailing list)
On May 3, 12:01 pm, Gregory S. <removed_email_address@domain.invalid>
wrote:
> > > At the moment I'm just using gedit with ruby syntax-highlighting which
> > already written block of code.  So if you have written multiple
> --Greg
Greg,

Wow ctags seems to be it for SCITE.  I did a quick search on ctags for
SCITE and there are all sorts of things out there on how to set it
up.  I'll have to look into how to get that to work.  Its probably not
as pretty as editor integrated feature I was looking at but it seems
to be the right functionality.  Thanks again.

C.Particle
Charged P. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 20:31
(Received via mailing list)
On May 3, 12:10 pm, ChrisH <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>
> (Ruby of course) to scan a given file for all methods and return a
> list with the line number and add that to the Tool menu for Ruby
> files.  Maybe someone has done this?
>
> Cheers
> Chris

I think this is similar to ctags in SciTe that Greg's post led me to.
Here is a link to a wiki about it.
http://lua-users.org/wiki/SciteTags
C.Particle
anansi (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 20:36
(Received via mailing list)
If you just meant this ctag feature ,also gedit has a plugin for that:
http://www.stambouliote.de/tarballs/gedit_classbro...

but I really miss this feature to have quick every method and property
of an object in front of my eyes. anyone knows any editor for ruby which
supports that?

--
greets

                            (
                            )
                         (
                  /\  .-"""-.  /\
                 //\\/  ,,,  \//\\
                 |/\| ,;;;;;, |/\|
                 //\\\;-"""-;///\\
                //  \/   .   \/  \\
               (| ,-_| \ | / |_-, |)
                 //`__\.-.-./__`\\
                // /.-(() ())-.\ \\
               (\ |)   '---'   (| /)
                ` (|           |) `
          jgs     \)           (/


one must still have chaos in oneself to be able to give birth to a
dancing star
Suraj K. (Guest)
on 2007-05-03 22:04
Gregory S. wrote:
> On Thu, May 03, 2007 at 11:45:05PM +0900, CParticle wrote:
> [...]
>> My needs listed below for the curious and to keep the alternate editor
>> suggestions to a minimum
>> * Lightweight (smaller is better)
>> * Cross platform (I use linux at home)
>> * Free
>> * Multiple tabs for many open files
>> * Handles a fair number of language for syntax highlighting
>> * Customizable (color schemes and added shortcuts for svn use)
>
> Vim fulfills all of the requirements you've listed, and it's been my
> editor of choice (counting vi before vim existed) for more than a decade
> and a half.

If you like Vim, have a look at VimMate:  http://vimmate.rubyforge.org/

It has a project file browser with SVN integration, tabs for open files,
an attached/embedded terminal, and more.  Just see the screenshots and
video.
Lloyd L. (Guest)
on 2007-05-04 18:20
anansi wrote:
> I know this feature from borland's delphi IDE, I think you mean that if
> you type behind an object a dot like: "object." You get a drop down box
> with every possible method for this object. I also couldn't find
> anything which works similar for ruby.

As I understand it, Code Gear (who owns Delphi now) found some ambitious
lads that were working on making a Delphi like interface for Ruby.
Those lads now are working for Code Gear to make Delphi for Ruby.  I
have not seen any screenshots of that but I have played with Delphi for
PhP and that has the features that you reference and all the standard
gizmos that made Delphi so wonderful to use.

In short, hang on as such a thing is incoming.  Just thinking about
Delphi for Ruby gives me a happy!

-Lloyd

There are 10 kinds of people in the world:  those that understand binary
and those that do not.
Logan C. (Guest)
on 2007-05-04 18:29
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/3/07, CParticle <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
> > > * Cross platform (I use linux at home)
> > > Recently I was working with someone on some VBscript and I noticed a
> >
> mostly working from the GUI not in a shell but I do like it and the
>
>
> fwiw,

1. run ctags
2. start vim
3. ESC :tag <TAB>. Repeatedly hitting tab will cycle thru the list
Huw C. (Guest)
on 2007-05-04 19:50
(Received via mailing list)
"Lloyd L." <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote in message
news:removed_email_address@domain.invalid...
> anansi wrote:
>> I know this feature from borland's delphi IDE, I think you mean that if
>> you type behind an object a dot like: "object."

Do you mean syntax-senstive IntelliSense/code completion. We have that
in
Ruby In Steel Developer. It's fully analytical IntelliSense which means
that
our code completion interprets your code as it is entered to work out
the
types of each variable and which code completion is appropriate taking
into
account scope, class hierarchy, singleton methods, mixins etc.

You might want to watch some screencasts to verify that this is the kind
of
thing you are after:
http://www.sapphiresteel.com/Ruby-In-Steel-Movies

best wishes
Huw C.

http://www.sapphiresteel.com
Ruby P.ming In Visual Studio 2005
Eric P. (Guest)
on 2007-05-04 23:05
(Received via mailing list)
Komodo Edit is free (as in beer), and ships on Win, OS X, and Linux
(sorry, the Solaris version was discontinued recently).

Komodo features several ways of switching to an arbitrary function:

1. Use the code browser, expand a class or module to show its members,
and double-click on one

2. Hit the Goto-definition command when the cursor is over a method

3. Find in Files... to search for strings or patterns in a subtree

4. Write a ctags-aware macro or extension

On #4, Komodo is implemented mostly in XUL+JavaScript+CSS+Python, and
we
ship all that source.  The extension mechanism is the same as
Firefox's, and
you can write macros in either JavaScript or Python.  There is an
active extension
forum at http://support.activestate.com/

Thanks,
Eric
Chris C. (Guest)
on 2007-05-05 18:19
(Received via mailing list)
On 5/3/07, anansi <removed_email_address@domain.invalid> wrote:
>                                         (
>                                  (\ |)   '---'   (| /)
>                                   ` (|           |) `
>                             jgs     \)           (/
>
>
> one must still have chaos in oneself to be able to give birth to a
> dancing star
>
>

The latest NetBeans milestones supports that.
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